The Most Popular '90s Sitcom in Each State

Do you have the same taste in TV as the majority of the people in your state? The folks over at satellite provider USDish.com put together a map of the most popular '90s sitcom in each of the 50 states.

The company's data is from Google search interest from 2004 to the present, capturing the tail end of the run of some of these shows and the beginning of an era of fans constantly watching reruns on TV. It's no surprise that the universally popular Friends dominates the map, with 13 states claiming it as their most-watched show. It is not, however, New York's most-watched show: fellow New York City-set series Seinfeld has that honor. Out of the Friends contingent, six are states in the Midwest: perhaps these viewers are dreaming of leaving cornfields behind and moving to The City That Never Sleeps.

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air came in second as the favorite of four states (Maryland, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina) plus Washington, D.C. Weirdly, Pennsylvania isn't in this group: Pennsylvanians' fave program is Step by Step. It's also the only state to choose Step by Step. Guess they really love family in PA!

There are a few other instances in which a show is claimed by the state in which it's set: Washington loves Seattle-centric Frasier; Ohio roots for the Cleveland-set Drew Carey Show; and Wisconsin can't stop watching That '70s Show, which is set in fictional Point Place, Wisconsin.

Utah supports 3rd Rock from the Sun, which makes sense given that the state is a hotbed for UFO sightings. What about California, home of Hollywood and the beautiful people in the film and TV biz? Well, those beautiful people like to watch yellow cartoon people. That's right, The Simpsons is Cali's most-loved show.

See the map below and visit USDish.com for an in-depth look at the data.

Every State’s Favorite Place to Spend Spring Break, Mapped

DisobeyArt, iStock via Getty Images
DisobeyArt, iStock via Getty Images

Spring break falls in March 2020 in many parts of the U.S., and if you still don't know where to go this year, check out the popular travel plans of people in your home state for some inspiration.

This map Travelocity put together using its own customer data shows the most disproportionately popular spring break destinations for residents of all 50 states and Washington, D.C. It should come as no surprise that Florida cities dominate the map. Orlando was the top springtime vacation spot of 10 states, including Texas, Georgia, and Massachusetts. Miami, Tampa, and Pensacola also appear on the list.

But not everyone craves warm weather this time of year. As college students flood their state, Florida natives flee north to Chicago. And some states farther north prefer vacation spots that are decidedly not tropical. In Idaho, spring-breakers are heading to Seattle, and in West Virginia, they're booking trips to Buffalo—neither of which are cities that come to mind when you think of margaritas and bikinis. You can find the preferences of your home state in the map below.

Map of top spring break destinations.
Travelocity

Spring break may seem like a modern phenomenon, but people have been using the arrival of the season as an excuse for debauchery since ancient Roman times. You can read more about the history of spring break here.

Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant


Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas.


And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work.


You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

This article originally ran in 2015.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER