How Your Job Can Predict Whether Or Not You’ll Get Divorced

iStock
iStock

These days, divorce is actually on the wane—2016 marked a nearly 40-year low in U.S. divorces—but whether or not you and your beloved spouse eventually part ways isn’t entirely up to fate. While individual relationships are all unique, statistically, there are demographic and other factors that influence whether or not a couple will divorce, from no-brainers like whether or not you’re willing to share chores equitably to more subtle factors like whether one partner smokes.

Your job matters too, as statistician Nathan Yau found in his analysis of 2015 data from the Census Bureau’s 5-year American Community Survey. As Business Insider and Entrepreneur report, the data shows that there can be vastly different divorce statistics when you’re talking about the marriages of bartenders and those of physical therapists, for instance.

Nathan Yau // Flowing Data

That doesn’t mean that going to work in a physical therapy office somehow better equips you for marriage than tending bar. Higher incomes and education levels, both intimately tied to your job, are also correlated with lower divorce rates. Sure, maybe the fact that flight attendants have to be away from their families for their job plays into their high divorce rates, but perhaps the type of person who wants to be a flight attendant might also be less inclined to settle down compared to people who dream of being an actuary.

Where does your job fall? Here are 10 fields with the lowest divorce rates surveyed:

1. Actuaries: 17 percent
2. Physical scientists: 18.9 percent
3. Medical and life scientists: 19.6 percent
4. Clergy: 19.8 percent
5. Software developers, applications and systems software: 20.3 percent
6. Physical therapists: 20.7 percent
7. Optometrists: 20.8 percent
8. Chemical engineers: 21.1 percent
9. Directors of religious activities and education: 21.3 percent
10. Physicians and surgeons: 21.8 percent

And here are the 10 highest-divorcing industries:

1. Gaming managers: 52.9 percent
2. Bartenders: 52.7 percent
3. Flight attendants: 50.5 percent
4. Gaming services workers: 50.3 percent
5. Rolling machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic: 50.1 percent
6. Switchboard operators: 49.7 percent
7. Extruding and drawing machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic: 49.6 percent
8. Telemarketers: 49.2 percent
9. Textile knitting and weaving machine operators: 48.9 percent
10. Extruding, forming, pressing, and compacting machine setters, operators, and tenders: 48.8 percent

Explore the data further on Flowing Data.

[h/t Business Insider]

8 of Amazon's Bestselling Home Office Desks

JOISCOPE/Amazon
JOISCOPE/Amazon

If you've been working from home for the past six months (or longer), you're overdue for a high-quality office desk. And not just any old one, but a desk designed specifically for comfort and purpose, so you can organize everything you need for your 9-to-5 without having to worry about losing track of that important folder or planner.

The problem, though, is that there are so many options out there to choose from. That’s why we've stepped in to make the process a bit easier for you by compiling a list of the bestselling home office desks from Amazon. Check them out below.

1. Furinno Simplistic A-Frame Computer Desk; $237

Furinno/Amazon

This Furinno A-Frame desk is Amazon’s top home office desk at the moment. Though it may seem simple, sometimes that's all you need to make your space more efficient. The small desk hutch on top creates little cubbies for you to store papers, notebooks, or tools you may need throughout the day. There's even a bench on the bottom for you to put your feet up during the last few hours of the workday.

Buy it: Amazon

2. CubiCubi 40-inch Home Office Table; $95

CubiCubi/Amazon

For those looking for a sleek, modern desk that doesn't skimp on function, go for the CubiCubi. The metal frame, combined with the black wood surface, gives this table a sturdy, reliable feel. There's also a built-in side pocket to store all your papers out of eyesight but within arm’s reach. And according to the company, the whole thing should only take 10 minutes to assemble.

Buy it: Amazon

3. Coleshome 31-inch Computer Desk; $84

Coleshome/Amazon

This 31-inch desk from Coleshome is the perfect option for a small home office. Complete with adjustable leg pads for added stability, this desk can fit in any nook and is designed with simplicity in mind.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Mr. Ironstone Black L-Shaped Desk; $130

Mr. IRONSTONE/Amazon

This unique L-shaped desk is perfect for anyone looking to fit their workstation into the corner of a room. Measuring at 50.8 inches on both sides, you’ll get the most out of your surface by adding multiple monitors, a printer, and books all around.

Buy it: Amazon

5. Furinno Efficient Home Desk with Side Shelves; $53

Furinno/Amazon

If you want to make your office feel more like a study, then you’ll need somewhere to store all your tomes. This Furinno desk can help you make space to work and house all your favorite books nearby to grab whenever you need them. The multilevel shelves help make this desk feel more modern, while also creating plenty of storage space.

Buy it: Amazon

6. JOISCOPE 40-inch Computer Desk; $110

JOISCOPE/Amazon

This desk comes packed with plenty of storage space for your things while also providing a large, sleek worktop for you to spread out all day long. The oak finish on top also adds a bit of sophistication to your workday, even if you spend your lunch break perusing the latest cat memes.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Seville Classics Ergonomic Mobile Desk Cart; $44

Seville/Amazon

Standing desks have become more popular in recent years as people look for more ways to improve their posture and overall health. The Seville Ergonomic Mobile Desk can help you achieve your physical goals while assisting you with your work. The desk's height can be adjusted from 20.5 inches to 33 inches, and it has four swivel wheels, two of which lock in case you want to stay in one spot.

Buy it: Amazon

8. ComHoma Black Writing Computer Desk Office Folding Table; $100

ComHoma/Amazon

For a modern design, there's the ComHoma writing desk. The sleek metal bars on the sides and back of the desk add style, not clutter, and the 39-inch tabletop will give you ample space to work on whatever projects come your way.

Buy it: Amazon

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

How Coronavirus and 31 Other Infectious Diseases and Viruses Got Their Names

Rotavirus—from the Latin rota, for "wheel"—is named for the wheel-like appearance of its particles.
Rotavirus—from the Latin rota, for "wheel"—is named for the wheel-like appearance of its particles.
Dr_Microbe/iStock via Getty Images

As you may already know, the corona in coronavirus has no relation to a certain refreshing beer often served with a slice of lime. Corōna means “crown” in Latin—and Spanish and Italian, too—and virologists chose it in 1968 to describe the group of viruses characterized by crown-like spikes that protrude from their surfaces.

So how do other viruses and diseases get their names? Based on the infographic below, created by Adam Aleksic for his website, The Etymology Nerd, there isn’t just one way. Some, like the coronavirus, are named for how they look under a microscope. The rota in rotavirus, for example, which means “wheel” in Latin, reflects the virus’s wheel-like appearance when viewed beneath an electron microscope.

Others are named after the locations where they were discovered or studied. In 1947, scientists named a newly identified mosquito-borne virus after Uganda’s Zika Forest. In 1977, Yale researchers investigating a string of pediatric arthritis cases in the town of Lyme, Connecticut, started referring to the illness as “Lyme arthritis.” Later, the name was modified to “Lyme disease” when scientists realized patients were exhibiting other symptoms, too.

Still others are characterized by the symptoms they cause. People with tetanus—from the Greek tetanos, for “tension”—usually experience muscle stiffness, and the skin of yellow fever sufferers often takes on a yellow tint due to jaundice.

Find out the origins of malaria, measles, and more below. And follow The Etymology Nerd on Instagram for more fascinating etymological explanations.

Unsurprisingly, there's a lot of Latin in this infographic.The Etymology Nerd