15 Weird Things Celebrities Have Autographed

Getty Images
Getty Images

We’ve all seen videos of rock stars signing women’s breasts, even their butts. There are even super fans who have celebrity autographs tattooed on their skin. In fact, signing body parts isn’t even that weird these days. Here are a few of the strangest things we could find autographed by celebrities.

1. A Toilet Seat

According to the eBayer who put up this item for sale, Sister Hazel performed a concert at Wingate University a while back. At some point, they needed to use the bathroom, and the eBayer’s apartment was nearby—so as a thank you, they signed his toilet seat. As of the time of this writing, the item is going for $58.50, but there are still four days left for the price to skyrocket.

2. A Dog

NASCAR racer Kasey Kahne says he "thought it was weird to sign a dog. He didn't have much hair, so [I was] signing his back—that was kind of odd." 

3. A Twinkie

What’s weirder than autographing a sealed Twinkie? Going on eBay to bid on a Twinkie you already autographed. But that’s what baseball player David Price did after the Hostess shutdown in 2012. While Yahoo News doesn’t have a report on whether or not the pitcher actually won the Twinkie, or even if he actually bid on it (the final bid ended at $56), he did say in his Twitter account that if he won the item, he would save it and give it to his kids at some point. I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of any more meaningful thing for a father to give his child than a Twinkie he signed.

When asked if that was the weirdest thing he ever signed, Price said that honor went to a baby’s forehead.

4. A Grilled Cheese

Los Angeles Kings (and Team USA) goalie Jonathan Quick says someone once asked him to sign a grilled cheese sandwich. "It wouldn't be that bad if it was still intact, but there were two bites taken out of it, and he handed it to me," Quick said. "There was still saliva on it. So that was kinda weird."

5. Babies

As it turns out, people asking professional athletes to sign their babies isn’t as rare as you might think. Here’s a photo from @NBASummerLeague of NBA player Nate Robinson signing one, though I suppose he should be glad it’s only the kid’s back.

According to basketball player Marcin Gortat, “I recently signed a forehead of a freshly born baby, which was ridiculous. And I said, ‘Why would you want to do that?’ and the lady said, ‘It’s gonna be a sign he’s gonna be a basketball player.’ So, for some reason, I don’t know why I signed it, why I did it, I felt bad for this kid. But at the end of the day I realized I would never do this again.” Probably a good policy.

6. A Fast Food Container

Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco autographs a lot of stuff. But the weirdest, he says, was a Filet-O-Fish box from McDonald's.

7. A Diaper

For those who want the powers and prowess of a top athlete to wear off on their infant, but don’t want their babies to be signed directly, there’s always diapers. And during the last Olympic games, one lucky fan was able to win a diaper autographed by U.S. Olympic goldmedalistsr Noelle Pikus-Pace and Chad Hedrick courtesy of And Twins Make 5. No word on whether or not the winner actually used the diaper on their baby or not.

8. A Tampon

You might not have ever heard of The FP and you might not ever see the movie. But while the filmmakers, the Trost Bros., may not be household names, there’s still a reason you might care about their autographs—they come on a tampon when you buy the DVD from Drafthouse films. Apparently, there’s a meaningful scene in the movie involving a tampon.

9. A Jock Strap

Rugby player Ben Cohen once signed a jock strap, but that’s not quite as dirty as it sounds—he signed it for a charity auction to support GMFA, a gay men’s health charity in Britain. The jock strap must have garnered some good interest because it went for $460.

10. Underwear

Speaking of undergarments, Baseball Hall of Famer Jim Palmer once signed a pair of underwear (unworn, though), which were sold on eBay last August. In case you’re wondering how much a pair of autographed tighty-whiteys can go for, these specific ones sold for $69.99.

11. A Leather Whip

Hockey player Karl Alzner of the Washington Capitals says he was once asked to sign a woman’s leather whip. "It was odd," he said. "I don’t know what it was for and I don’t want to think about it."

12. A Sock

You have to be a real fan to want a sock signed by your favorite athlete. Oddly, professional wrestler Mick Foley actually autographed a number socks at one point—enough to have them individually numbered and sold on the Walmart website.

Foley’s socks were new though, but a recent eBay auction had a listing for a game-worn autographed sock from NHL player John McIntyre. Apparently even the most diehard fans know how bad a sock shoved in hockey skates for a whole game will smell, because this one-of-a-kind piece of sports memorabilia only went for $21.

13. A Vibrator

Lots of ladies love Sons of Anarchy star Charlie Hunnam, but only one of them was happy to have him sign their vibrator and post a photo of it on Tumblr. If you’re wondering what an actor might write on such an item, Charlie scribbled out “Have Fun." For the sake of being SFW, I’m going to omit this image, but if you want to see him autographic the item in question or the finished signature, just visit the River of Life Tumblr link here.

14. A Prosthetic Leg

Mark McGwire, one of the all-time home run hitting champions of baseball, once signed a fan’s prosthetic leg.

15. A Car Dashboard

San Jose Sharks' Dan Boyle once autographed the dashboard of a car for a fan—and not just any car, but a really nice, expensive one. "It was like, an Aston Martin or something," he said.

Swear Off Toilet Paper With This Bidet Toilet Seat That's Easy to Install and Costs Less Than $100

Tushy
Tushy

The recent coronavirus-related toilet paper shortage has put the spotlight on the TP-less alternative that Americans have yet to truly embrace: the bidet.

It's not exactly a secret that toilet paper is wasteful—it's estimated to cost 437 billion gallons of water and 15 million trees to produce our yearly supply of the stuff. But while the numbers are plain to see, bidets still aren't common in the United States.

Well, if price was ever the biggest barrier standing in the way of swearing off toilet paper for good, there's now a cost-effective way to make the switch. Right now, you can get the space-saving Tushy bidet for less than $100. And you'll be able to install it yourself in just 10 minutes.

What is a Bidet?

Before we go any further, let’s just go ahead and get the awkward technical details out of the way. Instead of using toilet paper after going to the bathroom, bidets get you clean by using a stream of concentrated water that comes out of a faucet or nozzle. Traditional bidets look like weird toilets without tanks or lids, and while they’re pretty uncommon in the United States, you’ve definitely seen one if you’ve ever been to Europe or Asia.

That said, bidets aren’t just good for your butt. When you reduce toilet paper usage, you also reduce the amount of chemicals and emissions required to produce it, which is good for the environment. At the same time, you’re also saving money. So this is a huge win-win.

Unfortunately, traditional bidets are not an option for most Americans because they take up a lot of bathroom space and require extra plumbing. That’s where Tushy comes in.

The Tushy Classic Bidet Toilet Seat.

Unlike traditional bidets, the Tushy bidet doesn’t take up any extra space in your bathroom. It’s an attachment for your existing toilet that places an adjustable self-cleaning nozzle at the back of the bowl, just underneath the seat. But it doesn’t require any additional plumbing or electricity. All you have to do is remove the seat from your toilet, connect the Tushy to the clean water supply behind the toilet, and replace the seat on top of the Tushy attachment.

The Tushy has a control panel that lets you adjust the angle and pressure of the water stream for a perfect custom clean. The nozzle lowers when the Tushy is activated and retracts into its housing when not in use, keeping it clean and sanitary.

Like all bidets, the Tushy system takes a little getting used to. But once you get the hang of it, you’ll never want to use toilet paper again. In fact, Tushy is so sure you’ll love their product, they offer customers a 60-day risk-free guarantee. If you don’t love your Tushy, you can send it back for a full refund, minus shipping and handling.

Normally, the Tushy Classic retails for $109, but right now you can get the Tushy Classic for just $89. So if you’ve been thinking about going TP-free, now is definitely the time to do it.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

The World's 10 Richest Cities

New York City.
New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

When a city has vibrant culture, a booming economy, and appealing real estate, it attracts a lot of high-profile residents. To see which world-class cities have the largest populations of wealthy individuals, check out this list of the richest cities in the world.

As CNBC reports, the United States is home to several wealthy cities, accounting for six of the urban centers in the top 10. New York takes the top slot, with 120,605 of the people living there boasting a net worth of $5 million or more. That's more than 4 percent of the global wealth population.

It's followed by Tokyo, where 81,645 residents have a net worth totaling at least $5 million. Hong Kong ranks third with 73,430 wealthy citizens. Other U.S. cities on the list include Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., and Dallas. The other two cities in the top 10—London and Paris—are Europe's only representation.

The information used to compile the list comes from the data firm Wealth-X, which looked at global wealth statistics from the past decade. Cities that attract wealthy residents tend to have a high cost of living, but the richest cities in the world aren't always the most expensive to live in. After reading the list below, compare it to the 10 most expensive cities in the world.

  1. New York City, U.S.
  1. Tokyo, Japan
  1. Hong Kong
  1. Los Angeles, U.S.
  1. London, UK
  1. Paris, France
  1. Chicago, U.S.
  1. San Francisco, U.S.
  1. Washington, D.C., U.S.
  1. Dallas, U.S.

[h/t CNBC]