The Perseid Meteor Shower Peaks Next Week—Here's How to Boost Your Chance of Seeing a Shooting Star

wisanuboonrawd/iStock via Getty Images
wisanuboonrawd/iStock via Getty Images

The Perseids—the most reliable and often the most dazzling meteor shower of the year—have been visible from Earth since July. Usually, each year around mid-August, the meteor shower peaks at around 60 or more shooting stars blazing across the sky every hour. In 2019, the spectacle occurs just days apart from a full moon, which will make it more difficult to view compared to previous years. But if you know when and were to look, you can boost your chances of catching a glimpse of the event.

When to See the Perseid Meteor Shower

As Business Insider reports, the Perseids are set to peak the night of Monday, August 12 into the morning of August 13. Just two days later on August 15, August's full moon (also called a sturgeon moon) will light up the night's sky. That means the Moon will already be significantly big and bright on Monday night and wash out many fainter shooting stars that would otherwise be visible.

But that's no reason to stay indoors at night. Though you probably won't see 100 or even 60 shooting stars per hour as have been recorded in the past, you may still be able to see the brightest meteors in the light of the large Moon. Fireballs—extra bright meteors like the one that was reported over New England last month—will be easiest to spot.

How to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower

To maximize your chances of catching the Perseids this year, look up on the night of August 11. The shower won't quite have reached its peak by then, but skies will be darker than they're expected to be later in the week. The Moon sets at 3 a.m. that night, and any time after that will give you your best shot at seeing a shooting star. Any meteors will appear to originate in the northeastern sky from the direction of the constellation Perseus, but they can be spotted anywhere.

If you don't have any luck on your first try, there's no harm heading outside the night of the shower's peak on the 12th. Anytime after midnight is generally the best time for meteor-viewing.

[h/t Business Insider]

A Super Pink Moon—the Biggest Supermoon of 2020—Is Coming In April

April's super pink moon will be extra big and bright (but still white).
April's super pink moon will be extra big and bright (but still white).
jakkapan21/iStock via Getty Images

The sky has already given us several spectacular reasons to look up this year. In addition to a few beautiful full moons, we’ve also gotten opportunities to see the moon share a “kiss” with Venus and even make Mars briefly disappear.

In early April, avid sky-gazers are in for another treat—a super pink moon, the biggest supermoon of 2020. This full moon is considered a supermoon because it coincides with the moon’s perigee, or the point in the moon’s monthly orbit when it’s closest to Earth. According to EarthSky, the lunar perigee occurs on April 7 at 2:08 p.m. EST, and the peak of the full moon follows just hours later, at 10:35 p.m. EST.

How a supermoon is different.

Since the super pink moon will be closer to Earth than any other full moon this year, it will be 2020’s biggest and brightest. It’s also the second of three consecutive supermoons, sandwiched between March’s worm moon and May’s flower moon. Because supermoons only appear about 7 percent bigger and 15 percent brighter than regular full moons, you might not notice a huge difference—but even the most ordinary full moon is pretty breathtaking, so the super pink moon is worth an upward glance when night falls on April 7.

The meaning of pink moon.

Despite its name, the super pink moon will still shine with a normal golden-white glow. As The Old Farmer’s Almanac explains, April’s full moon derives its misleading moniker from an eastern North American wildflower called Phlox subulata, or moss pink, that usually blooms in early April. It’s also called the paschal moon, since its timing helps the Catholic Church set the date for Easter (the word paschal means “of or relating to Easter”).

[h/t EarthSky]

A Full Worm Moon Is Coming

There aren't any worms on the moon.
There aren't any worms on the moon.
BalazsKovacs/iStock via Getty Images

You don’t have to be an early bird to catch a glimpse of next week’s full worm moon—it’ll reach its peak during the day on Monday, March 9, so feel free to look up any time after sundown that night.

As The Old Farmer’s Almanac explains, March’s full moon is known as the “worm moon” because the ground is usually soft enough for earthworm casts (small piles of worm excrement) to start appearing on the surface, and other signs of spring soon follow. It’s also sometimes called the “full sap moon,” since March is also the time of year when sugar maples start leaking sap.

This year’s worm or sap moon is a supermoon, meaning it occurs around the time of the Moon’s perigee, or the point during the Moon’s monthly orbit when it’s closest to Earth. Because March’s full moon is especially close to Earth, it’ll look slightly bigger and brighter than a regular full moon. It won’t technically be 2020’s biggest and brightest—according to EarthSky, that designation will go to the supermoon on April 8, which peaks even closer to the moon’s perigee.

That said, April’s supermoon will only be about 230 miles closer to us than March’s, so they’re definitely both worth an upward glance. May’s full moon, which peaks on May 7, finishes off the trifecta of 2020 full supermoons.

If you’re worried about a series of three consecutive supersized moons wreaking havoc on people’s behavior even more than normal moons allegedly do, rest easy: That’s probably just a myth.

[h/t The Old Farmer’s Almanac]

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