14 Facts About Margaret Sanger

Harris and Ewing, Library of Congress
Harris and Ewing, Library of Congress

Born in 1879, activist Margaret Sanger sparked both revolution and controversy when she began pushing for legalized access to birth control and founded the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Sanger remains a controversial figure even today, more than 50 years after her death.

1. SHE BLAMED HER FATHER FOR HER MOTHER'S DEATH.

Sanger was born Margaret Louise Higgins, the sixth of 11 children. Her mother, Anne Purcell Higgins, also had seven miscarriages, for a grand total of 18 pregnancies within 22 years. She suffered from poor health for much of that time, and when Anne died of tuberculosis at age 50, Margaret was just 19 years old. According to TIME Magazine, Margaret confronted her father at her mother's coffin and said, "You caused this. Mother is dead from having too many children."

2. SHE WANTED TO BE A DOCTOR.

Harris and Ewing, Library of Congress

Sadly, medical school was too expensive, so instead she entered a probationary nursing program in 1900. In early 1902, she met architect William Sanger. The two got married later that year and moved to Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, a suburb about 20 miles away from New York City. They had three children.

3. HER HOUSE CAUGHT FIRE, LEADING HER TO MOVE TO THE CITY.

After the Sangers' house in Hastings-on-Hudson caught fire, Sanger stopped enjoying life in the suburbs. By 1911 the couple had decided to start a new life in Greenwich Village, where Sanger joined the Women's Committee of the New York Socialist Party. There, she met fellow radicals and reformers—like novelist Upton Sinclair, anarchist Emma Goldman, art patron Mabel Dodge Luhan, and intellectual Max Eastman—who supported her ambitions to help working women.

In New York City, Sanger decided to jump back into her career by working as a visiting nurse in the Lower East Side tenements. She often treated women who attempted to give themselves abortions because they didn't have the money to care for another child. Dismayed by the poor health and poverty she saw among immigrants there, she developed opinions that would later lead to her advocacy for birth control.

4. SHE BELIEVED BIRTH CONTROL WAS A FREE SPEECH ISSUE.

Soon after arriving in Greenwich Village, Sanger began writing sex education columns for the New York Call, a socialist newspaper. Her frank discussion of women's sexuality and reproduction offended some readers. In 1913, politician and post office official Anthony Comstock censored her column because he considered her usage of words like syphilis and gonorrhea too vulgar.

A year after her column in the New York Call was banned, Sanger launched The Woman Rebel, an eight-page monthly newsletter advocating contraceptive use. Operating under the slogan "No gods, no masters," Sanger used the newsletter to openly defy Comstock's eponymous 1873 laws. (The Comstock laws made it illegal to use the United States Postal Service to send anything containing information about contraceptives or anything else deemed obscene.) She was indicted in August 1914, but she fled to Europe to avoid arrest. She would eventually return to the United States to face trial, but in February 1916 the prosecution dropped the charges.

5. SHE WAS AGAINST ABORTION.

Despite her advocacy for family limitation, Sanger disliked the idea of abortion. She believed proper education and legalized contraceptives would reduce the need for the procedure. In her 1938 autobiography, Sanger described her experience treating Sadie Sachs, one of the women in the East Side tenements. In 1912, Sachs's husband called for Sanger's help after he found Sachs unconscious from a self-induced abortion. After three weeks of treatment from both Sanger and a local doctor, the only advice the doctor could offer Sachs was to avoid "any more such capers" and have her husband sleep on the roof.

Three months later, Sachs became comatose from another self-induced abortion, and Sachs's husband again reached out to Sanger for help. The woman died within 10 minutes of Sanger's arrival. Frustrated by the lack of resources and information available to lower-class women, Sanger resolved to make changes. From that time forward, she wrote, she wanted to "do something to change the destiny of mothers whose miseries were as vast as the skies."

6. SHE POPULARIZED THE TERM BIRTH CONTROL.

Sanger is often credited for coining the term, but that honor actually goes to Robert Parker, a friend of hers who helped create The Woman Rebel. In her 1979 biography on Sanger, author Madeline Gray described Parker as a polio victim who studied yoga with the hopes of gaining more control over his partly paralyzed hand. Gray wrote:

"It occurred to him that control might apply to birth as well. 'Birth control,' he mused. 'Birth control … I think I like it.' They all liked it. As they put on their hats and left, they agreed that birth control was the best name for the movement."

Otto Bobsien, another of Sanger's colleagues, was the first to use the term to proclaim the start of the Birth Control League of America, a new organization he later said "never had more than a nominal existence." In 1915, when Sanger was away in Europe, Bobsien joined the National Birth Control League and offered the fledgling organization use of the movement's new name. When Sanger returned from Europe later that year, she helped popularize the term, considering it more straightforward than phrases like "family limitation."

7. SHE OPENED THE FIRST BIRTH CONTROL CLINIC IN THE U.S.

Sanger outside of her trial on January 30, 1917.Bain News Service, Library of Congress

In October 1916, Margaret Sanger opened a birth control clinic in Brooklyn with the help of her sister, Ethel Byrne, and interpreter Fania Mindell. It was the first of its kind in the U.S., and she modeled it after a Dutch clinic she had visited while evading American police. In the Netherlands, Sanger had learned about pessaries and diaphragms and became convinced they were more effective than the suppositories and douches she promoted in the United States. Sanger brought that new knowledge to her Brooklyn clinic, which served more than 100 women on its first day. For a cover charge of 10 cents, Sanger gave every woman a pamphlet of her New York Call column on "What Every Girl Should Know," a lecture on the female reproductive system, and instructions on several types of contraceptive use. The clinic closed just nine days later when Sanger was once again arrested for violating the Comstock laws. Sanger immediately attempted to reopen the clinic after being released on bail, but, as she wrote, she was promptly re-arrested and charged as a public nuisance.

8. SHE ONCE TOLD A JUDGE SHE COULDN'T RESPECT EXISTING LAWS.

Sanger and Byrne's court trials began in January 1917. Sanger's sister was tried first and sentenced to 30 days in a workhouse, but she immediately went on a hunger strike; Byrne fasted for a week before being force-fed by prison staff. When Sanger went to trial on January 29, she was supported in court by several Greenwich Village socialites and about 50 of the women she'd treated in the Brooklyn clinic. Presiding Justice John J. Freschi offered her a lenient sentence if she promised to obey the law, but Sanger responded by saying, "I cannot respect the law as it exists today." Sanger was found guilty and Freschi also sentenced her to 30 days in a prison workhouse.

In 1918, Sanger appealed the court decision and won a victory for the birth control movement. Although the court upheld Sanger's conviction and she still had to serve her 30 day sentence, Judge Frederick E. Crane of the New York Court of Appeals also ruled that doctors could prescribe contraceptives and disseminate information about birth control under certain conditions. Sanger ran with the new loophole in 1923, when she established a new clinic staffed largely by female doctors. The new clinic operated alongside the American Birth Control League. Almost two decades later, in 1939, the league and the clinic merged, forming the Birth Control Federation of America, and in 1942 this new organization officially became known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

9. THE ROCKEFELLERS ANONYMOUSLY SUPPORTED HER CAUSE.

In the mid-1920s, John D. Rockefeller Jr. anonymously donated $10,000 to the American Birth Control League to fund research into contraceptives. Rockefeller's son, John D. Rockefeller III, continued his father's early support of Sanger's work, albeit more publicly. The Rockefeller Brothers Fund donated money to Planned Parenthood until 1981, when it decided to start funding agricultural research—which was decidedly less controversial—instead.

10. LIKE MANY WELL-KNOWN INTELLECTUALS OF HER DAY, SANGER SUPPORTED EUGENICS.

Many historians believe Sanger's support of eugenics was part strategic and part ideological. Sir Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin's, initiated the Western eugenics movement by suggesting that traits like "talent and character" could be passed down to children through intentional breeding. Several British and American academics latched onto the idea, including figures like Theodore Roosevelt, John D. Rockefeller Jr., and Alexander Graham Bell. Sanger's support for sterilizing the diseased and "feebleminded" legitimized the birth control movement by aligning her ideas with those of contemporary intellectuals.

Sanger's belief in eugenics was a little different from other intellectuals', though. Eugenicists, she said, believed a woman's first duty should be to the state, and that all "fit" women should bear children. Sanger, on the other hand, thought a woman's first duty should be to herself. She contended the primary reason for birth control was to prevent pregnancies among women who couldn't support a child financially. Sanger believed her ideal of economic eugenics was morally superior to the views posed by traditional eugenicists.

The modern-day Planned Parenthood doesn’t hide Sanger's controversial support of the eugenics movement, but it doesn't endorse it, either. In a document published in 2016 [PDF], the organization said, "We believe that [those ideas] are wrong. Furthermore, we hope that this acknowledgement fosters an open conversation on racism and ableism—both inside and out of our organization."

11. HER BOOKS WERE AMONG THE FIRST BURNED BY NAZIS.

In May 1933, Nazis sanctioned the burning of more than 25,000 books deemed "un-German." Sanger had published at least nine books by that point, and they were all among that number, as were titles by Jack London, Ernest Hemingway, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, and dozens of others. Sanger's books, which advocated for women's choice in everything from childbirth to politics, directly contradicted everything the Third Reich believed. Adolf Hitler supported traditional gender roles and wanted to maintain high birth rates, ideas Sanger decried in her books.

12. HER NIECE WAS PART OF THE INSPIRATION FOR WONDER WOMAN.

Tom Simpson, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Olive Byrne, Sanger's niece, was involved in a polyamorous relationship with Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston and his wife, Elizabeth Holloway Marston. Marston credited both Olive and Elizabeth as his muses, according to historian Jill Lepore. In her 2014 book The Secret History of Wonder Woman, Lepore wrote that Marston based part of Wonder Woman's costume on the silver bracelets Olive often wore. Lepore also suggested Sanger herself may have been an influence on the popular comic book character. Feminist movements in the early 1900s often symbolized female oppression with chains, and Sanger was quick to adopt such symbolism with books like Motherhood in Bondage. Wonder Woman's use of chains and ropes as weapons echoed Sanger's vision for female liberation.

13. SHE WAS NOMINATED FOR THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE 31 TIMES.

Margaret Sanger received 31 nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize between 1953 and 1963. In 1960 alone, she received 20 nominations from 16 university professors and four members of India's parliament (Sanger took several trips to India, where she worked with people like Gandhi to discuss birth control).

14. SHE LIVED JUST LONG ENOUGH TO SEE HER LIFE'S WORK COME TO FRUITION.

H. William Tetlow, Fox Photos/Getty Images

Two important legal milestones happened after Sanger founded the American Birth Control League in 1921. In December 1936, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals effectively overturned all federal restrictions on birth control, making it legal for doctors throughout the United States to provide access to contraception. On the state level, contraception was legal in some form or another everywhere except Connecticut, Mississippi, and Massachusetts. In 1965, Griswold v. Connecticut overturned the state laws preventing married women from accessing birth control. Griswold v. Connecticut later served as precedent for cases like Eisenstadt v. Baird (1972), which gave unmarried couples unrestricted access to contraception; Roe v. Wade (1973), which legalized abortion; and Carey v. Population Services International (1977), which made it legal for doctors and pharmacists to distribute contraceptives to minors.

Sanger died on September 6, 1966, about a year after the Supreme Court decided on Griswold v. Connecticut. The next day, Alaska Senator Ernest Gruening spoke about Sanger in Congress. In an address to the president, Gruening said Sanger was "a great woman, a courageous and indomitable person who lived to see one of the most remarkable revolutions of modern times—a revolution which her torch kindled."

Kodak’s New Cameras Don't Just Take Photos—They Also Print Them

Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Kodak

Snapping a photo and immediately sharing it on social media is definitely convenient, but there’s still something so satisfying about having the printed photo—like you’re actually holding the memory in your hands. Kodak’s new STEP cameras now offer the best of both worlds.

As its name implies, the Kodak STEP Instant Print Digital Camera, available for $70 on Amazon, lets you take a picture and print it out on that very same device. Not only do you get to skip the irksome process of uploading photos to your computer and printing them on your bulky, non-portable printer (or worse yet, having to wait for your local pharmacy to print them for you), but you never need to bother with ink cartridges or toner, either. The Kodak STEP comes with special 2-inch-by-3-inch printing paper inlaid with color crystals that bring your image to life. There’s also an adhesive layer on the back, so you can easily stick your photos to laptop covers, scrapbooks, or whatever else could use a little adornment.

There's a 10-second self-timer, so you don't have to ask strangers to take your group photos.Kodak

For those of you who want to give your photos some added flair, you might like the Kodak STEP Touch, available for $130 from Amazon. It’s similar to the regular Kodak STEP, but the LCD touch screen allows you to edit your photos before you print them; you can also shoot short videos and even share your content straight to social media.

If you want to print photos from your smartphone gallery, there's the Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer. This portable $80 printer connects to any iOS or Android device with Bluetooth capabilities and can print whatever photos you send to it.

The Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer connects to an app that allows you to add filters and other effects to your photos. Kodak

All three Kodak STEP devices come with some of that magical printer paper, but you can order additional refills, too—a 20-sheet set costs $8 on Amazon.

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16 Facts About The Other Guys On Its 10th Anniversary, Courtesy of Adam McKay

Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell star in Adam McKay's The Other Guys (2010).
Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell star in Adam McKay's The Other Guys (2010).
Macall Polay/Columbia TriStar Marketing Group, Inc.

August marks the 10th anniversary of The Other Guys, director Adam McKay’s send-up, and tribute, to the buddy cop movies that have been a Hollywood mainstay for decades. Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg play Detectives Allen Gamble and Terry Hoitz, two disgraced and otherwise dismissed desk jockeys who inadvertently uncover a massive financial scandal at the exact moment when corporate malfeasance begins grabbing overdue newspaper headlines. The duo’s comic chemistry thrives on Ferrell’s bookish awkwardness juxtaposed with Wahlberg’s macho exasperation, while McKay (working with writer Chris Henchy) exercises a growing social consciousness against the backdrop of one of cinema’s most familiar and durable genres. Supporting performances by Eva Mendes, Michael Keaton, and Steve Coogan, plus cameos by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and Samuel L. Jackson (not to mention a murderer’s row of up-and-coming comedians and improvisers) breathe unforgettable life into an escalating series of side-splitting scenarios.

McKay’s most vivid memory of the shoot, he tells Mental Floss, was of the cinematic and gastronomic indulgence he enjoyed shooting a (for him) robustly-budgeted action movie in New York City. “I think I put on literally 25 pounds during that shoot,” he says. “At the end, my wife just looked at me and was like, 'You look as big as a house.' I mean, some days my body would hurt from laughing all day, and then I just ate like chicken parm sandwiches and pizza.

"That's the closest I've come to a full-on decadent Hollywood movie," McKay continues. "We had a really big budget. We were in New York City. We had cars blowing up. We had all these big actors everywhere. It's still, by the way, a budget that's probably half of a Marvel movie or a Michael Bay movie. But that's the closest I've ever come to feeling like Tony Scott and that kind of world."

Exclusive to Mental Floss, check out these behind-the-scenes tidbits and trivia from the making of The Other Guys, straight from McKay himself.

1. The Other Guys started with the unlikely pairing of Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell—as dinner companions.

"We went to a little Italian place off Santa Monica and the energy between the two of them was really funny," McKay recalled of what kicked off the idea for Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg's on-screen pairing. "Mark's a Boston guy, athlete, tough, boxer; Will's big—Will's 6-foot-3 and definitely an athlete and no pushover—but at the same time, at root, kind of a sweetheart. And they just had a funny dynamic between them. I kept laughing the whole night. And that was really what launched it."

2. Adam McKay didn’t set out to make The Other Guys a parody, but Hollywood quickly taught him not to edge too closely to familiar properties.

Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell are The Other Guys (2010).Macall Polay/Columbia TriStar Marketing Group, Inc.

"There was some movie that came out about two 'star' cops. And I jokingly said, 'We should do the movie about the cops in the background of the star cops,'" McKay says. "Because they were doing an A-Team movie, I said, 'We should call ours The B-Team.' We may have even announced the movie as that, and someone back-channeled us, like, 'By the way, don't call your movie The B-Team. We're not going to sue you, but like, just don't do that.'"

3. As appealing as it was to send up buddy-cop movie conventions, then- (and still-) current events helped solidify The Other Guys's themes.

"The other big component was that the financial collapse was actively happening," McKay says of the timing of The Other Guys. "We kept talking about how you can't do a jeopardy plot that’s about drug smugglers—like we'll be looking back wistfully at the days of drug smugglers and safe crackers and bank robbers. And so a big part of it was: How do you do a modern cop buddy film when banks have disappeared trillions of dollars and millions of people have lost their homes through this kind of bureaucratic malfeasance? And that launched Ferrell’s character, a forensic accountant into paperwork—and the idea was that the new cop heroes are going to be bureaucrats who are into paperwork."

4. Michael Keaton’s repeated TLC references were written into The Other Guys script, though Adam McKay wasn't sure how well the running joke would translate.

A running joke in The Other Guys has Michael Keaton's Captain Gene continually quoting TLC songs. "We had done a couple readings of the script where it played really well, not that that means it's going to play funny in the final movie," McKay says. "We've had bits that killed in read-throughs, and then they go in the final cut and something about the rhythm just doesn't work. We were fairly confident in that joke. There are other times though where you do discover the bit and you're improvising, you're throwing out alternatives, the actors are playing around, and you discover a bit. Then I'll turn to Kate Hardman, our script supervisor and say, 'Alright, we’ve got to keep that one alive.' And then in future scenes, she would remind me, 'Remember, you had this joke you wanted to keep alive' and I'll get one take where we do it."

5. Dirty Mike and the Boys, on the other hand, were not in the original script.

"Rob Huebel improvised the line 'soup kitchen' and we kept joking about Dirty Mike and The Boys. The scene where I show up with our DP Oliver Wood, [our property master] Jimmy Mazzola, and our producer Pat Crowley, and we're Dirty Mike and the Boys, was not scripted," McKay explains. "That came out of us loving Huebel’s improv so much that we knew we had to put Dirty Mike and the Boys in the movie. That was a perfect example where improv spawned a bit that ended up running through the movie."

6. The scene involving Allen’s ex-girlfriend “Christinith” was inspired not just by the particular way some people spell or pronounce their names, but by their annoyance when it's mispronounced.

"Obviously it was a running joke that very beautiful women love Allen Gamble," McKay says. "And we were joking about people through the years who have names they want pronounced a certain way and they're oddly hostile about it. There was someone we'd known who was named Anna, but she wanted to be called 'Ana,' and if you called her Anna, she would get mad and I'd be like, 'Wait a minute, what? You can't get mad about that.' So that was where the Christinith joke came from."

7. Will Ferrell’s “Gator” alter ego in The Other Guys was created to further develop the film’s “paper-pushers as heroes” idea.

"The character [Allen] was a guy who appears very mousy and very beta and quiet and we just kept kicking around the idea of: What's power now? What's a hero now? And we had this idea that the reason that Allen Gamble was so conservative and buttoned-down was that he had kind of let his power out once before and it hadn't gone very well," McKay explained of the many dichotomies of Ferrell's character. "And then we just started laughing about the idea that he became a pimp and didn't realize it. So that was the joke—the idea that he’s like, 'No, no, no, I'm helping them run a dating service.' 'No, you were a pimp.' And the lifestyle pulling him down without him really realizing what he's become. The thing that makes me laugh the hardest is when he's first talking to the girl in college, she's just going, 'I could go on dates with guys.' 'Oh yeah. I can make sure to collect the money.' It’s so innocent."

8. Adam McKay and his collaborators refined a unique technical process leading up to The Other Guys to keep track of the many variations attempted, and often improvised, during production.

"Brent White, the editor on The Other Guys, has this great system where you can go to each line of the script and click it and all the alt versions of it will be underneath it," McKay explains. "That was really a breakthrough, and once he really got that system going, it changed a lot of things. Every version, every permutation of the joke is right in front of you, and it made the whole thing easier to sort."

9. The Other Guys composer Jon Brion is a musical chameleon, but Adam McKay didn’t direct him to draw on the sound of, say, Michael Kamen’s Lethal Weapon scores for Allen and Terry’s themes.

"A lot of movies I did with Will are always kind of in between an original story and a parody," McKay says. "We want them to be original, but they're clearly messing around with the tropes of the genre that you're used to. So the trick was I wanted it to sound like a cop score, but I also wanted it to be good. So we kept kind of batting that around."

10. The Oscar-worthy end credits song “Pimps Don’t Cry” emerged from a need for actress Eva Mendes to have a melody to sing, and Jon Brion’s chops corralling heavy hitters for a comedy-soul classic.

Will Ferrell and Eva Mendes in The Other Guys (2010).Macall Polay/Columbia TriStar Marketing Group, Inc.

"We just wrote 'Pimps Don't Cry' for the scene," McKay explains. "When [Eva Mendes] sang it, we're like, wait a minute, can we record this? And, of course, Jon Brion knows everyone and has access to studios. So before you know it, we had CeeLo Green in there and it turned out Eva Mendes could sing. We recorded a whole track and I think even shot a video. But it came out of the scene. The actors were like, 'Well, what's the melody?' And we're like, 'Jon, you want to write something?' And then of course I was like, I gotta hear that song!"

11. Adam McKay explored the idea of Pop-Up Video-style detours in The Other Guys, but couldn’t figure out how to pull it off in the pre-streaming era.

"We had a thing that we were going to try and do in the movie where we would freeze-frame scenes and then a little box would pop out and show something from a couple months later. That was a style that was written into the script we had happening a bunch of times, and we could not get it to work. It's funny because now I know how I would do it, but at that time we just couldn't [make it work]."

12. The Other Guys's planned “flash-forward” scenes also included future President Donald Trump, whose Trump Tower gets blown up in the opening scene.

Future president Donald Trump filmed a cameo for The Other Guys, but it didn't make the final cut. "Donald Trump just basically wants to get paid," McKay says. "So if you show up and you write out a check for a certain amount of money, I can't remember what the amount was, $75,000 or $100,000 or something, he'll do it. Pretty much anyone could go to him and be like, 'Here's a check for $75,000,' and he will do it. Never in a trillion years imagining the guy would become president. He sort of was a New York joke for years, and Trump Tower was kind of known as being this cheeseball place, so it was a pure joke. But when we put it in the movie, we were like, 'Donald Trump’s so cheesy and cheap, let's not put this in the movie.' Even for the silly movie we were doing, it felt cheeseball, so we ended up cutting it out."

13. If there was a scene in The Other Guys that gave Adam McKay the “tingle in his balls” as a filmmaker that Allen and Terry feel while pursuing bad guys, it was the “Aim for the bushes” scene that sets up the whole film.

"I mean, that's one of my all-time favorite moments from anything I've ever been involved in," McKay says of his favorite scene. "I would say the family prayer scene in Talladega Nights, the Jenga tower scene in The Big Short, the other one was in Anchorman, when Jack Black kicks the dog off the bridge where the audience made this weird sound and were so stunned by it. And then Danson and Highsmith jumping off the building —oh my god, I had so much fun watching that with test audiences. No one saw it coming.

"[The Rock and Samuel L. Jackson] are such big stars that just in a million years, no one imagined it. When the guys were falling off the tower, they were so convinced they weren't going to die. You would hear people in the audience go, 'Yeah right, they would never survive that.' But when they hit, there was such a collective inhale from the whole audience, and then just explosion of laughter. But the other great moment for that was when I was in the edit with Erica Weis, our music editor and music supervisor, and we discovered the Foo Fighters song for that moment. It was just so perfectly over-the-top and a little cheesy, yet plausible. Of course the filmmakers would play this song! The entire puzzle clicked together perfectly when that song went in."

14. Adam McKay credits his executive producer for the coup of recruiting Dwayne Johnson and Samuel L. Jackson as the “star cops” by whose police work Allen and Terry would be measured.

"I give [executive producer] Kevin Messick a lot of credit for that casting," McKay says. "We wanted two big action stars that you would never think would die in a movie, and boy, Kevin really helped us get them. He had some connection to Dwayne Johnson, and he worked the phones to really help us get Sam Jackson. I saw Sam Jackson years later and he's like, 'People keep asking me if we're going to do a spinoff movie with these guys.' I was like, oh man, that could be fun. And Dwayne Johnson told me too he had people come up to him and mention those characters all the time."

15. The original ending to The Other Guys was even more bleak than the statistics that play over the end credits.

"We had this whole ending where like they bust Steve Coogan's character Ershon and they pull the thing together and they take him in and it turns out Congress has changed the laws and what he's done is no longer illegal," McKay explains. "I wish we had ended with that. That would have been a better ending. And then we had this other ending with Derek Jeter, where he comes out and it turns out he's connected to this whole underground thing that's fighting against the big banks. That's in the TV version they air, but it didn't really work ... when I say work, I don't care if the audience loved it. It didn't work for me with the narrative when we a test screened it. So I didn't think we stuck the landing on the ending on it."

16. Adam McKay always worked culturally relevant themes into his films, but The Other Guys galvanized this approach going forward, reflected more prominently in The Big Short and Vice.

Adam McKay on the set of The Other Guys (2010).Macall Polay/Columbia TriStar Marketing Group, Inc.

"Ferrell and I would do these comedies, and we would always have something [else] going on in them," McKay says of his desire to weave bigger themes into his films. "Even Step Brothers was kind of about how consumer culture turns us into big giant children. And the Iraq War was such a horrible tragedy and disaster that right around that time, and that’s when I started thinking, 'I just gotta do some stuff that's more overt.' When the financial collapse hit, it was just like, all bets are off. So yeah, we tried to craft the whole movie like a comedic allegory for the financial collapse. If you look at the movie, they keep ignoring their union. And then there’s a big financier covering losses by taking money from workers. Of course, when the movie came out, no one cared—the movie just played as a comedy. Except for the ending credits, people really didn't catch it at all. Which I don't blame them! I think it was a little bit of an experiment in that sense. And the good news is the movie’s funny and I really love how it turned out."