The Honey Smacks In Your Pantry May Be Contaminated With Salmonella

Doc_Brown, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Cropped.
Doc_Brown, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Cropped.

Salmonella, a bacterial food-borne illness often associated with raw eggs and undercooked chicken, has been linked to a popular children's cereal. According to the BBC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging consumers to avoid Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, citing the brand as the likely cause of the Salmonella outbreak spreading across the U.S.

Since early March, 100 people in 33 states have contracted the virus. News of the cereal's potential contamination first broke in June, when the CDC advised consumers to throw away all boxes of Honey Smacks regardless of size or "best by" date. As of June 14, 73 people in 31 states had already fallen ill with salmonella poisoning.

The CDC writes on its website that "Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is the likely source of this multistate outbreak." On June 14, the Kellogg Company has recalled its 15.3-ounce and 23-ounce boxes of Honey Smacks printed with any "best if used by" date between June 14, 2018 and June 14, 2019 (recalled boxes are labeled on the bottom with the UPC codes 3800039103 or 3800014810).

But the recall hasn't succeeded in containing the illness: It's infected 27 new people since the last update and spread to two new states, Florida and Colorado. The new developments prompted the CDC to issue a forceful warning on Twitter on July 12: "Do not eat this Cereal."

Symptoms of Salmonella include diarrhea, fever, headache, and abdominal pain, and usually appear 12 hours to three days after the contaminated food is ingested. The infection clears up in most people on its own, but in some cases it can lead to hospitalization or even death. So far, 30 people have been hospitalized with zero deaths reported. Of the 65 patients who were questioned, 55 remembered eating cold cereal, and 43 people specifically cited Honey Smacks.

If you haven't checked your cereal shelf yet, scan it for Honey Smacks the next chance you get. The CDC advises tossing it out even if a member of your household has already eaten from the box without getting sick.

[h/t BBC]

Toys “R” Us Is Officially Back in Business

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For people who grew up roaming endless rows of action figures and testing go-karts at Toys “R” Us, the news of its closing last year felt a little like the official end of childhood.

But we have good news for kids—and kids at heart—everywhere: Toys “R” Us is back in business. And it just opened its first new store at the Westfield Garden State Plaza mall in Paramus, New Jersey. A similar store will open in Houston, Texas in early December.

According to NJ.com, Tru Kids Brands purchased the company’s liquidated assets at an auction last October, and they’ve teamed up with “experiential retailer” b8ta to create smaller, more creative brick-and-mortar stores. At about 6500 square feet, the Paramus store is much more streamlined than the former 40,000-square-foot warehouse-like models.

“Much smaller, but this store is packed with product, packed with amazing brands, packed with innovation, great technology,” Tru Kids Brands CEO Richard Barry said at the grand opening.

That innovation comes in the form of eye-catching toy displays, touch screens, a “Play-a-Round Theater” space for kids to entertain themselves while their parents shop, and even “Geoffrey’s Tree House,” a playhouse at the center of the store, complete with a winding staircase.

In addition to classics like LEGO, Nintendo, and Nerf, the store also features some newer brands, like Paw Patrol, that you won’t recognize from your original adventures as a Toys “R” Us kid.

The experiential establishments aren’t the only way Tru Kids is trying to revive the former toy store—they also recently relaunched the Toys “R” Us website, which now reroutes consumers to Target’s website, where they can complete their purchases.

Inspired to pull your old Hot Wheels and Furbies out of storage to relive their glory days? Not a bad idea, since some of them could be worth a fortune.

[h/t NJ.com]

Warning: That $75 Costco Coupon Circulating on Facebook Is a Scam

AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images
AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images

The promise of $75 to spend at Costco—especially mere weeks from Thanksgiving—is understandably hard to pass up, so it’s no surprise that a coupon advertising just that has been circulating on Facebook for the past several days.

However, ABC7 reports that Costco took to Facebook to set the record straight: It’s a scam. “While we love our fans and our members,” the company said in a post, “this offer is a SCAM, and in no way affiliated with Costco.”

According to Snopes.com, users who click the link to get the coupon are taken to website pages, which are not operated by Costco, that ask them to share their name, address, email address, date of birth, phone number, complete several surveys, and register for “Reward Offers,” which might entail filling out a credit card application or signing up for a subscription service.

With hindsight bias, the operation definitely seems suspicious—but the information it requires really isn’t much different than what we’re used to sharing on the internet. Plenty of companies offer similar coupons that you can claim through social media, and you’ve probably entered your credit card information for at least a free trial or two. Plus, when you’re accustomed to scrolling through your Facebook feed about as fast as your thumbs can go, it’s not hard to overlook the misspelled words or shoddy logos that should be red flags.

If you’ve already clicked on the fake Costco coupon or think you’ve been targeted by phishing or scamming, the company recommends that you contact costcocare@costco.com or report the attempt to the Federal Trade Commission here.

Worried you might be an easy target for cyber scams? Check out these seven pieces of personal information you should think twice about sharing on social media.

[h/t ABC7]

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