Reading Makes People Feel Happier and Smarter, According to New Poll

m-imagephotography/iStock via Getty Images
m-imagephotography/iStock via Getty Images

Reading subscription service Scribd wants Americans to read more, and they've recently discovered that a vast majority of Americans would like to see that happen, too.

In late May, the company tasked The Harris Poll with conducting a survey on America's reading habits. They asked more than 2000 adults a variety of questions, such as: Does reading make you feel smarter? Does it enhance your well-being? How does reading compare to scrolling through social media? Among some of the poll's most interesting takeaways:

  • The average person has four hours and 26 minutes of free time each week, but 81 percent of Americans do not read as much as they would like to. Instead of reading, Americans typically use that time to stream movies and/or TV shows (86 percent of people said they do this for a minimum of 15 minutes a day), perform chores (84 percent), and/or scroll through social media (74 percent).
  • Of the individuals polled, 52 percent said they read for at least 15 minutes a day, but only 22 percent reported reading an hour or more a day; 35 percent said they wish they were reading more.
  • It’s a fact that reading even just 15 pages a day comes with a host of benefits, including a more substantial knowledge base and a better vocabulary. When asked how they felt after reading, 55 percent of respondents said they felt more relaxed, 33 percent felt happier, and 32 percent felt smarter. In fact, 75 percent of those polled believe that people who read regularly are smarter than those who do not.
  • Reading makes people feel more accomplished, too: 69 percent said they felt more accomplished after reading versus only 45 percent who felt that way after scrolling through social media.
  • 55 percent of respondents said they only need to read for 15 minutes to feel like they've accomplished something. (Fun fact: People who read books for 30 minutes every day may live an average of 23 months longer than non-readers according to a 2016 study.)
  • Social media can be a time sucker, but according to the poll, it might also be draining our intelligence. 32 percent of respondents said they felt smarter after reading while only 7 percent felt smarter after “reading” social media. 5 percent of people said reading was a waste of their time whereas a whopping 35 percent of people considered spending time on social media a waste of time.

Despite wanting to read more, people aren’t doing it enough: 39 percent of people said they don’t read because they don’t have enough time, while by 22 percent that said that "it’s easier to do other things"—like watching Netflix. For that latter group, Scribd recommends listening to audiobooks, which is better than not reading at all.

First Editions of Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Other Jane Austen Novels Can Be Yours

GeorgiosArt, iStock via Getty Images
GeorgiosArt, iStock via Getty Images

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen hasn't been out of print since its initial publication in 1813. Now, fans of the British classic have a chance to own an original copy. On February 20, first editions of all of Austen's beloved books—including Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion—are hitting the auction block.

Born in England in 1775, Austen is one of the most influential British writers of all time. Her stories are famous for their witty commentary of English society, and they've been adapted into everything from modern rom-coms to an apocalyptic zombie novel.

First editions of her books from the early 19th century will go up for bid at an auction organized by Swann Auction Galleries in New York. A three-volume print of Pride and Prejudice from 1813 is expected to fetch between $20,000 and $30,000. The copy of Emma, which was printed in 1816, has an estimated value of $15,000 to $20,000, while Sense and Sensibility from 1816 is projected to earn $30,000 to $40,000. The first edition of Sense of Sensibility (published as "By a Lady") comes from a run of no more than 1000 copies that sold out in less than two years. The two other novels up for bid are Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park.

The Austen works for sale are part of Swann's upcoming auction of fine books and manuscripts. A signed limited-edition copy of the Virginia Woolf short story "Kew Gardens" will be sold at the same event. You can view the items here before the auction goes live on Thursday.

First-edition of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.
Swann Auction Galleries

First-edition of Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen.
Swann Auction Galleries

The Library of Congress Needs Help Transcribing Walt Whitman’s Poems and Letters

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain
Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

From O Captain! My Captain! to Song of Myself, Walt Whitman produced some of literature's most memorable poems. But for every work published in his lifetime, the writer left behind many manuscripts that weren't shared with the world. Now, the Library of Congress is asking for the public's help in reviewing thousands of Whitman's handwritten documents, including letters, poems, and other writings.

May 31, 2019, marked the 200th anniversary of Whitman's birth, and the LOC is honoring the occasion by making a push to transcribe its Walt Whitman archives. The institution is home to the world's largest Whitman manuscript collection, which includes original copies of his poems as well as more personal works. In letters written in 1840 and 1841, Whitman expressed his support for presidential candidate Martin Van Buren and his disdain for small-town life in Woodbury, New York. On one printed copy of O Captain! My Captain!, the poet has scribbled his edits by hand.

The collection the LOC wants to transcribe originally consisted of close to 4000 documents. More than half of those have been completed so far, and roughly 1860 transcriptions still need to be reviewed. Anyone can read the documents that need approval and officially add them to the Whitman archive.

The Library of Congress depends on the public for many of its transcription projects. In 2018, it launched a campaign to transcribe its Lincoln collection, and it crowdsourced a project transcribing thousands of suffragist documents in 2019.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER