The Body of Australia's Somerton Man—a 70-Year-Old Cold Case—Might Be Exhumed

The grave of the Somerton Man in Adelaide, South Australia
The grave of the Somerton Man in Adelaide, South Australia
Michael Coghlan, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

In the 70 years it has been open, the Somerton Man case has produced more questions than answers. Police still don't know exactly what led to the death of an unidentified man on an Australian beach in late 1948, who killed him, or what the murderer's motives were. But a new development in the mystery could finally reveal the story's most glaring missing puzzle piece: the victim's identity. As The Australian reports, South Australia's new attorney general Vickie Chapman is considering exhuming the corpse of the Somerton Man so that investigators can extract and test his DNA.

The case dates back to December 1, 1948, when a swimmer stumbled upon a lifeless body propped up against a seawall on the beach. After the victim arrived at a local hospital, it soon became apparent that identifying him wouldn't be as easy as thumbing through his wallet. He had no ID, and all the labels on his clothing had been removed. The most striking thing about the man was his outfit: a suit, suggesting that he was a well-off businessman, and polished dress shoes. It was unusual attire for the beach.

The autopsy didn't make matters any clearer. Doctors concluded that the man had likely died of heart failure, but significant internal bleeding suggested that it was poison, not natural causes, that led to that failure. If it was poison that killed him, it would have been a fast-acting and fast-disappearing substance, since no traces of it were found.

The Somerton Man cipher
The Somerton Man cipher

There was one more clue: After a more thorough re-examination of the body by a pathology expert, investigators found a previously unnoticed pocket in the waist of the man's pants. It contained a piece of paper with the words Tamám Shud—Persian for "It is ended." They were able to trace the page back to the book from which it had been torn, a copy of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (a Persian book of poetry), which had an inscrutable series of letters scribbled on the back cover. Military experts were unable to crack the code—assuming the letters even were a code—and it remains undeciphered to this day.

Someone had also written a phone number on the back of the book. That number led them to a nurse named Jo Thomson. With no friends or family members coming forward to claim the body, Thomson was the first and only lead in the case. She claimed she had never met the victim nor had she given him the book, but when she was shown a plaster cast of his face, she reportedly came close to fainting.

The case was ignored for years, but in 2007 Derek Abbott, a professor at the University of Adelaide, decided to give it a second look. Thanks largely to his efforts, authorities may be closer than they've ever been to identifying the Somerton Man.

According to Abbott's theory, Jo Thomson had an illegitimate child with the Somerton Man before he died, which would explain why she was hesitant to admit that she knew him. When Abbott found an old photograph of Thomson's son Robin, he noticed that the boy shared some distinguishing features with the Somerton Man: Both had canines positioned right next to their front teeth, and the upper hollows in their ears were larger than the lower hollows. Both of these features are hereditary and only appear in 1 percent or less of the population.

Adding another intriguing layer to the story: Abbott married Rachel Egan, Jo Thomson's biological granddaughter, after getting to know her during his investigation. If his hunches are correct, the three children he now has with Egan are the great-grandchildren of the Somerton Man.

Abbott plans to test his theory by analyzing DNA from the Somerton Man's exhumed corpse and comparing it to Egan's. If Egan isn't a match, Abbott hopes the DNA could eventually lead him to someone alive today who is. But if the two are a match, it would provide some closure to a murder mystery that has baffled Australia for decades.

Interest in the case has been heightened by a new documentary called Missing Pieces: The Curious Case of the Somerton Man, which screened recently in Adelaide. Chapman has said the state government would consider requests to exhume the body as long as the costs were privately met. While no time frame for the body's disinterment has been set, Abbott told The Advertiser that if money is an issue, crowdsourcing the project is always a possibility.

[h/t The Australian]

The ChopBox Smart Cutting Board Has a Food Scale, Timer, and Knife Sharper Built Right Into It

ChopBox
ChopBox

When it comes to furnishing your kitchen with all of the appliances necessary to cook night in and night out, you’ll probably find yourself running out of counter space in a hurry. The ChopBox, which is available on Indiegogo and dubs itself “The World’s First Smart Cutting Board,” looks to fix that by cramming a bunch of kitchen necessities right into one cutting board.

In addition to giving you a knife-resistant bamboo surface to slice and dice on, the ChopBox features a built-in digital scale that weighs up to 6.6 pounds of food, a nine-hour kitchen timer, and two knife sharpeners. It also sports a groove on its surface to catch any liquid runoff that may be produced by the food and has a second pull-out cutting board that doubles as a serving tray.

There’s a 254nm UVC light featured on the board, which the company says “is guaranteed to kill 99.99% of germs and bacteria" after a minute of exposure. If you’re more of a traditionalist when it comes to cleanliness, the ChopBox is completely waterproof (but not dishwasher-safe) so you can wash and scrub to your heart’s content without worry. 

According to the company, a single one-hour charge will give you 30 days of battery life, and can be recharged through a Micro USB port.

The ChopBox reached its $10,000 crowdfunding goal just 10 minutes after launching its campaign, but you can still contribute at different tiers. Once it’s officially released, the ChopBox will retail for $200, but you can get one for $100 if you pledge now. You can purchase the ChopBox on Indiegogo here.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

Researchers Discover New Details In Vermeer’s Girl With a Pearl Earring

Johannes Vermeer's Girl With a Pearl Earring, circa 1665.
Johannes Vermeer's Girl With a Pearl Earring, circa 1665.
Art Media/Print Collector/Getty Images

In 2018, the Mauritshuis gallery in The Hague, Netherlands, gathered an international team of researchers to take part in its “Girl in the Spotlight” project, which aimed to unlock the secrets of Johannes Vermeer’s famed Girl With a Pearl Earring, circa 1665.

Their recently published findings reveal many intriguing details about Vermeer’s artistic process and the artwork itself, though the identity of the painting’s enigmatic subject remains a mystery. Using X-rays and other advanced imaging techniques, the researchers discovered Vermeer depicted the girl in front of a faint green curtain—not an empty dark background—and even painted eyelashes on her eyes.

As The Guardian reports, scholars in the past have cited both the lack of eyelashes and the blank background as support for the theory that Vermeer was painting a conceptual, idealized image of a girl, so these newfound features could be evidence that an actual person posed for him in a specific setting. And, according to head researcher Abbie Vandivere, it’s not entirely a bad thing that we still don’t know who that person is.

“It is good that some mysteries remain and everyone can speculate about her. It allows people their own personal interpretation of the girl; everyone feels their own connection with the way she meets your eyes,” she told The Guardian. “The fact that she is still a mystery keeps people coming back and keeps her exciting and fresh.”

While we’re all pondering the puzzling origin of one of the most captivating models in art history, there are plenty of other fascinating revelations from the Mauritshuis investigation to talk about, too. For one, the Dutch artist evidently spared no expense in bringing Girl With a Pearl Earring to life: the raw materials he used to create various colors in the painting came from just about everywhere, including England, Mexico, Central America, and maybe even Asia or the West Indies. Ultramarine, a blue pigment derived from lapis lazuli (an export of what’s now Afghanistan), which Vermeer used for the girl’s headscarf and jacket, was more valuable than gold at the time.

The study also shed light on Vermeer’s painting methods. He began with broad brush strokes of brown and black paint, layering the girl on top of the background, and then made slight adjustments to her ear, the back of her neck, and the top of her scarf.

If “Girl in the Spotlight” has proven anything, it’s that there’s always more to discover about a work of art—and that’s just what the Mauritshuis intends to do.

“Please know that this is not the end point of our research, but an intermediate station,” Mauritshuis director Martine Gosselink said in a press release. “The collaborations are growing, and so is the desire to find out more.”

As you wait for more information to come to light, here are 15 fascinating facts about Girl With a Pearl Earring.

[h/t The Guardian]