Gustav Klimt at 100: Painter. Photographer. Dress Maker.

Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images
Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images

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The famously erotic, semi-psychedelic, sometimes gold-leafed paintings of bohemian artist Gustav Klimt once scandalized Austrian society. Today, of course, they’ve become museum-shop staples and dorm-room must-haves. The Austrian painter, who died 100 years ago, was known for his sensual portraits of women wearing shimmering, swirling dresses, but less so for the creative—and possibly romantic—partnership that brought the dresses to life.

MORE THAN COLLABORATORS?

 Gustav Klimt and Emilie Floege in a dress with floral pattern in the garden of the Oleander villa in Kammer at the Attersee lake.
Imagno/Getty Images

The dresses now so closely associated with Klimt's work were a collaboration with Emilie Louise Flöge, a Vienna native Klimt met when she was just 18. Until Klimt's death in 1918, Emilie remained a close companion and perhaps a lover, and was a groundbreaking fashion designer with a radical streak in her own right. (Pictured: Emilie and Klimt in 1910.)

THE SISTERS FLÖGE

Emilie, Helene und Pauline Floege sitting in a rowboat with Gustav Klimt.
Imagno/Getty Images

Klimt met Emilie after his brother married her sister—and then promptly died. Klimt was left to care for the widow, which allowed him to spend plenty of time with the family Flöge and young Emilie. (Pictured: The three Flöge sisters, with Emilie at the far left, and Klimt in a rowboat in 1910.)

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Emilie Louise Floege (Floge) by Gustav Klimt
Leemage/Corbis, Getty Images

Emilie began her climb in the fashion world by working as a seamstress at her sister’s dressmaking school in Vienna. In 1899, the sisters won a dressmaking competition and went on to design a dress for a widely attended exhibition. (Pictured: Emilie, as painted by Klimt in 1902.)

DESIGNING WOMAN

Emilie Floege wearing a dress
Imagno/Getty Images

Emilie, presumably in a dress of her own design, in about 1910.

UP THE FASHION LADDER

Emilie Floege In A Reform Dress Designed By Eduard Josef Wimmer-Wisgrill.
ÖNB/Imagno/Getty Images

Emilie quickly established herself as a savvy businesswoman, opening Flöge Sisters, a haute couture fashion salon in Vienna. She traveled to Paris and London, studying the work of designers like Coco Chanel and Christian Dior, among others.

WORKING TOGETHER

Hope, II by Gustav Klimt
VCG Wilson, Corbis, Getty Images

Many of the dresses that appear in Klimt's most celebrated works were created in concert with Emilie: He designed the patterns, she the fabric and cuts.

KLIMT BEHIND THE CAMERA

Emilie Floege In A Reform Dress.
Imagno/Getty Images

Klimt took many photographs of these collaborations. Emilie's designs were influenced by the early Feminist movement: They were flowing, comfortable clothes for women (no corsets!) that hung loosely from the shoulders. In this picture by Klimt from 1906, Emilie wears a dress she designed.

CLASSIC IMAGES

Emilie Floege in a reform dress.
Imagno/Getty Images

Even with referrals from Klimt, who was at this point painting portraits of Vienna's high-society women, sales of Emilie's revolutionary fashions were not brisk. Here, Emilie as photographed by Klimt in 1906 or 1907.

SKY-HIGH SALES

Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II
Imagno/Getty Images

Klimt was quite successful, but no one could have predicted how sought-after his works would eventually become. "Adele Bloch-Bauer II," pictured above and one of Klimt's most famous paintings, was a portrait of the wife of a wealthy Klimt patron. The Nazis snatched it from the family home during WWII but in 2006, the work was purchased at auction for nearly $88 million. The buyer? Oprah Winfrey, who eventually sold it for a reported $150 million.

For more Klimt photos, visit FOTO.

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The Rise of David Bowie Is a Photographic Deep Dive Into the Musician's Ziggy Stardust Days

This new book examines Bowie's life on and off stage.
This new book examines Bowie's life on and off stage.
TASCHEN

David Bowie will always be remembered as more than a singer. The larger-than-life performer was also an artist, an actor, and even launched his own short-lived internet service provider in the late '90s. But, arguably, his most memorable period was during the early '70s, when he burst onto the scene as the garishly costumed Ziggy Stardust, cementing his place in history as a performer who defied just about every norm imaginable. Now you can get an intimate look at this pivotal moment in his career with the new book from TASCHEN, The Rise of David Bowie ($40).

A new book about David Bowie
Mick Rock spent a year as Bowie's photographer and videographer.
TASCHEN

The images found in this 300-page book are by Mick Rock, a photographer known as "the man who shot the seventies." His career took off alongside Bowie's, and between 1972 and 1973, Rock was the musician's go-to photographer and videographer. Inside the book, you’ll find photographs of Bowie both on stage and behind the scenes, giving fans an up-close look at the transformative performer's life on the road as he honed his daring new persona for the Ziggy Stardust world tour.

Rock compiled the photos back in 2015, after he received the late singer’s blessing to do so. Currently, the book is available for pre-order and it’s set to ship by the end of March if you order from TASCHEN. For those heading to Amazon to pre-order, books will ship around April 21.

Did you know Bowie was an avid reader who often finished a book a day? While you wait for your copy to arrive, check out the performer's 100 favorite books, which include titles like Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary and The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

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Rare, Early Portraits of Jim Morrison and The Doors Are Headed to Auction

Jim Morrison of The Doors photographed in 1968.
Jim Morrison of The Doors photographed in 1968.
Michael Montfort, Swann Auction Galleries

The Doors left a bluesy mark on rock ’n’ roll music that lasted long after the tragic death of frontman Jim Morrison at age 27. But because the band only existed for about six years—in a pre-smartphone era, no less—there isn’t a ton of behind-the-scenes content to tell the story of Morrison’s bright, albeit brief, career.

Come February 25, nine rare photos of Morrison from The Doors’ first European tour in 1968 will end up in the hands of one fortunate fan. Swann Auction Galleries is selling them as part of their “Classic and Contemporary Photographs” auction, which also includes portraits of early Hollywood stars like Joan Crawford, John Barrymore, and Veronica Lake.

The black and white photographs of Morrison were taken by German-born photojournalist Michael Montfort when the band performed in Frankfurt, Germany that September, and they manage to capture the strangely hazy, somewhat intense nature of the legendary lead singer. In one, Morrison looks right into the camera while leaning against a church pulpit; in another, he lies on the stage clutching the microphone with his back turned to the audience; in yet another, a sweat-drenched Morrison holds a leather jacket in one hand and makes a peace sign with the other.

jim morrison of the doors lying onstage
The Doors' Jim Morrison takes a break onstage during a Frankfurt concert in September 1968.
Michael Montfort, Swann Auction Galleries

The Doors played early hits like “Light My Fire” and “Break on Through (To the Other Side)” to raucous, devoted crowds across Europe, but the tour wasn’t without its calamities, due largely to Morrison’s substance abuse. After leaving Frankfurt, the band stopped to perform a show in Amsterdam, where a drug-addled Morrison collapsed on stage during Jefferson Airplane’s opening set. He was immediately taken to a hospital, and keyboard player Ray Manzarek stepped in as lead singer that night. Morrison finished the tour, but his drug addiction would continue to plague him until he died of a (suspected) overdose in Paris in 1971.

jim morrison the doors backstage photo
A messy-haired Morrison flashes a peace sign in 1968.
Michael Montfort, Swann Auction Galleries

The collection of nine photos is expected to fetch between $1500 and $2500, and you can place a bid here.

[h/t Swann Auction Galleries]

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