The Reason Dogs Dig (and How to Make Them to Stop)

iStock/boschettophotography
iStock/boschettophotography

Digging is a totally normal canine behavior, but that doesn't make it any less annoying. If your dog is spending hours tearing up the backyard, or attempting to burrow holes into your couch, you're no doubt anxious to find a way to make it stop. The most effective way to get to the bottom of the problem, and curb your pup's desire to destroy everything in the path of their overactive paws, is to first understand why they are digging, according to The Dog People.

If your dog is digging random holes throughout your yard, it is most likely because they smell or hear something underground and are trying to get to it. In this case, digging a larger hole where it is acceptable for them to dig can keep them from digging all over the yard. Train them to dig only there by burying treats in that hole for them to find.

Another cause of unwanted digging is boredom and a lack of exercise. Puppies and high-energy dogs need a certain amount of exercise to work off all the energy they have. If they aren’t getting enough, they might turn to digging to take care of that. Make sure your dog gets plenty of playtime and take them on walks when you can.

Like a toddler, dogs can easily be distracted by a toy. If your dog seems to be digging out of boredom, try giving them a new tennis ball or dental chew.

Dogs that have very specific spots in which they dig can be stopped by adding digging deterrents to soil, especially those that are strong-smelling or uncomfortable-feeling. Burying flat rocks or plastic chicken wire will make it uncomfortable for a dog to dig, for example, and burying citrus peels, cayenne, or vinegar will make the smell while digging very unpleasant to them.

A dog could also be trailing the smell of a gopher, squirrel, rat, or other rodent while digging up your backyard. One sign of this is if they are digging near trees or plants. If this is the case, try getting rid of the rodents and see if your dog’s behavior changes.

Some dogs will dig in order to find a spot to cool down during hot weather. By helping your dog cool off, you can prevent the bad habit.

This Innovative Cutting Board Takes the Mess Out of Meal Prep

There's no way any of these ingredients will end up on the floor.
There's no way any of these ingredients will end up on the floor.
TidyBoard, Kickstarter

Transferring food from the cutting board to the bowl—or scraps to the compost bin—can get a little messy, especially if you’re dealing with something that has a tendency to roll off the board, spill juice everywhere, or both (looking at you, cherry tomatoes).

The TidyBoard, available on Kickstarter, is a cutting board with attached containers that you can sweep your ingredients right into, taking the mess out of meal prep and saving you some counter space in the process. The board itself is 15 inches by 20 inches, and the container that fits in its empty slot is 14 inches long, 5.75 inches wide, and more than 4 inches deep. Two smaller containers fit inside the large one, making it easy to separate your ingredients.

Though the 4-pound board hangs off the edge of your counter, good old-fashioned physics will keep it from tipping off—as long as whatever you’re piling into the containers doesn’t exceed 9 pounds. It also comes with a second set of containers that work as strainers, so you can position the TidyBoard over the edge of your sink and drain excess water or juice from your ingredients as you go.

You can store food in the smaller containers, which have matching lids; and since they’re all made of BPA-free silicone, feel free to pop them in the microwave. (Remove the small stopper on top of the lid first for a built-in steaming hole.)

tidyboard storage containers
They also come in gray, if teal isn't your thing.
TidyBoard

Not only does the bamboo-made TidyBoard repel bacteria, it also won’t dull your knives or let strong odors seep into it. In short, it’s an opportunity to make cutting, cleaning, storing, and eating all easier, neater, and more efficient. Prices start at $79, and it’s expected to ship by October 2020—you can find out more details and order yours on Kickstarter.

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The Reason Princess Anne Doesn’t Shake Hands With the Public

Princess Anne's aversion to handshakes isn't personal—it's logical.
Princess Anne's aversion to handshakes isn't personal—it's logical.
Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

While many people have temporarily abandoned handshakes to prevent the spread of COVID-19, there’s at least one person who hasn’t really had to break the habit: Queen Elizabeth II’s daughter, Princess Anne.

As Reader’s Digest reports, royal family members have long been discouraged from shaking hands with the public simply because it wouldn’t be realistic to bestow a handshake upon every person clamoring for one in a crowd. But the Queen herself began to break with that tradition in the 1970s, and some of her relatives have followed suit—not Princess Anne, though.

“We never shook hands. The theory was that you couldn’t shake hands with everybody, so don’t start. So I kind of stick with that, but I noticed others don’t,” Princess Anne explained in the HBO documentary Queen of the World. “It's not for me to say that it's wrong, but I think the initial concept was that it was patently absurd to start shaking hands. And it seems to be that it's become a ‘shaking hands’ exercise rather than a walkabout, if you see what I mean.”

Even if you happen to meet the Queen or another British royal who’s been known to indulge in a ‘shaking hands’ exercise in the past, it’s still considered bad manners for you to initiate it.

“If you are a member of the public meeting a member of the royal family, you should never offer your hand to shake,” Grant Harrold, etiquette expert and former royal butler, told Insider. “Wait for them to initiate the handshake.”

Your chances are better if said royal happens to be wearing gloves, which they often don before public engagements where they plan to shake a lot of hands. The practice, perhaps unsurprisingly, helps shield them from germs.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]