Book Your Flight: Canada’s International Hair Freezing Competition Is Here

If you're looking to instantly transform your hairstyle, head to Takhini Hot Pools in Canada's Yukon Territory. The natural hot springs there make it possible to bathe outdoors in extreme freezing weather, resulting in some impressive 'dos when people get their hair wet and let it harden. As Smithsonian reports, the practice has become so popular that there's now an annual event to see who can freeze their hair into the most impressive shapes. Photos of 2020's contestants have already started pouring into HairFreezingContest.com, and the competition looks fierce.

The first International Hair Freezing Contest took place in February 2011 as a spin-off of the local Yukon Sourdough Rendezvous. After competing in winter sporting events all day, athletes from the rendezvous would head to Takhini to take a mineral bath in one of the pools fed by the area's natural hot spring. The manager at the time turned the relaxation session into another competition when he asked bathers to sculpt their wet hair into frozen works of art. Whoever ended up with the best selfie won the contest.

What began as a fun activity among a small group of people has grown into a major competition. Each winter, people from around the world visit the hot pools hoping to take part. The Hair Freezing Contest is unique in that it doesn't take place over a set stretch of dates. Rather, guests compete whenever it's cold enough outside to achieve the desired hairstyling effects, e.g. when it's -4°F or colder. Throughout winter, competitors can sign a form proving they were really there, and if it's cold enough to shape their hair in the pools, they can snap a selfie and submit their work to Takhini. Categories include Best Male Photo, Best Female Photo, Most Creative Photo, and Best Group Photo. Contestants are eligible to win $2000, complimentary soaks, and free passes to Takhini's new facility when it opens in autumn.

For those worried about their hair falling out, the business promises that hair freezing isn't harmful, and dipping your head into the pool quickly thaws it back to normal.

Selfies will be accepted through March 8, 2020, with official voting on the winners taking place on March 15. To see some hairstyles in the running to win this year's contest, check out the photos below.

Dominate Game Night With Godzilla-Themed Monopoly and Jenga

Usaopoly
Usaopoly

Competitive board games have a tendency to bring out players' monstrous sides, and later this year, you'll be able to embrace those destructive impulses with Jenga and Monopoly games inspired by Godzilla.

Both products featuring Japan's iconic mutant menace are a collaboration between games publisher USAopoly (also known as The Op) and entertainment company Toho International, CBR.com reports. The first one, dubbed Monopoly: Godzilla, is billed as a "city-terrorizing twist on the classic board game." The properties available for conquering include Monster Island, Goro’s Workshop, and Kitakami Lake. Instead of the classic game pieces, players use tokens of monsters like Mothra, Rodan, and Godzilla to dominate the board.

The second game pairs so perfectly with Godzilla that it may rival the classic version. In Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition, the block tower resembles a skyscraper taken from downtown Tokyo, and it comes with a cardboard cutout of Godzilla unleashing a beam of atomic breath. With every role of the die, Godzilla moves along the "approach track," increasing the number of blocks removed each turn and hastening the building's destruction.

Godzilla Jenga.
Usaopoly

Monopoly: Godzilla will sell for $40, and Jenga: Godzilla Extreme Edition will cost $20. You can find them in select stores when they debut in the spring.

A ‘Valentine Phantom’ Has Been Covering Portland, Maine, in Paper Hearts for More Than 40 Years

Corey Templeton, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Corey Templeton, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Portland, Maine, has a secret admirer. Each Valentine's Day, flyers and banners with pink and red hearts appear in random spots around the city. According to Bangor Daily News, no one has claimed responsibility for the anonymous valentines in 41 years.

The first evidence of the so-called "Valentine Phantom" (who is sometimes referred to as the "Valentine Bandit") surfaced in Portland in 1976. Paper hearts were found plastering the streets on the holiday, with no clues indicating where they came from. The mystery only grew as the hearts returned every year on February 14. There's no pattern dictating where the hearts are placed; they've been found on everything from snowbanks to landmarks. Massive banners have also been hung up in prominent places. In the past decade, giant hearts have emblazoned the Portland Public Library and the ruins of Fort Gorges in Casco Bay.

In 2017, Bangor Daily News landed an exclusive interview with the Valentine Phantom. The mysterious force is actually a crew of Valentine's Day-lovers with connections to various sites and buildings around the city. The perpetrators declined to share their identities, telling the outlet, “Most people are dying to be in the paper. This is the opposite. This is not ego-driven.”

The Phantom has done more than spread good feelings to fellow Portlanders on Valentine's Day; they've sparked a nationwide trend. Similar anonymous heart flyers have appeared in Montpelier, Vermont, and Boulder, Colorado.

[h/t Bangor Daily News]

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