Museum Finds 2500-Year-Old Mummy in a Sarcophagus Marked 'Empty'

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iStock

Nearly 160 years ago, the Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney acquired the sarcophagus of the Egyptian priestess Mer-Neith-it-es. But it wasn't until last year that researchers realized her remains came with it.

The Independent reports that one of the university's early founders, Sir Charles Nicholson, purchased the casket for the museum's fledging Egyptian collection around 1860. Hieroglyphs marking the outside of the sarcophagus indicated that it belonged to Mer-Neith-it-es, a high priestess who served in the temple of the lion-headed goddess Sekhmet around 600 BCE. But the mummy itself was apparently missing: A 1948 handbook listed the coffin as 'empty' and the museum database reported it containing only "mixed debris."

Researchers didn't question its status until June of last year, when they came upon a surprising discovery after opening the sarcophagus for the first time since it arrived at the museum. Inside they found human bones that had avoided detection for more than a century and a half.

The 2500-year-old mummy, which is likely that of Mer-Neith-it-es, isn't fully intact. Tomb raiders got to the coffin before the museum did, leaving behind the fragmented remains of only 10 percent of her body, along with some bandages and more than 7000 beads from a funeral shawl.

Despite its rough appearance, the mummy could provide researchers with invaluable insights into Egyptian life in 600 BCE, the last era when ancient Egypt was ruled by native Egyptians. Further analysis of her bones may reveal details surrounding the priestess's health, eating habits, and any diseases she had while she was alive.

[h/t Independent]

Thursday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Guitar Kits, Memory-Foam Pillows, and Smartwatches

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Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 3. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

Archaeologists Discover the Jousting Yard Where Henry VIII Had His Historic Accident

National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Henry VIII may have never earned his reputation as an ill-mannered tyrant if it weren't for injuries he sustained at age 44. Now, as Live Science reports, archaeologists have uncovered the infamous jousting yard where that history-changing accident took place.

Prior to the beheading of Anne Boleyn—his second of six wives—King Henry VIII was regarded as a kind, gregarious leader by those who knew him. The point where descriptions of him changed their tone coincided with a fall he took on January 24, 1536.

While jousting at Greenwich Palace, Henry was tossed from his armored horse and further injured when his steed fell on top of him. The incident caused him to lose consciousness for two hours and nearly cost him his life.

Though it was never diagnosed, some experts believe Henry VIII sustained a brain injury that day that altered his personality. From that point on, he was characterized as irritable and cruel. He was in constant pain from migraines and an ulcerated leg, which could also explain the mood shift. The (sometimes violent) dissolution of most of his marriages occurred post-accident.

Ruins of the jousting yard, or tiltyard, where that fateful incident took place are located 5.5 feet beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, the former site of Greenwich Palace. After falling into disrepair, the palace was demolished by Charles II, and the exact location of the tiltyard was forgotten. A team of archaeologists led by Simon Withers of the University of Greenwich used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to locate the remnants buried beneath the ground earlier this year.

The giveaways were the footprints of two octagonal towers. The archaeologists say these were likely the foundations of the bleacher-like viewing stands where spectators watched jousting matches. That would place the historic tiltyard about 330 feet east of where it was originally thought to be situated.

The radar scans provided a peek at what lies beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, but to learn more, the archaeologists will need to get their hands dirty. Their next step will be digging up the site to get a better look at the ruins.

[h/t Live Science]