Drones Rearrange This Canopy Prototype So You're Always in the Shade

iStock
iStock

When they're not rebuilding the environment or exploring Mars, the drones of the future may help us avoid some of life's minor inconveniences. A group of masters students at the University of Stuttgart envisioned a fleet of drones that does just that for their thesis project: As New Atlas reports, the drones are part of a roaming canopy, responding to sunlight above and movement below to ensure you're always in the shade.

Without the drones, the prototype, dubbed Cyber Physical Macro Material, resembles a normal stationary structure. Tall black poles support panels that fit together magnetically, protecting whoever's beneath them from the sun's rays. But this design is only effective when the sun is in a certain part of the sky: As the day progresses, the canopy's shadow shifts, and people are forced to move with it if they want to stay out of the light.

But these panels don't stay in the same spot for long. They come equipped with special sensors that keep track of the orientation of the sun and a communications system that corresponds with autonomous drones nearby. If a panel is no longer keeping the ground beneath it shady, a drone will glide over, lift it up, and snap it into a different part of the canopy like a puzzle piece. Drones can also rearrange the panels in response to the size and location of the crowd beneath them, which means the same structure that shades a few pedestrians can also keep a larger party cool.

There are legal and logistical hurdles the project would need to overcome before becoming a system in a real-world, but the researchers behind it say that for now it's meant to get people thinking about the potential applications for drones. A press release from the university reads, "With its ability to continuously reconstruct during use, the system challenges pre-conceived ideas of robotic digital fabrication and sophisticated pre-fabrication for architecture."

You can see how the drone-powered canopy works in the video below.

Cyber Physical Macro Material as a UAV [re]Configurable Architectural System from ICD on Vimeo.

[h/t New Atlas]

Wayfair’s Fourth of July Clearance Sale Takes Up to 60 Percent Off Grills and Outdoor Furniture

Wayfair/Weber
Wayfair/Weber

This Fourth of July, Wayfair is making sure you can turn your backyard into an oasis while keeping your bank account intact with a clearance sale that features savings of up to 60 percent on essentials like chairs, hammocks, games, and grills. Take a look at some of the highlights below.

Outdoor Furniture

Brisbane bench from Wayfair
Brisbane/Wayfair

- Jericho 9-Foot Market Umbrella $92 (Save 15 percent)
- Woodstock Patio Chairs (Set of Two) $310 (Save 54 percent)
- Brisbane Wooden Storage Bench $243 (Save 62 percent)
- Kordell Nine-Piece Rattan Sectional Seating Group with Cushions $1800 (Save 27 percent)
- Nelsonville 12-Piece Multiple Chairs Seating Group $1860 (Save 56 percent)
- Collingswood Three-Piece Seating Group with Cushions $410 (Save 33 percent)

Grills and Accessories

Dyna-Glo electric smoker.
Dyna-Glo/Wayfair

- Spirit® II E-310 Gas Grill $479 (Save 17 percent)
- Portable Three-Burner Propane Gas Grill $104 (Save 20 percent)
- Digital Bluetooth Electric Smoker $224 (Save 25 percent)
- Cuisinart Grilling Tool Set $38 (Save 5 percent)

Outdoor games

American flag cornhole game.
GoSports

- American Flag Cornhole Board $57 (Save 19 percent)
- Giant Four in a Row Game $30 (Save 6 percent)
- Giant Jenga Game $119 (Save 30 percent)

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No Squawking, Please: A Backyard Bird Library Is the Star of This Livestream

Bird Library, YouTube
Bird Library, YouTube

Many people discovered backyard birding when they were quarantined in their homes at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Even if you have a vibrant wildlife population in your area, the Bird Library webcam is worth checking out. As Atlas Obscura reports, the bird feeder at the focus of the livestream resembles a tiny library where feathered guests can misbehave.

Librarian Rebecca Flowers and woodworker Kevin Cwalina were inspired to build the Bird Library in 2015. Located in a backyard in Charlottesville, Virginia, it features a miniature reading chair, bookshelves, and a reception desk. The decorations are even updated to match the seasons; the feeder currently sports a banner that says "Summer Reading." The main differences setting it apart from a real library are the bird seed scattered on the floor and the avian visitors.

The Bird Library attracts a diverse collection of patrons. Sparrows, cardinals, and mourning doves have been recorded perching on the librarian's desk and checking out the reading materials. The occasional squirrel has also been known to stop by.

Live video of the feeder streams on the Bird Library's YouTube page and website 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can play the video below to check in on the current guests. If the backyard Bird Library has inspired you to find birds closer to home, here's some gear for beginner naturalists.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]