Marathon Karaoke Session Lands Man in Hospital With a Collapsed Lung

cookelma/iStock via Getty Images
cookelma/iStock via Getty Images

While over-imbibing is the usual culprit behind a fun night out gone wrong, it turns out that too much karaoke can be bad for your health, too. According to Newsweek, a 65-year-old man from eastern China was hospitalized with a collapsed lung after singing 10 high-pitched karaoke songs in a row.

“I was very excited in the heat of the moment and after singing a few songs with very high notes, I found myself having breathing difficulties,” the man, who was identified only by his last name, Wang, said in a video posted to the Chinese platform PearVideo.

Since Wang had belted out the same tunes plenty of times before, he decided to ignore the pain that he felt in his left lung as he was performing and simply sing through it. After his condition worsened over the next day, Wang was taken to the hospital.

In the same video, Dr. Peng Bin-fei confirmed that the injury was most likely a direct result of the man’s energetic commitment to hitting the high notes, and advised that karaoke enthusiasts should limit their performances to a maximum of two hours. (For everyone's sake.)

A collapsed lung, or pneumothorax, happens “when air leaks into the space between your lung and chest wall. This air pushes on the outside of your lung and makes it collapse,” according to the Mayo Clinic. Medical professionals can suck out the air with a needle or small tube, but the condition can be life-threatening.

Since sometimes a pneumothorax can occur on its own, it’s always a good idea to seek medical attention if you suddenly experience uncharacteristic chest pain or shortness of breath. Often, it’s the result of a blunt-force injury to the chest or damage from a lung disease. Newsweek mentioned a recent pneumothorax case that was caused by yet another perhaps unexpected culprit: electronic cigarettes. Doctors found black spots and a hole in the collapsed lung of a Florida teenager.

Unlike electronic cigarettes, there’s no compelling reason to quit karaoke altogether, as long as you’re doing it safely. But if you feel like your lungs are straining against that High C, maybe pass the microphone off to the nearest soprano.

[h/t Newsweek]

Keep Your Cat Busy With a Board Game That Doubles as a Scratch Pad

Cheerble
Cheerble

No matter how much you love playing with your cat, waving a feather toy in front of its face can get monotonous after a while (for the both of you). To shake up playtime, the Cheerble three-in-one board game looks to provide your feline housemate with hours of hands-free entertainment.

Cheerble's board game, which is currently raising money on Kickstarter, is designed to keep even the most restless cats stimulated. The first component of the game is the electronic Cheerble ball, which rolls on its own when your cat touches it with their paw or nose—no remote control required. And on days when your cat is especially energetic, you can adjust the ball's settings to roll and bounce in a way that matches their stamina.

Cheerable cat toy on Kickstarter.
Cheerble

The Cheerble balls are meant to pair with the Cheerble game board, which consists of a box that has plenty of room for balls to roll around. The board is also covered on one side with a platform that has holes big enough for your cat to fit their paws through, so they can hunt the balls like a game of Whack-a-Mole. And if your cat ever loses interest in chasing the ball, the board also includes a built-in scratch pad and fluffy wand toy to slap around. A simplified version of the board game includes the scratch pad without the wand or hole maze, so you can tailor your purchase for your cat's interests.

Cheerble cat board game.
Cheerble

Since launching its campaign on Kickstarter on April 23, Cheerble has raised over $128,000, already blowing past its initial goal of $6416. You can back the Kickstarter today to claim a Cheerble product, with $32 getting you a ball and $58 getting you the board game. You can make your pledge here, with shipping estimated for July 2020.

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Bigfoot Is Selling His California Home, According to a Creative Real Estate Listing

Zillow
Zillow

When Bigfoot isn't lurking in the woods, he's apparently reading, baking, and practicing social distancing in his home in the California Redwoods. At least that's what's depicted in a new real estate listing spotted by Laughing Squid. The post also suggests that Bigfoot is looking for a change, and the cryptid's former home can be yours for just under $1 million.

The house for sale at 5649 Hillside Drive in Felton, California, has a lot to offer, with five bedrooms and three baths spread out over 1872 square feet. In case that wasn't enough to entice buyers, the sellers also held a Bigfoot photo shoot to show off the property.

The images featured in the listing show a person in a Bigfoot costume enjoying the secluded sanctuary. According to the photos, he uses the home's ample deck space to play the ukulele and read the paper with his coffee. Indoors, he can be seen reading a book about edible mushrooms, baking cookies, and doing yoga in the workout room. Bigfoot also appears to be obeying his state's social distancing guidelines, with pictures showing him chatting with a friend on a video call and wearing a face mask.

Bigfoot reading the newspaper.
Zillow

Bigfoot doing yoga.
Zillow

Bigfoot baking cookies.
Zillow

Bigfoot reading book.
Zillow

Bigfoot on the computer.
Zillow

Bigfoot wearing a face mask.
Zillow

While this particular property may not be home to a real Bigfoot, the California Redwoods are considered the Bigfoot capital of the world. The region is the site of the Bigfoot Discovery Museum, and numerous Bigfoot sightings have been reported there over the years.

If you're interested in living like a sasquatch, you can contact the house's agent through Zillow. The home is listed for an asking price of $999,000.

[h/t Laughing Squid]