A Hidden Section of the Berlin Wall Was Just Discovered

iStock
iStock

As Communist-managed barriers go, the Berlin Wall was fairly effective. Erected in 1961 to stop an exodus of citizens in Soviet-controlled East Berlin from defecting to West Berlin, for decades it loomed large over people on both sides as a symbol of the divided political landscape. Roughly 12 feet tall, the concrete slabs were topped with a circular tube that discouraged climbing and was edged on the East Berlin side by a gauntlet of guard dogs, armed patrolmen, and trip-activated machine guns. The Soviets and the West finally eased tensions in 1989, and citizens armed with tiny pickaxes assisted construction workers in tearing it down, allowing East and West Berliners to come and go as they pleased.

Although not every inch of the wall was razed, most people thought all sections had been accounted for: It’s hard to miss a giant monolith of concrete blocking your path, after all. But this past June, a group of locals discovered an abandoned 65.6-foot section.

The slab is situated in a residential neighborhood of northwest Berlin and was determined to be part of the border that helped isolate the “death strip” of the wall from East Berlin. Defectors would scale one wall en route to the other and risked being shot on sight by armed guards. Now covered in graffiti, the chunk was partially obscured by overgrowth and lacked the familiar pipe on top. Over time, it simply began to blend into its surroundings.

This is the second time this year a surviving portion has been unveiled. In January, a 262-foot section was brought to the city’s attention by historian Christian Bormann, who first noticed it in 1999. He kept his finding a secret out of fear it would be torn down.

Ephraim Gothe, a city councilman who was one of the locals out for a stroll when the latest excavated wall was stumbled upon, has filed paperwork in an effort to have it declared a historic monument. If that's successful, it will join other sections that have become tourist destinations, including one 4300-foot long stretch, a wall memorial, and one of the crossing points once open to diplomats. It’s possible other portions survived the teardown and remain obscured somewhere in the city.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

Sign Up Today: Get exclusive deals, product news, reviews, and more with the Mental Floss Smart Shopping newsletter!

A Short, Sweet History of Candy Corn

Love it or hate it, candy corn is here to stay.
Love it or hate it, candy corn is here to stay.
Evan-Amos, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Depending on which survey you happen to be looking at, candy corn is either the best or the worst Halloween candy ever created. If that proves anything, it’s that the tricolor treat is extremely polarizing. But whether you consider candy corn a confectionery abomination or the sweetest part of the spooky season, you can’t deny that it’s an integral part of the holiday—and it’s been around for nearly 150 years.

On this episode of Food History, Mental Floss’s Justin Dodd is tracing candy corn’s long, storied existence all the way back to the 1880s, when confectioner George Renninger started molding buttercream into different shapes—including corn kernels, which he tossed at actual chickens to see if it would fool them. His white-, orange-, and yellow-striped snack eventually caught the attention of Goelitz Confectionery Company (now Jelly Belly), which started mass-producing what was then sometimes called “chicken feed” rather than “candy corn.”

But what exactly is candy corn? Why do we associate it with Halloween? And will it ever disappear? Find answers to these questions and more in the video below.

For more fascinating food history and other videos, subscribe to the Mental Floss YouTube channel here.