In 1929, infamous organized crime figure Alphonse “Al” Capone was incarcerated in Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary for possessing an unlicensed and concealed firearm. Capone was released in 1930—though he would famously go to federal prison on tax evasion charges only two years later. Eastern State Penitentiary closed in 1970, reopening in 1994 as a historic site that lets visitors explore prison life (though not prison food, thankfully).

While the prison has always made note of Capone’s cell, the facility has just launched an exhibit that recreates how Capone lived at the prison more accurately than ever before, according to the Associated Press.

Courtesy of Eastern State Penitentiary

Work began in January 2019 to restore and repaint the plaster walls of Capone's original cell. In the process, further research indicated that certain details of Capone’s stay—like the fact that he had a roommate—would need to be incorporated into the design. A cot was added and some items were removed after it was discovered that the cell was not as luxuriously furnished as some reports had indicated at the time. Rather than boasting of expensive furniture, his cell likely consisted of a prison-made rug, a dresser, a table, a flower vase, and a smoking stand.

The restoration work uncovered more than just Capone’s lack of privacy. While preparing the walls, workers uncovered a considerable amount of paint schemes covering the surface that indicated an attempt to paint artwork or change the color of the walls. Not wanting to cover the evidence of inmate artistry back up, Capone’s recreated cell was moved to the next cell over.

Visitors can view both at Eastern State, which is open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

[h/t PennLive]