20 Facts About Netflix's Ozark

Jason Bateman stars in Ozark.
Jason Bateman stars in Ozark.
Steve Dietl, Netflix

Getting on the wrong side of the wrong people is a classic mistake, but Marty Byrde (Jason Bateman) went ahead and did it anyway—and dragged his family along for the ride. The Netflix series Ozark is a bit like Breaking Bad ... if Walter White had come clean about making drugs early on, and Skyler had been completely on board.

It’s dark and twisty and every success promises a failure. Byrde flees Chicago to get away from a drug cartel, only to run into a drug cartel in his new Missouri home. If that kind of thing happens, you’ve gotta assume you’re the problem.

Here are 20 facts about the latest show about a troubled middle-class white dude, which won Jason Bateman an Emmy for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series in 2019 (for the episode titled "Reparations").

1. Ozark’s co-creator crafted the show with his own memories.

Missouri native and show co-creator Bill Dubuque chose to set Ozark at Lake of the Ozarks because he worked there as a teenager for the Alhonna Resort and Marina. He has a deep love for the place, even if his characters despair at moving to the “Redneck Riviera."

2. Neither Jason Bateman nor Laura Linney was interested in starring in a television series when Ozark came along.

Laura Linney wasn’t interested in doing a series, but she was intrigued because of Jason Bateman’s involvement and the possibility of watching him stretch his acting range. But Bateman almost wasn’t on board because he, too, was uninterested in doing another series when the project came to him. He became a producer on Ozark and directed four episodes (originally he was set to direct all of them until a scheduling conflict popped up) because joining the show meant postponing a foray into feature film directing. The pilot episode—and the chance to do some directing—convinced him to join.

3. Ozark’s creators attempted to get Peter Mullan on board before there was even a script.

Peter Mullan and Jason Bateman in 'Ozark'
Peter Mullan and Jason Bateman in Ozark.
Netflix

Peter Mullan is a fierce character actor—not to mention a writer and director—known for My Name is Joe and smaller, powerful roles like the fascist guard in Children of Men and the wealthy owner of Delos on Westworld. Bateman desperately wanted to cast Mullan in Ozark after seeing him in Jane Campion’s Top of the Lake, so he and the show's creators “aggressively pursued” Mullan before they’d even finished the script.

4. Laura Linney pushed to make her Ozark character more than “just a wife.”

Linney was definitely drawn to the script when she read it, even though she saw her potential character as one that needed more dimensions. There was unrealized potential there because Wendy was “just a wife,” defined entirely by her relationship to Marty. So, she took her concerns to Bateman, who agreed they needed to flesh the character out, and now Wendy is a monster all her own.

5. Marty wears the same shoes every Jason Bateman character does.

If you focus on shoes whenever you're watching a show or movie, you'll probably notice that Jason Bateman wears a lot of New Balance. That's no different in Ozark, where his character is rocking the J. Crew x New Balance M1400DM, which is potentially bad product placement because you can't buy them anywhere.

6. Symbols hidden in the “O” of the Ozark title card foreshadow the episode.

Emerging from the brooding title music, the show teases what you’re about to see with icons embedded in the title’s first letter. A spilled oil drum, a gun, a man on his knees. A rat, a swimming pool ladder, a child’s playground. Designed by Fred Davis and Kellerhouse, the title cards are an ingenious tool in an era where fans are desperate to catch and solve narrative clues. This show primes that pump and offers fans something to search for.

7. Jason Bateman feels bad about killing off characters on Ozark.

Finally, a TV producer who admits to feeling what we all feel. The shocking deaths that keep us hooked to a show are also lamentable. It’s safe to say we miss some characters when they’re gone, and Bateman gets that. “Selfishly, you want everyone to stick around," he told The Hollywood Reporter. "We had a really great group of actors. It’s terrible when these people have to go, but that’s the trade-off of doing these kinds of shows. You have to be willing to make big moves because that’s where everything is at nowadays."

8. Laura Linney has trouble keeping Wendy's moral compass straight on Ozark.

Janet McTeer and Laura Linney in 'Ozark'
Janet McTeer and Laura Linney in Ozark.
Steve Dietl, Netflix

Laura Linney's Wendy has evolved into one of the most complicated characters on the show because of her readiness and capability to take on immoral and illegal actions. It's part of the challenge of knowing where the character is during any given storyline, especially when Linney doesn't know how her story will end. "It really is a partnership between the actor and the writers and the director as well," she told Vanity Fair. "To sort of let things unfold in a way that feels right and is organic so that you don't get too far ahead of yourself or too far behind yourself."

9. Ozark’s production team learned how to launder money from the FBI.

Aside from knowing which side of the dock to approach in your boat, the writers needed to develop an understanding of how money laundering works in real life so they could create a reasonable facsimile in their fictional world. Naturally, they called the feds. “We had an FBI agent who investigates money laundering come and sit down with us for a day so we could pick her brain,” writer Chris Mundy said.

10. Ozark features a few subtle nods to Arrested Development.

Since it covered so much ground and made so many references of its own, it’s probably impossible for Bateman to be involved in anything without noticing some Arrested Development nods. For Ozark, that includes Marty stuffing palates of cash into the walls of the resort (sans banana stand) and waxing intellectual about maritime law (all aboard the Queen Mary!).

11. Julia Garner needed a hand double on Ozark.

Charlie Tahan, Julia Garner, and Carson Holmes in 'Ozark'
Jackson Davis, Netflix

Julia Garner, who won an Emmy in 2019 for playing incipient criminal genius Ruth Langmore, imbues her character with grit and tenacity—but she had to call for backup during a scene involving a mouse because she hates rodents. She was supposed to pick up a mouse and drop it into some water, but she was on the verge of a panic attack, so they got a hand double to do it. “The whole crew was laughing at me,” Garner told W Magazine. “It was so embarrassing, and I couldn’t even lift it."

12. Laura Linney sees her Ozark character as a prism.

Wendy's elusive morality stems from what Linney views as the character's ability to take in new information and conceive of many different courses of action. "I think she is sort of a prism," Linney told NPR. "You can shine something through her, and it goes in a million different directions and it just depends upon, you know, where she is at the moment. I don't think she wants to be a bad person. She wants to be better than she is, but her nature is a little more dubious than she ever knew about herself."

13. Jason Bateman sees Wendy as better equipped to handle all the bad stuff.

Jason Bateman, Laura Linney, and Robert C. Treveiler in 'Ozark' (2017)
Netflix

Maybe that's why Bateman sees his character's spouse as the more capable figure in their illegal schemes. While he called Wendy a "ninja" who has got what it takes to keep going, he also told Deadline that, at the end of season 2, Marty has "reached his limit [of] his ability to cope with things."

14. The characters on Ozark love Canadian football.

They don't call it that on the show, but the clips used in the background for several scenes are from the Canadian Football League. The show has used the same play from a Toronto Argos/Montreal Alouettes game multiple times, which really makes you wonder what cable package the Byrdes have.

15. A Dance Moms star auditioned to play Charlotte on Ozark.

Chloe Lukasiak is best known as one of the original cast members for the reality show Dance Moms, where the children danced and the moms fought, but she also auditioned for the role of the Byrdes' daughter. The role went to Sofia Hublitz, but you can watch Chloe's audition above.

16. The success of Ozark led to the opening of a real-life bar in Missouri.

Just as Atlanta caused a fictional chicken wing order to become real, Ozark has bled into the tourist scene in Missouri. If you're visiting Lake Ozark, Missouri, you can hit up Marty Byrde's Bar and Grill for Del's Nachos, Ruth's Smoked Wings, or Wendy's Philly Steak Sandwich.

17. A real-life robber hid out in the Ozarks.

It's either a coincidence or an improbable story the producers have never talked about in interviews, but Eddie Mahera security truck driver who stole $1.6 million from his own truck—fled to the United States and hid for nearly two decades. At first he and his family settled in Colorado, but they made their way to Ozark, Missouri, which is where his son's wife turned him into authorities. The fake name Maher lived under for years? Stephen King.

18. Ozark is filmed in Atlanta.

Jason Bateman and Laura Linney in 'Ozark'
Steve Dietl, Netflix

Even though the show takes place in the Ozarks and was inspired by the Alhonna Resort, much of the show is filmed near and around Atlanta, Georgia, where a large production industry has bloomed over the last decade. Specifically, Ozark shoots in Eagle Rock Studios for its interior scenes, at Chateau Elan for Del's sprawling estate, and, when they need to hit the water, Lake Altoona, which is about an hour outside of Atlanta.

19. The owner of the real-life resort hopes people realize Ozark is a piece of fiction.

Is a popular show set in your neck of the lake good for tourism? Shirley Gross-Russel hopes so. Her family owns the resort where Ozark is set (the same one where Dubuque worked at as a teen), and although it may not be everyone’s cup of tea to be associated with a story about drug-running, money laundering, and death, Gross-Russel is banking on people knowing that a TV show is just a TV show. Hopefully guests won’t go ripping the walls apart looking for hidden cash.

20. Ozark is probably going to end soon.

With the launch of the third season in March 2020, Bateman revealed that Netflix hasn't ordered a fourth season yet, and that, if they do, the show probably won't go much further beyond it. The production has assumed it would go for somewhere between three and five seasons. "Given the intelligence of Marty Byrde and Wendy Byrde, if they keep going at this pitch for much longer, they're either going to be killed or put in jail," Bateman told Collider. "The alternative is to flatten out that pitch so that you don't end up jumping the shark, but then you start stalling just for additional episodes and seasons. So I'm not sure where and when it'll end, but given their intelligence, it doesn't feel like it's a 12-season show."

This Course Will Teach You How to Play Guitar Like a Pro for $29

BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images
BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

Be honest: You’ve watched a YouTube video or two in an attempt to learn how to play a song on the guitar. Whether it was through tabs or simply copying whatever you saw on the screen, the fun always ends when friends start throwing out requests for songs you have no idea how to play. So how about you actually learn how to play guitar for real this time?

It’s now possible to learn guitar from home with the Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle, which is currently on sale for $29. Grab that Gibson, Fender, or whatever you have handy, and learn to strum rhythms from scratch.

The strumming course will teach you how to count beats and rests to turn your hands and fingers into the perfect accompaniment for your own voice or other musicians. Then, you can take things a step further and learn advanced jamming and soloing to riff anytime, anywhere. This course will teach you to improvise across various chords and progressions so you can jump into any jam with something original. You’ll also have the chance to dive deep into the major guitar genres of bluegrass, blues, and jazz. Lessons in jam etiquette, genre history, and how to read music will separate you from a novice player.

This bundle also includes courses in ear training so you can properly identify any relative note, interval, or pitch. That way, you can play along with any song when it comes on, or even understand how to modify it into the key you’d prefer. And when the time comes to perform, be prepared with skilled hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, bends, trills, vibrato, and fret-tapping. Not only will you learn the basic foundations of guitar, you’ll ultimately be able to develop your own style with the help of these lessons.

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Which Friends Character Would Earn the Most Money in the Real World?

Warner Bros. Television/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Warner Bros. Television/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Although Friends went off the air in 2004, the iconic sitcom continues to attract new fans who've discovered the show via re-runs and streaming networks like HBO Max.

To play into this devoted fan base, the professional resume writers at StandOut-CV conducted a fun experiment: They asked more than 3000 fans to predict where Joey, Ross, Rachel, Chandler, Phoebe, and Monica would be today, career-wise. They also took the time to figure out how much each character would earn in their respective fields in the real world. Could we be more curious?

Bringing in the highest salary is Joey, whose acting exploits are projected to earn him approximately $61,022 a year. Next comes Dr. Ross, whose career as a paleontologist brings in an estimated $59,023. After that comes fashion designer Rachel, earning $54,563 a year, followed by Chandler's writer/editor salary of $47,039 annually. Phoebe comes next, with her musical career bringing in an annual salary of $43,604 (although the site doesn't mention how her massage therapy business might factor into her life today). Surprisingly, Monica would bring in the least amount of money; she'd earn an average of $43,165 per year as a head chef.

As far as where fans think the Friends gang would be today, the answers are pretty great: They believe Joey would have expanded his acting career to include his own reality series called Keeping Up With Joey Tribbiani. Monica, meanwhile, would have taken the next step in her culinary career by opening up her own restaurant, and her husband Chandler would have continued his passion for writing at a comics magazine. The last season of Friends follows Rachel as she works as an executive for Ralph Lauren, and fans theorize that she would have used her breadth of experience to start her own fashion brand. It's believed Phoebe would have continued her music career, perhaps even becoming a music teacher, while Ross would have spent time writing dinosaur-themed children's books.

Hopefully, the upcoming Friends reunion special will give fans a final answer on what the characters would be up to today.