11 Wonderful Former Disney Rides

daveland
daveland

Since Disneyland's opening in 1955, and Disney World's in 1971, a lot of attractions have come and gone. Disney likes to hold on to its successful rides, but some were too costly, or just not popular enough; others were just collateral damage for newer and more exciting rides (the fact that Disney World's Mr. Toad's Wild Ride closed still stings). These rides are lost, but not forgotten. Let us look back at the nostalgic graveyard of defunct Disney rides. 

1. Phantom Boats // Disneyland, 1955 – 1956

This ride never stood a chance. Lasting just a year, its big problem was that it was too boring. Originally called the Tomorrowland Boats, this ride featured slowly moving white vessels that visitors could drive around the lagoon. On August 16, 1955, they were rechristened The Phantom Boats and redesigned with tailfins that were apparently a mechanical nightmare; the boats left park-goers stranded in the middle of the lake and undoubtedly very unhappy. The boats' last appearance was in the summer of 1956, making it the first ride to be removed from Disneyland.

2. Submarine Voyage // Disneyland, 1956 - 1998

Inspired by the USS Nautilus, the first nuclear-powered submarine, The Submarine Voyage replaced the Phantom Boats. Passengers could board the Disneyland Nautilus—or one of the other seven submarines—for a fanciful re-creation of the actual craft's journey to the North Pole. Although the submarines never actually went underwater, bubble jets gave the illusion of diving deeper and props were scattered throughout the track. Patrons could see sea monsters, turtles, glowing fish, and even mermaids. You can check out this video from 1959 to see what it was like:

The ride stayed mostly the same for its duration, with the exception of a new coat of yellow paint in the mid-'80s. A similar ride opened in Disney World called 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea in 1971, and due to costs, the Florida ride was shut down in 1994, followed by the California version in 1998. The original Submarine Voyage was renovated to become a new ride. Today, you can hop in a submarine and see your favorite Disney fish in the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage. 

3. Flying Saucers // Disneyland, 1961 - 1966

The Flying Saucers ride was sort of a mix between bumper cars and air hockey. Giant saucers big enough for an average-sized person to sit on were propelled across an arena by air valves; riders shifted their weight to direct the craft where they wanted to go. It was popular, but suffered from a lot of problems when larger guests tried to ride. As a result, it closed for good in 1966. Today, the spot is occupied by Space Mountain.

4. Astro Jets // Disneyland, 1956 - 1966

Located in the heart of Tomorrowland, this delightfully retro-futuristic ride gave patrons a great view of the park. Each rocket was big enough to snugly fit two riders and came with a lever that made it go up and down. Rocket Jets, a similar spinning ride with more modern-looking jets, eventually replaced the ride in 1967.

5. Rainbow Mountain Stagecoach Ride // Disneyland, 1956 - 1959

The stagecoaches in Frontierland gave visitors a chance to get the feel for transportation in the Wild West. After deciding whether to sit up top or inside, riders were transported back in time and through the Living Desert. The scenery featured balancing boulders, cartoonish cacti, and interesting rock formations. Unfortunately, the stagecoaches had a tendency to tip over and spook the mules; breakaway harnesses resulted in stranded passengers and missing mules—yikes!

6. Rainbow Caverns Mine Train // Disneyland, 1956 - 1977 

The mine train also went through the Living Desert, but unlike the stagecoaches, this ride brought its passengers into the rainbow caverns. Riders were transported through a beautiful cavern illuminated by beautifully colorful lakes and waterfalls. After the ride, patrons exited through the Mineral Hall, where rocks glow with the power of a black light. 

The ride was expanded in 1960, and became the Mine Train Through Nature's Wonderland. This new and improved ride now featured robotic animals, fossils, and Cascade Peak, a large mountain complete with waterfall. The ride was replaced by the rollercoaster Big Thunder Mountain Railroad in 1979, and most of the remnants have been bulldozed or removed. 

7. Delta Dreamflight // Disney World, 1989 - 1998

This ride aimed to encourage visitors to travel the world, and more importantly, to use Delta Airlines to do it. The attraction featured a hodge-podge of projection screens, animatronics, and pop-up storybook style sets. Passengers waited in an area fashioned to look like a terminal, and climbed into painted blue cars. The guests would then “take off” and travel through the ride. The ride was replaced by Buzz Lightyear's Space Ranger Spin in 1998. 

SEE ALSO: 13 Facts About Disney’s Haunted Mansion

8. Adventure Thru Inner Space // Disneyland 1967 - 1985

Patrons of this ride would start by climbing into "Atommobiles." These cars would slowly enter a giant microscope, where the riders would then be "shrunk down" to microscopic size. (People waiting on line would watch the visitors ahead of them shrink and disappear.) After passing through the microscope, passengers were then shot into a snowflake. This simulation was created by moving the cars back and forth while bringing them through a dark tunnel. The tiny navigators emerged from the dark tunnel and were welcomed by gigantic falling snowflakes. As the riders shrunk in size, the sights changed: giant snowflakes became molecules, and molecules broke down to atoms. Up on top, a giant eye watched the ride through a microscope. The ride was eventually replaced by Star Tours in 1986.

9. PeopleMover // Disneyland 1967 - 1995

The PeopleMover was a lot like Florida’s Tomorrowland Transit Authority PeopleMover. Made to seem like the transportation mode of the future, these trains took patrons on a 16-minute ride around the park. The loading was done with some hustle: the train cars never stopped and doors closed automatically. After hopping inside, riders got a nice view of Tomorrowland. The ride was closed in 1995 in an effort to save money, but it remains standing.

10. Flight to the Moon // Disneyland 1967 – 1975

Previously called Rocket to the Moon, Flight to the Moon took place beside the Moonliner, the giant spaceship in the middle of Tomorrowland. At the time, the ship was the tallest thing in the park. The attraction inside was more like a simulation than a ride; visitors would sit in chairs surrounded by projectors, and the chairs would vibrate as the screens showed images of the moon. In 1975, the ride changed to Mission to Mars since, by then, humans had already been to the moon. No word on what the next iteration will be when we finally make it to Mars. 

11. Journey Into Imagination // Disney World 1983 - 1998 

Like many other Disney rides, this one has seen many different incarnations. The current ride is called Journey into Imagination with Figment, but Figment didn’t always have such a large role. In the original ride, the passengers glided through what seemed like clouds. A bearded man with a top hat and goggles would fly over to the guests and introduce himself as “Dreamfinder.” He drove a contraption that collected dreams and the guests came along for the ride. The visitors are shown multiple rooms with different themes, like art, literature, and science. Today, the ride focuses on the five senses and Figment is in every scene (although Dreamfinder is nowhere to be found).


7 Historic European Castles Virtually Rebuilt Before Your Very Eyes

A reconstruction of Spiš Castle in eastern Slovakia.
A reconstruction of Spiš Castle in eastern Slovakia.
Budget Direct

While some centuries-old castles are still standing tall, others haven’t withstood the ravages of time, war, or natural disaster quite as well. To give you an idea of what once was, Australia-based insurance company Budget Direct has digitally reconstructed seven of them for its blog, Simply Savvy.

Watch below as ruins across Europe transform back into the formidable forts and turreted castles they used to be, courtesy of a little modern-day magic we call GIF technology.

1. Samobor Castle // Samobor, Croatia

samobor castle
Samobor Castle in Samobor, Croatia
Budget Direct

The only remaining piece of the 13th-century castle built by Bohemia’s King Ottokar II is the base of the guard tower—the rest of the ruins are from an expansion that happened about 300 years later. It’s just a 10-minute walk from the Croatian city of Samobor, which bought the property in 1902.

2. Château Gaillard // Les Andelys, France

Château Gaillard in Les Andelys, France
Château Gaillard in Les Andelys, France
Budget Direct

King Richard I of England built Château Gaillard in just two years during the late 12th century as a fortress to protect the Duchy of Normandy, which belonged to England at the time, from French invasion. It didn’t last very long—France’s King Philip II captured it six years later.

3. Dunnottar Castle // Stonehaven, Scotland

Dunnottar Castle in Stonehaven, Scotland
Dunnottar Castle in Stonehaven, Scotland
Budget Direct

Dunnottar Castle overlooks the North Sea and is perhaps best known as the fortress that William Wallace (portrayed by Mel Gibson in 1995’s Braveheart) and Scottish forces won back from English occupation in 1297. Later, it became the place where the Scottish monarchy stored their crown jewels, which were smuggled to safety when Oliver Cromwell invaded during the 17th century.

4. Menlo Castle // Galway City, Ireland

Menlo Castle in Galway City, Ireland
Menlo Castle in Galway City, Ireland
Budget Direct

This ivy-covered Irish castle was built during the 16th century and all but destroyed in a fire in 1910. For those few centuries, it was home to the Blake family, English nobles who owned property all over the region.

5. Olsztyn Castle // Olsztyn, Poland

Olsztyn Castle in Olsztyn, Poland
Olsztyn Castle in Olsztyn, Poland
Budget Direct

The earliest known mention of Olsztyn Castle was in 1306, so we know it was constructed some time before then and expanded later that century by King Casimir III of Poland. It was severely damaged during wars with Sweden in the 17th and 18th centuries, but its highest tower—once a prison—still stands.

6. Spiš Castle // Spišské Podhradie, Slovakia

Spiš Castle in Spišské Podhradie, Slovakia
Spiš Castle in Spišské Podhradie, Slovakia
Budget Direct

Slovakia’s massive Spiš Castle was built in the 12th century to mark the boundary of the Hungarian kingdom and fell to ruin after a fire in 1780. However, 20th-century restoration efforts helped fortify the remaining rooms, and it was even used as a filming location for parts of 1996’s DragonHeart.

7. Poenari Castle // Valachia, Romania

Poenari Castle in Valachia, Romania
Poenari Castle in Valachia, Romania
Budget Direct

This 13th-century Romanian castle boasts one previous resident of some celebrity: Vlad the Impaler, or Vlad Dracula, who may have been an early influence for Bram Stoker’s vampire, Dracula. It also boasts a staggering 1480 stone steps, which you can still climb today.

[h/t Simply Savvy]

America’s 10 Most Hated Easter Candies

Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Whether you celebrate Easter as a religious holiday or not, it’s an opportune time to welcome the sunny, flora-filled season of spring with a basket or two of your favorite candy. And when it comes to deciding which Easter-themed confections belong in that basket, people have pretty strong opinions.

This year, CandyStore.com surveyed more than 19,000 customers to find out which sugary treats are widely considered the worst. If you’re a traditionalist, this may come as a shock: Cadbury Creme Eggs, Peeps, and solid chocolate bunnies are the top three on the list, and generic jelly beans landed in the ninth spot. While Peeps have long been polarizing, it’s a little surprising that the other three classics have so few supporters. Based on some comments left by participants, it seems like people are just really particular about the distinctions between certain types of candy.

Generic jelly beans, for example, were deemed old and bland, but people adore gourmet jelly beans, which were the fifth most popular Easter candy. Similarly, people thought Cadbury Creme Eggs were messy and low-quality, while Cadbury Mini Eggs—which topped the list of best candies—were considered inexplicably delicious and even “addictive.” And many candy lovers prefer hollow chocolate bunnies to solid ones, which people explained were simply “too much.” One participant even likened solid bunnies to bricks.

candystore.com's worst easter candies
The pretty pastel shades of bunny corn don't seem to be fooling the large contingent of candy corn haters.
CandyStore.com

If there’s one undeniable takeaway from the list of worst candies, it’s that a large portion of the population isn’t keen on chewy marshmallow treats in general. The eighth spot went to Hot Tamales Peeps, and Brach’s Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits—which one person christened “the zombie bunny catacomb statue candy”—sits at number six.

Take a look at the full list below, and read more enlightening (and entertaining) survey comments here.

  1. Cadbury Creme Eggs
  1. Peeps
  1. Solid chocolate bunnies
  1. Bunny Corn
  1. Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits
  1. Chocolate crosses
  1. Twix Eggs
  1. Hot Tamales Peeps
  1. Generic jelly beans
  1. Fluffy Stuff Cotton Tails

[h/t CandyStore.com]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER