Wreck of Australian World War I Submarine Found After 103 Years

Australian Government, Copyright Commonwealth of Australia
Australian Government, Copyright Commonwealth of Australia

During World War I, the Royal Australian Navy’s first submarine, AE1, was assigned to capture Germany's Pacific colonies. While the mission was a success, it turned tragic when AE1 and its crew disappeared—without a distress call—off the coast of Papua New Guinea on September 14, 1914. Now, following decades of mystery and multiple searches, AE1’s wreckage has finally been found, the Associated Press reports.

Furgro Equator, a Dutch survey vessel, located AE1 in mid-December as part of a search expedition funded partly by the Australian government. Submerged at nearly 1000 feet off the coast of Papua New Guinea's Duke of York Islands, the submarine is being treated as the grave site of its 35 crew members from Australia, England, and New Zealand.

Wreckage of Australian World War I naval submarine HMAS AE-1
Australian Government, © Commonwealth of Australia

According to a government press release, officials held a small memorial service for the deceased and are trying to contact their descendants. The Australian government will work together with the Papua New Guinean government to preserve the vessel’s wreckage and commemorate the tragedy.

As the first Allied submarine lost during World War I and the first ever lost by the Royal Australian Navy, AE1 holds a unique place in maritime history. It vanished just a day after the surrender of German New Guinea, but investigators ruled out enemy combat as an explanation for its disappearance; the only German ship nearby was a small survey boat.

Wreckage of Australian World War I naval submarine HMAS AE-1
Australian Government, © Commonwealth of Australia

Wreckage of Australian World War I naval submarine HMAS AE-1
Australian Government, © Commonwealth of Australia

Experts still don’t know what caused the vessel to sink. But because searchers at the time of its disappearance never found an oil slick, debris field, or bodies, experts assumed that the sub had struck a reef and sunk while remaining intact. While this theory hasn't been verified, the wreckage should provide more clues.

[h/t Associated Press]

The ChopBox Smart Cutting Board Has a Food Scale, Timer, and Knife Sharper Built Right Into It

ChopBox
ChopBox

When it comes to furnishing your kitchen with all of the appliances necessary to cook night in and night out, you’ll probably find yourself running out of counter space in a hurry. The ChopBox, which is available on Indiegogo and dubs itself “The World’s First Smart Cutting Board,” looks to fix that by cramming a bunch of kitchen necessities right into one cutting board.

In addition to giving you a knife-resistant bamboo surface to slice and dice on, the ChopBox features a built-in digital scale that weighs up to 6.6 pounds of food, a nine-hour kitchen timer, and two knife sharpeners. It also sports a groove on its surface to catch any liquid runoff that may be produced by the food and has a second pull-out cutting board that doubles as a serving tray.

There’s a 254nm UVC light featured on the board, which the company says “is guaranteed to kill 99.99% of germs and bacteria" after a minute of exposure. If you’re more of a traditionalist when it comes to cleanliness, the ChopBox is completely waterproof (but not dishwasher-safe) so you can wash and scrub to your heart’s content without worry. 

According to the company, a single one-hour charge will give you 30 days of battery life, and can be recharged through a Micro USB port.

The ChopBox reached its $10,000 crowdfunding goal just 10 minutes after launching its campaign, but you can still contribute at different tiers. Once it’s officially released, the ChopBox will retail for $200, but you can get one for $100 if you pledge now. You can purchase the ChopBox on Indiegogo here.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

Explore Two of Pompeii’s Excavated Homes in This Virtual Tour

A photo of the Pompeii ruins from November 2019.
A photo of the Pompeii ruins from November 2019.
Ivan Romano/Getty Images

It’s been nearly 2000 years since the eruption of Mount Vesuvius decimated Pompeii in 79 C.E., and archaeologists are still uncovering secrets about life in the ancient Roman city. As Smithsonian reports, they’ve recently excavated two homes in Regio V, a 54-acre area just north of the Pompeii Archaeological Park—and you can see the findings for yourself in a virtual tour published by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities.

The 7.5-minute video comprises drone footage of the houses and surrounding ruins, along with commentary by park director Massimo Osanna that explains what exactly you’re looking at and what types of people once lived there. Osanna’s commentary is in Italian, but you can read the English translation here.

The homes, both modest private residences that probably housed middle-class families, border the Vicolo dei Balconi, or “Alley of the Balconies.” The first is fittingly named “House With the Garden” because excavators discovered that one of its larger rooms was, in fact, a garden. Excavators pinpointed the outlines of flowerbeds and even made casts of plant roots, which paleobotanists will use to try to identify what grew there. In addition to the garden and vibrant paintings that feature classic ancient deities like Venus, Adonis, and Hercules, “House With the Garden” also preserved the remains of its occupants: 11 victims, mostly women and children, who likely took shelter within the home while the men searched for a means of escape.

Across the street is “House of Orion,” named for two mosaics that depict the story of Orion, a huntsman in Greek mythology whom the gods transformed into the constellation that bears his name today.

“The owner of the house must have been greatly attracted to this myth, considering it features in two different rooms in which two different scenes of the myth are depicted,” Osanna says. “It is a small house which has proved to be an extraordinary treasure chest of art."

To see what Pompeian houses would’ve looked like before Mount Vesuvius had its fiery fit, check out this 3D reconstruction.

[h/t Smithsonian]