Florida's Dog Racing Ban Means Thousands of Greyhounds Will Be Put Up for Adoption

iStock.com/Zbynek Pospisil
iStock.com/Zbynek Pospisil

Amendment 13, which bans dog racing in Florida, may seem like a win for animal rights, but now greyhounds in the state are facing a new set of challenges. As NBC reports, thousands of former racing dogs will be left without homes between now and when the ban goes into effect in 2020.

The new law, which Floridians voted in favor of on Tuesday, November 6, will lead to the closure of 11 of the 17 remaining active dog tracks in the U.S. Despite dog racing's connections to animal cruelty, not all animal rights groups were supportive of the legislation. Greyhounds as Pets, a Jacksonville-based nonprofit that specifically works to place retired racing dogs with families, outright opposed it. Because the amendment made no mention of planning or funding the adoptions of the greyhounds that will be abandoned, the organization argued that the ban will do more harm than good.

Other groups are more optimistic. The Florida Humane Society has reportedly received a flood of phone calls from prospective greyhound adopters since Election Night. Whether or not they supported the ban, shelters and animal adoption groups throughout the state are organizing to accommodate the thousands of greyhounds that will be entering the system in the near future.

If you're able to bring a new pet into your home and are within easy traveling distance of Florida, a retired racing dog is a great option. Friends of Greyhounds, Elite Greyhound Adoptions South Florida, and Greyhound Pets of America/Greater Orlando are just a few of the adoption groups you can contact.

[h/t NBC]

The New Apple Watch SE Is Now Available on Amazon

Apple/Amazon
Apple/Amazon

Apple products are notorious for their high price tags. From AirPods to iPads to MacBooks, it can be difficult to find the perfect piece of tech on sale when you are ready to buy. Luckily, for those who have had their eye on a new Apple Watch, the Apple Watch SE is designed with all the features users want but at a lower starting price of $279— and they're available on Amazon right now.

The SE exists as a more affordable option when compared to Apple's new Series 6 line of watches. This less expensive version has many of the same functions of its pricier brethren, except for certain features like the blood oxygen sensor and electrical heart sensor. To make up for the truncated bells and whistles, the SE comes in at least $120 cheaper than the Series 6, which starts at $400 and goes up to $800. The SE comes with technical improvements on previous models as well, such as the fall detection, a faster processor, a larger screen, water resistance, and more.

Now available in 40mm ($279) and 44mm ($309), both SE models offer a variety of colors to choose from, such as sliver, space gray, and pink. If you want cellular connection, you’ll have to pay a bit more for the 40mm ($329) and the 44mm ($359).

For more, head to Amazon to see the full list of offerings from Apple.

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The Queen’s Guard May Have to Give Up Their Iconic Bearskin Hats

Can you tell that this is real bear fur?
Can you tell that this is real bear fur?
Defence Images, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The UK’s departure from the European Union (EU) has given its leaders the chance to negotiate new trade deals and maybe even ban the sale of certain products—like fur. It’s something animal rights activists have long been pushing for, and a recently publicized letter from UK environment secretary George Eustice suggests that the government will indeed investigate the possibility.

As The Independent reports, Eustice wrote to the chief executive of the British Fur Trade Association that “once the UK’s future trading relationship with the EU has been established, there will be an opportunity to consider further steps it could take in relation to fur sales.” It’s far from a definitive proclamation, but since Eustice has seemed open to banning fur in the past, the letter has been taken as a positive sign for the anti-fur movement.

If the UK does eventually prohibit the sale of fur, this could mean the end of the authentic bearskin hats worn by the Queen’s Guard, who are most often seen stationed outside Buckingham Palace. According to Londonist, the 18-inch hats are created with fur from black bears killed during Canada’s annual black bear cull—a large-scale hunt that helps keep the population under control—and the UK Ministry of Defence purchases up to 100 new hats for the famously unflappable infantrymen each year.

The tradition of donning such eccentric headgear dates back to the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, when Napoleon’s Imperial Guard wore similar hats to make them seem taller and more intimidating. After the French were defeated by the Duke of Wellington and his British army, Britain adopted the hats as a symbol of victory.

But even if the UK does prohibit fur in the future, the Queen’s Guard could still keep the custom going. After all, there are plenty of convincing kinds of fake fur on the market these days. And as for what Queen Elizabeth II might think about the shift, we’re guessing she’d condone it; she herself gave up wearing fur products in 2019.

[h/t The Independent]