The 20 Most Pet-Friendly Cities in America

Ramin Talaie/Getty Images
Ramin Talaie/Getty Images

Pet parents have to look at more than just commute times and real estate prices when finding a new place to live. Factors like walkability, the number of parks, and the availability of pet sitters all dictate how comfortable a new city will be for dogs and their owners. If you're looking to make a move with your pooch, pet-sitting site Rover recently teamed up with real estate website Redfin to determine the best cities for dog lovers.

Together, the companies looked at a number of different metrics, like how easy it is to walk in each city, the concentration of dog walkers and sitters there, and the number of homes for sale with the word dog in the listing. And to measure the quality of a city's pet services, Rover broke down the total hours, minutes, and distance per walk given by the dog walkers in its system.

The report found there are dog-friendly cities across the country. Seattle ranked at the very top, followed by Chicago, Denver, and Manhattan. Cities throughout the South, including Austin, Houston, and Atlanta, also made the list, as did a handful of places in California (including Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego).

You can check out the full round-up of dog-friendly cities below. And when you're ready to make your move, here are some tips for finding a pet-friendly apartment.

  1. Seattle, Washington

  1. Chicago, Illinois

  1. Denver, Colorado

  1. Manhattan, New York

  1. Washington, D.C.

  1. Portland, Oregon

  1. Los Angeles, California

  1. Brooklyn, New York

  1. San Francisco, California

  1. San Diego, California

  1. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  1. Houston, Texas

  1. Austin, Texas

  1. Arlington, Virginia

  1. Minneapolis, Minnesota

  1. Alexandria, Virginia

  1. Dallas, Texas

  1. Atlanta, Georgia

  1. San Jose, California

  1. Nashville, Tennessee

This Outdoor Lantern Will Keep Mosquitoes Away—No Bug Spray Necessary

Thermacell, Amazon
Thermacell, Amazon

With summer comes outdoor activities, and with those activities come mosquito bites. If you're one of the unlucky people who seem to attract the insects, you may be tempted to lock yourself inside for the rest of the season. But you don't have to choose between comfort and having a cocktail on the porch, because this lamp from Thermacell ($25) keeps outdoor spaces mosquito-free without the mess of bug spray.

The device looks like an ordinary lantern you would display on a patio, but it works like bug repellent. When it's turned on, a fuel cartridge in the center provides the heat needed to activate a repellent mat on top of the lamp. Once activated, the repellent in the mat creates a 15-by-15-foot bubble of protection that repels any mosquitos nearby, making it a great option for camping trips, days by the pool, and backyard barbecues.

Mosquito repellent lantern.

Unlike some other mosquito repellents, this lantern is clean, safe, and scent-free. It also provides light like a real lamp, so you can keep pests away without ruining your backyard's ambience.

The Thermacell mosquito repellent lantern is now available on Amazon. If you've already suffered your first mosquito bites of the summer, here's some insight into why that itch can be so excruciating.

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Study: Women Are Less Attracted to Men Who Have Cats In Their Dating Profile Pics

Cats can ruin a relationship before it even gets started, according to science.
Cats can ruin a relationship before it even gets started, according to science.
Arx0nt/iStock via Getty Images

Numerous strategies and tips exist for putting your best foot forward in an online dating profile. You should be seen with friends, enjoying the outdoors, and maybe in a snapshot with your beloved pooch. But if you’re a man seeking a woman, it might be inadvisable to post a picture of you and your cat.

That’s the conclusion of researchers at Colorado State University and Boise State University, who published their findings in the journal Animals. In two surveys, more than 1300 heterosexual women aged 18 to 24 were shown photos of two men, aged 20 and 21, who posed for photos with and without a cat in their arms. In a questionnaire, the women assessed the men on perceived attributes like personality, masculinity, femininity, and “dateability.”

Cradling a cat had a negative impact across the board. In the first survey, when one of the men was feline-free, 38 percent of 708 respondents said they were likely or very likely to be receptive to a casual dating dynamic. A serious relationship was on the table for 37 percent. But with the cat in the picture, those warm feelings dropped to just 33 percent. Women who responded they would never be interested rose from 9 percent after viewing non-cat images to 14 percent when a furry friend appeared.

The man in the other survey fared no better, with 40 percent of 680 respondents uninterested in a date when he was alone compared to 45 percent when he was holding his pet. A serious relationship was a no-go for 41 percent of women, with the number rising to 45 percent when presented with the man and his cat.

Ultimately, the women found the photos of men with cats to signal the men were more neurotic, less masculine, and less desirable from a dating standpoint. But nearly half of respondents self-identified as dog lovers, which might indicate some pet biases are at work.

A photo of a man posing with cat, of course, does not exclude a love of dogs, nor does the absence of a pet indicate a preference for either cats or dogs. But the survey does seem to provide evidence that the very presence of a cat will lead to some unfavorable assumptions. If you've been unlucky in online love, it may not be you. It might be your fluffball.

[h/t CNN]