This Fire Hydrant Provides Free Drinking Water to Dogs and People

iStock
iStock

Under ideal circumstances, fire hydrants are rarely used. But an industrial design graduate from ÉCAL in Switzerland has designed a hydrant that serves as a water fountain when it's not putting out blazes, Fast Company reports.

Dimitri Nassisi's Drinking Hydrant doubles as a source of drinkable water for both people and their dogs. The pipes release water at two different pressures: fire-fighting strength and a gentler stream for drinking. Pushing the black switch on top of the blue fountain in one direction shoots out water that pedestrians can drink right there, and pushing it the other way activates a different faucet meant for filling water bottles.

There's also a water dish built in to the bottom of the structure: Overflow from the spout fills the bowl so pets can drink from it. And should the hydrant ever need to be used for its original purpose, a nozzle on the side makes it easy for firefighters to access.

Nassisi came up with the redesigned fire hydrant after taking his dog for a walk one day. He noticed that while there weren't many public places to refill a water bottle, fire hydrants were everywhere. He designed the Drinking Hydrant for his thesis project at the Swiss design school École cantonale d'art de Lausanne.

Across the globe, people are buying roughly a million plastic bottles per minute, and throwing 91 percent of them in the garbage (or on the ground). Reusable bottles are one proposed solution to this problem, but numbers for their usage also look grim: According to a UK survey, only 36 percent of people regularly carry a reusable water bottle with them, while the majority of respondents said they wish free tap water was more accessible.

[h/t Fast Company]

These Rugged Steel-Toe Boots Look and Feel Like Summer Sneakers

Indestructible Shoes
Indestructible Shoes

Thanks to new, high-tech materials, our favorite shoes are lighter and more comfortable than ever. Unfortunately, one thing most sneakers are not is durable. They can’t protect your feet from the rain, let alone heavy objects. Luckily, as their name implies, Indestructible Shoes has come up with a line of steel-toe boots that look and feel like regular sneakers.

Made to be incredibly strong but still lightweight, every pair of Indestructible Shoes has steel toes, skid-proof grips, and shock-absorption technology. But they don't look clunky or bulky, which makes them suitable whether you're going to work, the gym, or a family gathering.

The Hummer is Indestructible Shoes’s most well-rounded model. It features European steel toes to protect your feet, while the durable "flymesh" material wicks moisture to keep your feet feeling fresh. The insole features 3D arch support and extra padding in the heel cup. And the outsole features additional padding that distributes weight and helps your body withstand strain.

Indestructible Shoes Hummer.
The Hummer from Indestructible Shoes.
Indestructible Shoes

There’s also the Xciter, Indestructible Shoes’s latest design. The company prioritized comfort for this model, with the same steel toes as the Hummer, but with additional extra-large, no-slip outsoles capable of gripping even smooth, slippery surfaces—like, say, a boat deck. The upper is made of breathable moisture-wicking flymesh to help keep your feet dry in the rain or if you're wearing them on the water.

If you want a more breathable shoe for the peak summer months, there's the Ryder. This shoe is designed to be a stylish solution to the problem of sweaty feet, thanks to a breathable mesh that maximizes airflow and minimizes sweat and odor. Meanwhile, extra padding in the midsole will keep your feet protected.

You can get 44 percent off all styles if you order today.

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Key West Has Installed Permanent Rainbow Crosswalks

In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
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In 2015, Key West became the first place in Florida to install permanent rainbow crosswalks—a celebration of LGBTQ+ pride that reflected the city’s “One Human Family” motto. But a few years later, the city decided to repave its historic Duval Street, which required tearing up the four colorful paths at the intersection of Petronia Street.

The rainbow crosswalks finally returned this week—just in time for Pride Month—and they’re even more vibrant than before. The old ones were essentially regular white crosswalks with each empty space filled in with a different color, whereas the new paths feature long, colored stripes with a white stripe along the top and bottom edges.

According to NBC 6 South Florida, workers positioned the thermoplastic stripes on the street and attached them to the pavement below with heat from propane torches. Key West mayor Teri Johnson and other officials then commemorated the new landmarks, located in the heart of the city's entertainment district, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. (The ribbon was also rainbow colored, and all participants wore masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus.)

“The rainbow crosswalks mean that everybody is welcome, everybody is equal, everybody is recognized, and that we do really abide by the ‘One Human Family’ spirit,” Johnson said.

Key West isn’t the only place with permanent rainbow paths; as LGBTQ Nation reports, you can find them in San Francisco, West Hollywood, Seattle, Philadelphia, Toronto, and other cities, too. And while the small island city has postponed its Pride events until November due to the pandemic, some of the world's biggest Pride parades and festivals are simply moving the party online: Here are 10 events to check out this month.

[h/t NBC 6 South Florida]