The Greatest Fears Americans Have About Traveling, Mapped

Plenty of people get nervous before taking a big trip, but not everyone fears the same thing. A new map based on data gathered by the home security company Your Local Security suggests that different regions have different fears about travel.

The company surveyed 25 travel experts and used Google Trends and the keyword research tool keyword.io to figure out what people get most anxious about. Surprisingly, only three states said “flying,” and they all share borders—Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming.

Some, like Nevadans, feared the very likely headache of flight delays, while others feared common annoyances like packing and a lack of Wi-Fi and cell phone service. Massachusetts residents worry about lost luggage, Alaskans are anxious about making it through customs, and Hawaiians, perhaps understandably given their location, are not happy about their likely jet lag. Oregonians and Missourians may take more road trips than cross-country or international vacations, because they were more worried about traffic accidents than planes. Some people fear language barriers the most—perhaps they should take a crack at DuoLingo? And in Texas, their biggest fear was getting homesick.

However, none of these fears should prevent you from jetsetting. After all, if you believe foreign travel warnings, America is full of crime, road rage, and unhelpful taxi drivers. Oh, and terrible plumbing. Meanwhile, many Americans find U.S. shower heads to be just fine, and don’t worry too much about their taxi driver’s directional sense—proving that sometimes, our fears about travel can be a bit overblown.

Every State’s Favorite Place to Spend Spring Break, Mapped

DisobeyArt, iStock via Getty Images
DisobeyArt, iStock via Getty Images

Spring break falls in March 2020 in many parts of the U.S., and if you still don't know where to go this year, check out the popular travel plans of people in your home state for some inspiration.

This map Travelocity put together using its own customer data shows the most disproportionately popular spring break destinations for residents of all 50 states and Washington, D.C. It should come as no surprise that Florida cities dominate the map. Orlando was the top springtime vacation spot of 10 states, including Texas, Georgia, and Massachusetts. Miami, Tampa, and Pensacola also appear on the list.

But not everyone craves warm weather this time of year. As college students flood their state, Florida natives flee north to Chicago. And some states farther north prefer vacation spots that are decidedly not tropical. In Idaho, spring-breakers are heading to Seattle, and in West Virginia, they're booking trips to Buffalo—neither of which are cities that come to mind when you think of margaritas and bikinis. You can find the preferences of your home state in the map below.

Map of top spring break destinations.
Travelocity

Spring break may seem like a modern phenomenon, but people have been using the arrival of the season as an excuse for debauchery since ancient Roman times. You can read more about the history of spring break here.

Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant


Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas.


And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work.


You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

This article originally ran in 2015.

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