These Connected Graves in the Netherlands Prove Love Conquers All

Frank Janssen, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
Frank Janssen, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Established in 1785, Het Oude Kerkhof in Roermond, the Netherlands, is one of the oldest municipal cemeteries in the country—and it's home to a pair of graves that use a crafty design to prove love can conquer anything.

As author Loren Rhoads explains in her new book 199 Cemeteries to See Before You Die, in 1842 a 22-year-old Catholic noblewoman named J.C.P.H. van Aefferden fell in love with a 33-year-old commoner named J.W.C. van Gorkhum, a colonel in the Dutch cavalry who happened to be Protestant. Their marriage was a local scandal, but the pair stayed together for 40 years. Their union only ended with van Gorkhum's death in 1880, and even then, van Aefferden made sure they wouldn't be totally separated.

At the time, plots in Het Oude Kerkhof ("The Old Cemetery" in Dutch) were strictly divided into Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish sections, with borders maintained by thick hedges or brick walls. As a Protestant, van Gorkhum couldn't be buried in the van Aefferden family plot in the Catholic section, where she was supposed to spend eternity.

Door Janssenfrank Wikimedia // CC BY-SA 3.0

The devoted wife got around the predicament by ordering a unique pair of grave markers—two tall white monuments that stretch above the brick wall separating the Catholic and Protestant sections. From each monument, a white hand (one masculine, the other feminine) reaches out to grasp the other, their fingers locked for eternity.

Colonel van Gorkhum was buried beneath the grave with the masculine hand, at the edge of the Protestant section, and when his wife died eight years later, she was laid to rest beneath the grave with the feminine hand, at the edge of the Catholic section.

Henk Kosters, Flickr // CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Nearly 130 years later, tourists flock to the graves, which are known locally as Het graf met de handjes, or “Grave with the little hands.” It's a beautiful reminder that when there's a will, love tends to find a way.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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Jeff Koons's Puppy Sculpture, at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Is Donning a Face Mask

Puppy by artist Jeff Koons is now sporting a face mask.
Puppy by artist Jeff Koons is now sporting a face mask.
Erika Ede/Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Artist Jeff Koons’s Puppy sculpture located at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Bilbao, Spain, has always been dynamic. The 40-foot-tall depiction of a West Highland Terrier is made of flower mantles that change with the seasons. From begonias and petunias in spring and summer to pansies in winter, it’s never exactly the same thing twice.

Now Koons is offering another variation on Puppy—a face mask made from flowers.

The addition was made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that’s radically altered life for citizens worldwide and serves as a reminder that public health policy could save lives.

“What an honor it is to be able to have Puppy communicate the importance of wearing a mask during this time of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Koons said in a press release. “A Bilbao resident sent me a letter asking if Puppy could wear a mask, which I thought was wonderful idea. I was thrilled that the Museum agreed as now Puppy, adorned with a mask made of white and blue flowers, can communicate the importance of wearing a mask to protect against the spread of COVID-19.

"One of the most important acts that we can make to each other during this pandemic is to share information on how we can protect each other. I can imagine that the Puppy has appreciated all of the love shown toward it and is so happy to communicate safety and well-being to the citizens of Bilbao and the world.”

Puppy has been in residence since the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao opened in 1997. Koons has made a career of outsized sculptures. His Balloon Dog sold for $58.4 million in 2013.