5 Actors Who Could Play Captain America Next

iStock/BrendanHunter
iStock/BrendanHunter

It seems to be all but official that the Marvel Cinematic Universe is losing one of its first and
brightest stars. After he finished filming for the secretive and as-yet-untitled Avengers 4, Chris Evans—who has been playing Captain America a.k.a. Steve Rogers in the franchise since 2011—stated in a cryptic tweet that he will be stepping away from the role.

Given the nature of his character and the bizarre multimedia franchise he's now involved it, it is likely that Steve Rogers willdie in the upcoming film, leaving the role of Captain America up for grabs. Fans are already scrambling to figure out which of the many comic characters to take up the mantle is set for the MCU treatment and, more importantly, who would be playing them. Here are our top five picks.

1. SEBASTIAN STAN

 Sebastian Stan attends the Gersh Upfronts Party 2018 at The Bowery Hotel on May 15, 2018 in New York City
Jared Siskin, Getty Images for Gersh

This one seems the most likely as not only would it be keeping more accurately to the comics, but ​Bucky Barnes making the transition to become Captain America would be the logical summation of his character growth. The MCU has basically been setting up his ascension to the role since the scene in Captain America: The First Avenger when he first picked up the iconic shield.

2. ANTHONY MACKIE

The Falcon and Captain America shared a series and a billing for years as equal partners, making it one of the most racially progressive moves and relationships in comics at the time. Later in comic lore, Falcon inherited Cap's shield when the latter's super soldier serum wore off and he aged exponentially. As Sam Wilson, Mackie would be well within his rights to hold the star shield.

3. KEKE PALMER

 Actress KeKe Palmer attends Columbia Pictures 'Superfly' Atlanta special screening on June 7, 2018 at SCADShow in Atlanta, Georgia
Paras Griffin, Getty Images for Sony Pictures Entertainment

In the future of the Marvel universe of the comics, the role of Captain America is taken up by Danielle Cage, the daughter of Jessica Jones and Luke Cage. Both Luke and Jessica already exist in the MCU, played by Mike Colter and Krysten Ritter, but they have yet to have their baby.

However, if Avengers 4 uses a time travel McGuffin as many suspect it will, there's a chance we could see what their adult child would look like in the star-spangled suit. If we do, ​Keke Palmer looks like almost a perfect fusion of the two Netflix actors and could certainly pull off the red, white, and blue.

4. DENZEL WASHINGTON

In the comics, before the final version of the super soldier serum was used to transform Steve Rogers into Captain America, prototype versions were used on African Americans with varying degrees of willingness in a blatant nod to the tragic Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Of those tested on, only Isaiah Bradley survived.

While not frozen in ice, Bradley's serum slowed his aging to the point where he is still alive and empowered in the current comic continuity. It wouldn't be too much of a leap in logic for the MCU to retroactively declare that there was a second, African American Cap ready to take over
if Rogers ever died. If they do, Denzel Washington would be an ideal choice to play him as Marvel has discussed roles with him before.

5. RYAN PHILLIPPE

Actor Ryan Phillippe attends the NBCUniversal 2016 Upfront Presentation on May 16, 2016 in New York, New York
Slaven Vlasic, Getty Images

One of the people to take the moniker of Captain America was John Walker, a wannabe American war hero who operated under the name U.S. Agent. After Steve Rogers went rogue during the events of Civil War, Walker was approached with an offer to be the new Captain America. While he served very briefly in the role, he proved to be a much more violent and brutal version of the character.

A veteran of military shooter films and television shows, Ryan Phillippe might be a good choice to play a more militaristic, bloodthirsty Cap.

Why Air Supply Changed the Lyrics to “All Out of Love” for American Fans

Air Supply.
Air Supply.
Peter Carrette Archive/Getty Images

Sometimes one minor detail can make all the difference. A case study for this principle comes in the form of the pop music act Air Supply, which enjoyed success in the 1980s thanks to mellow hits like “Lost in Love,” “Every Woman in the World,” and "Making Love Out of Nothing at All." Their 1980 single “All Out of Love” is among that laundry list, though it needed one major tweak before becoming palatable for American audiences.

The Air Supply duo of Graham Russell and Russell Hitchcock hailed from Australia, and it was one particular bit of phrasing in “All Out of Love” that may have proven difficult for Americans to grasp. According to an interview with Russell on Songfacts, the lyrics to the song when it became a hit in their home country in 1978 were:

I’m all out of love

I want to arrest you

By “arrest,” Russell explained, he meant capturing someone’s attention. Naturally, most listeners would have found this puzzling. Before the song was released in the United States, Air Supply’s producer, Clive Davis, suggested it be changed to:

I’m all out of love

I’m so lost without you

I know you were right

Davis’s argument was that the “arrest” line was “too weird” and would sink the song’s chances. He also recommended adding “I know you were right.”

Davis proved to be correct when “All Out of Love” reached the number two spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in February 1980.

While it would be reasonable to assume “I want to arrest you” is a common phrase of affection in Australia, it isn’t. “I think that was just me using a weird word,” Russell said. “But, you know, now [that] I think of it, it’s definitely very weird.”

Russell added that arrest joins a list of words that are probably best left out of a love song, and that cabbage and cauliflower would be two others.

[h/t Songfacts]

In 1995, You Could Smell Like Kermit the Frog

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

The mid-'90s were a great time for Kermit the Frog. In 1996 alone, he led the Tournament of Roses Parade, was the face of the 40-year-old Muppet brand, and had both a movie (Muppet Treasure Island) and a television show (Muppets Live!) to promote. His career could not have been hotter, so Kermit did what any multifaceted, single-person empire does while sitting atop his or her celebrity throne: he released a fragrance. Amphibia, produced by Jim Henson Productions, was dripping with froggy sex appeal. The unisex perfume—its slogan was "pour homme, femme, et frog"—had a clean, citrusy smell with a hint of moss to conjure up memories of the swamp. Offered exclusively at Bloomingdale's in Manhattan, it sold for $18.50 (or $32.50 for those who wanted a gift box and T-shirt).

There’s no trace of a commercial for the perfume—which is a shame, since Amphibia is a word that begs to be whispered—but a print ad and photos of the packaging still live online. The six-pack and strategically-placed towel are an apt parody ... and also deeply unsettling.

Amphibia was the most-sold fragrance at the Manhattan Bloomingdale's in the 1995 Christmas season. "Kids are buying it, grown-ups are buying it, and frogs are really hot," pitchman Max Almenas told The New York Times.

It was a hit past the Christmas season, too: The eau de Muppet was cheekily reviewed by Mary Roach—who would go on to write Stiff and Packing for Mars—in a 1996 issue of TV Guide. "I wore Amphibia on my third date ... he said he found me riveting which I heard as ribbitting, as in 'ribbit, ribbit,' and I got all defensive," she wrote. "He assured me I didn't smell like a swamp ... I stuck my tongue out at him, to which he responded that it was the wrong time of year for flies, and besides, the food would be arriving shortly."

Not to be outdone, Miss Piggy also released a fragrance a few years later. It was, naturally, called Moi.

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