For the First Time in 40 Years, Rome's Colosseum Will Open Its Top Floor to the Public

iStock
iStock

The Colosseum’s nosebleed seats likely didn’t provide plebeians with great views of gladiatorial contests and other garish spectacles. But starting in November, they’ll give modern-day tourists a bird's-eye look at one of the world’s most famous ancient wonders, according to The Telegraph.

The tiered amphitheater’s fifth and final level will be opened up to visitors for the first time in several decades, following a multi-year effort to clean, strengthen, and restore the crumbling attraction. Tour guides will lead groups of up to 25 people to the stadium’s far-flung reaches, and through a connecting corridor that’s never been opened to the public. (It contains the vestiges of six Roman toilets, according to The Local.) At the summit, which hovers around 130 feet above the gladiator pit below, tourists will get a rare glimpse at the stadium’s sloping galleries, and of the nearby Forum and Palatine Hill.

In ancient Rome, the Colosseum’s best seats were marble benches that lined the amphitheater’s bottom level. These were reserved for senators, emperors, and other important parties. Imperial functionaries occupied the second level, followed by middle-class spectators, who sat behind them. Traders, merchants, and shopkeepers enjoyed the show from the fourth row, and the very top reaches were left to commoners, who had to clamber over steep stairs and through dark tunnels to reach their sky-high perches.

Beginning November 1, 2017, visitors will be able to book guided trips to the Colosseum’s top levels. Reservations are required, and the tour will cost around $11, on top of the normal $14 admission cost. (Gladiator fights, thankfully, are not included.)

[h/t The Telegraph]

Turn Your Couch or Bed Into an Office With This Comfortable Lap Desk

LapGear
LapGear

If you're not working in an office right now, you'll understand the freedom of taking a Zoom meeting from your back porch, jotting down notes from your bed, and filling out spreadsheets from your sofa. But working from home isn't always as comfortable as everyone thinks it is, especially if you're trying to get through the day while balancing a notebook, computer, and stationery on your lap. To give you the space you need while maintaining your well-earned place on the couch, LapGear has the perfect solution to your problems with their lap desk, which you can find on Amazon for $35.

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With more than 6000 reviews and a 4.8-star rating on Amazon, the lap desk can fit laptops and tablets up to 15.6 inches across and includes an integrated 5-inch-by-9-inch mouse pad and cell phone slot for better organization. There's even a ledge built into the desk to help keep your device from sliding when you're at an angle.

For some added comfort, the bottom of the desk is designed with dual-bolster cushions, so you'll never have to feel a hot laptop on your thighs again. The top surface is available in various colors like white marble ($30), silver carbon ($35), and oak woodgrain ($35) to work with your design aesthetic.

Find out more about LapGear’s lap desk here on Amazon.

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Lindt Opened the World’s Largest Chocolate Museum in Switzerland, Complete With a 30-Foot-Tall Chocolate Fountain

There aren’t any 10-foot strawberries to dip in it, unfortunately.
There aren’t any 10-foot strawberries to dip in it, unfortunately.
Lindt & Sprüngli

Earlier this month, Lindt unveiled its sparkling new chocolate museum—which happens to be the largest chocolate museum in the world—near Zurich, Switzerland. The Lindt Home of Chocolate doesn’t have a Willy Wonka-esque chocolate river, but its nearly 30-foot-tall chocolate fountain is almost as enchanting.

According to Time Out, about 1500 liters of cocoa soup cascade from the golden whisk down to the massive LINDOR truffle and back again. Although you’re only allowed to enjoy it from a distance, you’ll get a chance to sample some of Lindt’s mouth-watering products in the tasting room at the end of the tour. But before that, you’ll find out how the magic happens: There’s a state-of-the-art research plant on the premises, with a production line in full view of visitors.

All LINDOR truffles should be this size.Lindt & Sprüngli

There’s also an exhibition that tracks chocolate through history, revealing how the Swiss became chocolate trailblazers and showing cocoa’s path from plantations in Ghana to factories in Switzerland. Along the way, you might find out a trade secret or two from one of the world’s best chocolate makers.

“The Lindt Home of Chocolate is the home of the renowned Master Chocolatiers, who are now opening their doors and inviting guests to immerse themselves into the fantastical world of chocolate,” the company said in a press release.

All this learning will help you work up an appetite.Lindt & Sprüngli

The project was funded by the Lindt Chocolate Competence Foundation, which seeks to further Switzerland’s confectionery legacy on a global scale.

“The Lindt Home of Chocolate will play an important role in safeguarding Switzerland’s position as a chocolate country in the long-term, as well as contribute to the transfer of knowledge across the entire industry,” Ernst Tanner, president of the Lindt Chocolate Competence Foundation, said in a press release.

The museum will also play an important role in satisfying the sweet tooth of every chocolate lover who waltzes through the doors, as the accompanying Lindt Chocolate Shop is the largest one on Earth.

[h/t Time Out]