Human Sacrifice May Have Taken Place at the 'German Stonehenge'

A 2016 reconstruction of Pӧmmelte, a henge-like structure in eastern Germany that was originally constructed about 4300 years ago.
A 2016 reconstruction of Pӧmmelte, a henge-like structure in eastern Germany that was originally constructed about 4300 years ago.
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An ancient circular wooden monument in Germany—similar in age and appearance to England's Stonehenge—may have been a site for human sacrifice.

According to Smithsonian, German archaeologists André Spatzier and François Bertemes excavated a variety of Neolithic and Bronze Age antiquities dating back to the period between 2321 and 2211 BCE from Pӧmmelte, the "German Stonehenge" located in northeastern Germany. Among the broken drinking vessels, stone axes, and animal bones they expected to see (such relics were distinctive of the era’s Bell Beaker culture), researchers also found the dismembered bodies of 10 women and children.

Four bodies showed signs of skull trauma and rib fractures that occurred before death, researchers write in the journal Antiquity. The skeleton of a teenager had tied hands. All 10 bodies were found in positions suggesting they were thrown into the burial shafts.

“It remains unclear whether these individuals were ritually killed or if their death resulted from intergroup conflict, such as raiding,” researchers say in the study.

Those 10 bodies stood in contrast to the nearby graves of 13 men (all between 17 and 30 years old at death), which were buried in a respectful manner. The gender-specific violence and burial differences shown at Pӧmmelte make ritual sacrifice a likely scenario, researchers say.

Spatzier told Live Science that Pӧmmelte was in use for about 300 years before it was destroyed—likely intentionally—around 2050 BCE. The site was discovered in 1991 when aerial photographers spotted it shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

[h/t Smithsonian]

26 Fascinating Facts About Fossils

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

If you’ve never visited the Big Bone Room, you’re in luck. Check out our visit to New York City's American Museum of Natural History for a rundown on fossils, which provide invaluable insight into our understanding of history and its once-living occupants.

In this edition of "The List Show," editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy explains the ins and outs of excavation, fossil follies (extinct giants were a big miss), and the terrorizing prospect of a 3-foot-tall parrot.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

2000-Year-Old Roman Tweezers and Metal Ear Swab Discovered in UK

Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The ancient Romans took hygiene seriously. They pioneered indoor plumbing, deodorant, and the practice of bathing daily. A recent discovery made at a bridge construction site in the UK reinforces just how committed to cleanliness the Roman civilization was. As Geek.com reports, workers unearthed an ear cleaner and a pair of tweezers thought to date back 2000 years to the Roman Empire.

The artifacts were dug up by the Ebbsfleet Development Corporation at the location of the new Springhead Bridge in Ebbsfleet Garden City, a development in Kent. One small tool appears to be designed for pinching and plucking small items just like modern-day tweezers. The other object is thought to have been built for cleaning ears—but instead of cotton, the "swab" is made entirely of metal. They're thought to date back thousands of years, but scientific analysis will need to be done to determine the exact age.

Grooming items weren't the only artifacts uncovered at the site. Workers also found a piece of timber believed to have been meant for an ancient structure. The Ebbsfleet River, where the new bridge is being built, was once a shipping hub and a Roman settlement called Vagniacis. Historical finds are so common in the area that the Ebbsfleet Development Corporation employs full-time archaeologists.

The personal hygiene tools have been removed from the archaeological site by experts who will study them to learn more about their origins. The fate of the artifacts is unclear, but the construction company behind the discovery hopes they can remain in the same city where they were found.

[h/t Geek.com]

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