Brush Away Your Sniffles With New Allergy-Fighting Toothpaste

iStock
iStock

For people with severe allergies, relief can cost a lot of time. Doctors can administer allergy shots, but you need them regularly, as often as multiple times a week. If you don’t complete the proper regimen, which can last for years, the treatment won’t be effective. Popular Science reports that there’s a new method for administering long-term allergy medicine that could prove a whole lot more convenient for patients, and it doesn’t involve any needles. It’s toothpaste.

Allerdent is a specially formulated toothpaste that can be customized to treat particular allergies. Typical allergy shots contain very small amounts of the allergen you’re trying to desensitize your body to—much like a vaccine contains the microbe of the disease it’s designed to inoculate you against. With Allerdent, instead of putting that allergen extract in a shot, the doctor mixes it into a toothpaste base. Patients can take that toothpaste home and use it daily, rather than coming in for a weekly allergy shot.

It’s not the first mouth-based allergy medicine. There are also under-the-tongue allergy drops that are widely used in Europe, but they can irritate the stomach and throat if you accidentally swallow them. But since the mucus membrane of the mouth has a high immune response (to protect against all the weird stuff you put in your mouth every day), it’s a great place to administer allergy medicine. Allergy toothpaste similarly allows you to put the medicine where it’s most effective, but it doesn't involve holding a squirt of oil in your mouth, and it doesn't have any gastrointestinal side effects.

The toothpaste comes with a pre-measured pump so that you get exactly the amount of medicine you need (no need to eyeball what the size of a pea is) and it can remain effective with up to 10 allergen extracts, so you could treat multiple allergies at one time. It could be especially effective to treat kids, since they're more likely to have trouble with shots or under-the-tongue drops. And, because it's something you can do at home, patients are more likely to stick to the regimen.

Allerdent isn’t easy to obtain at the moment. Your doctor has to order it, and because the FDA hasn’t approved allergen extracts in toothpaste (they’re only approved in shot form), your insurance company might not pay for it. As research into Allerdent and other oral allergy medicines progresses, though, the product might become easier to access.

[h/t Popular Science]

Crocs Is Donating More Than 100,000 Pairs of Shoes to Healthcare Workers

Sturdy, comfortable Crocs are a favorite among healthcare professionals.
Sturdy, comfortable Crocs are a favorite among healthcare professionals.
David Silverman/Getty Images

Crocs have long been a favorite among healthcare workers who spend hours on their feet each day—and now, they can get a pair for free.

This week, the company announced that it will give away more than 100,000 pairs of shoes to medical professionals fighting the new coronavirus in the U.S. ClickOrlando reports that workers can submit their requests for Crocs Classic Clogs or Crocs at Work via an online form on the Crocs website, which will open each weekday at 12 p.m. EST and continue accepting orders until it fulfills its daily allotment.

According to a press release, that allotment is a whopping 10,000 pairs of shoes per day. The as-yet-unspecified end date for the program—called “A Free Pair for Healthcare”—depends on inventory levels and the number of requests the company receives. In addition to shipping shoes to individuals, Crocs is also planning to donate up to 100,000 more pairs directly to healthcare organizations. So far, they’ll send shoes to the Dayton Area Hospital Association in Ohio, St. Anthony North Health Campus in Denver, Colorado, the Atlantic Health System in New Jersey, and more.

“These workers have our deepest respect, and we are humbled to be able to answer their call and provide whatever we can to help during this unprecedented time,” Crocs president and CEO Andrew Rees said in the release. “Share the word to all those in healthcare and please be mindful to allow those who need these most to place their requests. This is the least we can do for those working incredibly hard to defeat this virus.”

Healthcare professionals can request their free Crocs here.

[h/t ClickOrlando]

On This Day in 1953, Jonas Salk Announced His Polio Vaccine

Getty Images
Getty Images

On March 26, 1953, Dr. Jonas Salk went on CBS radio to announce his vaccine for poliomyelitis. He had worked for three years to develop the polio vaccine, attacking a disease that killed 3000 Americans in 1952 alone, along with 58,000 newly reported cases. Polio was a scourge, and had been infecting humans around the world for millennia. Salk's vaccine was the first practical way to fight it, and it worked—polio was officially eliminated in the U.S. in 1979.

Salk's method was to kill various strains of the polio virus, then inject them into a patient. The patient's own immune system would then develop antibodies to the dead virus, preventing future infection by live viruses. Salk's first test subjects were patients who had already had polio ... and then himself and his family. His research was funded by grants, which prompted him to give away the vaccine after it was fully tested.

Clinical trials of Salk's vaccine began in 1954. By 1955 the trials proved it was both safe and effective, and mass vaccinations of American schoolchildren followed. The result was an immediate reduction in new cases. Salk became a celebrity because his vaccine saved so many lives so quickly.

Salk's vaccine required a shot. In 1962, Dr. Albert Sabin unveiled an oral vaccine using attenuated (weakened but not killed) polio virus. Sabin's vaccine was hard to test in America in the late 1950s, because so many people had been inoculated using the Salk vaccine. (Sabin did much of his testing in the Soviet Union.) Oral polio vaccine, whether with attenuated or dead virus, is still the preferred method of vaccination today. Polio isn't entirely eradicated around the world, though we're very close.

Here's a vintage newsreel from the mid 1950s telling the story:

For more information on Dr. Jonas Salk and his work, click here.

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