Cockatoos Destroy Australia's Broadband Network

iStock
iStock

Slow or fickle internet is the headache felt around the world. But Australians have a particularly bad case of broadband blues, thanks in part to its wild birds. As Reuters reports, cockatoos—a type of parrot with a distinctive feather crest—are chewing up power and fiber cables, and causing tens of thousands of dollars' worth of damage.

Australia’s internet is notoriously slow. (It's currently ranked 50th in the world by speed, according to a recent report.) This prompted officials to launch a $36 to $38 billion broadband network plan, which will quite literally bring the nation up to speed. It’s slated for completion in 2021, but construction delays and budget overspills will likely prolong the process, according to Bloomberg.

The project has received plenty of public criticism due to its cost and sluggish download speeds, among other issues. Now, officials (and engineers) face yet another obstacle: cockatoos. Native to Australia, the birds typically dine on fruit, nuts, wood, and bark. But they’ve taken to chowing down on cables, which are strung from nearly 2000 fixed wireless towers around Australia.

“Cockatoos have developed their penchant for cables to maintain their hard, sharp beaks that incessantly grow and must be constantly worn down to remain in top working condition,” explained Australia’s National Broadband Network (NBN) in a recent blog post. (The NBN is the body responsible for improving the country's broadband infrastructure.)

Meanwhile, Gisela Kaplan, a professor in animal behavior at the University of New England, told Reuters that the color or position of the cables might have enticed the birds. Typically, she says, they prefer pecking at wood or bark.

So far, cables on eight towers in Australia have been destroyed, with as many as 200 cables suffering damages. (Many of these towers are located in southeast Australia, where grain is grown.) These cables are spares, which are strung for future capacity needs. Unlike the active cables, they aren’t protected by plastic casing, which makes them vulnerable to bird nibbles. Technicians also can't tell if they’re damaged until they arrive on site for maintenance or upgrades.

The birds’ insatiable chewing habits have led to costly repair bills. Replacements for frayed power and fiber cables cost up to $7650 U.S. each—and so far, the cockatoos have rendered around $61,500 worth of equipment useless according to the NBN.

“You wouldn’t think it was possible, but these birds are unstoppable when in a swarm,” said project manager Chedryian Bresland, according to NBN. “I guess that’s Australia for you; if the spiders and snakes don’t get you, the cockies will.”

To prevent future damages, NBN officials plan to install inexpensive protective casing on cable ends. Hopefully, the birds won’t find them as delicious as steel-braid wires.

[h/t Reuters]

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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The 10 Best Shark Movies of All Time, According to Rotten Tomatoes

MCA/Universal Home Video
MCA/Universal Home Video

If the ongoing popularity of shark films has taught us anything, it’s that we simply can’t spend enough screen time with these predators, who can famously ruin a beach day with one swift gnash of their teeth. And even if shark attacks are far less common than Hollywood would have us believe, it’s still entertaining to watch a great white stalk an unsuspecting fictional swimmer—or, in the case of 2013’s Sharknado, whirl through the air in a terrifying cyclone.

To celebrate Shark Week this week, Rotten Tomatoes has compiled a list of the best shark movies of all time, ranked by aggregated critics' score. Unsurprisingly topping the list is Steven Spielberg’s 1975 classic Jaws, which quite possibly ignited our societal fixation on great white sharks. The second-place finisher was 2012’s Kon-Tiki, based on the true story of Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl’s harrowing voyage across the Pacific Ocean on a wooden raft in 1947.

If you did happen to write off Sharknado as too kitschy to be worth the watch, you might want to reconsider—it ranks sixth on the list, with a score of 78 percent, and its 2014 sequel sits in ninth place, with 61 percent. The list doesn’t only comprise dramatized shark attacks. In seventh place is Jean-Michel Cousteau’s 2005 documentary Sharks 3D, a fascinating foray into the real world of great whites, hammerheads, and more.

But for every critically acclaimed shark flick, there’s another that flopped spectacularly. After you’ve perused the highest-rated shark films below, check out the worst ones on Rotten Tomatoes’ full list here.

  1. Jaws (1975) // 98 percent
  1. Kon-Tiki (2012) // 81 percent
  1. The Reef (2010) // 80 percent
  1. Sharkwater (2007) // 79 percent
  1. The Shallows (2016) // 78 percent
  1. Sharknado (2013) // 78 percent
  1. Sharks 3D (2004) // 75 percent
  1. Open Water (2004) // 71 percent
  1. Sharknado 2: The Second One (2014) // 61 percent
  1. Jaws 2 (1978) // 60 percent

[h/t Rotten Tomatoes]