15 Things You Might Not Know About Beetlejuice

Warner Home Video
Warner Home Video

Thanks to its bonkers blend of comedy and horror, Beetlejuice became an instant hit with audiences when it was released on March 30, 1988—and even more so in the 30 years since, as younger viewers have discovered it on television, DVD, and streaming. The movie also helped to establish Tim Burton, who made his feature directorial debut with Pee-wee's Big Adventure in 1985, as one of Hollywood's most unique new artists. But there were plenty of obstacles that came with bringing this ghost with the most to the big screen, as well as some stellar benefits to its success. As the news continues to spread that a long-talked-about sequel to the film is finally, actually (hopefully) happening, we're looking back at some fun facts about the cult classic that started it all.

1. EARLY DRAFTS OF THE SCRIPT WERE FAR LESS WHIMSICAL.

Screenwriter Michael McDowell's original script was far darker than the final script, which was rewritten by screenwriters Larry Wilson and Warren Skaaren. Originally it imagined Beetlejuice as a winged demon whose human form was that of a small Middle Eastern man, and his plan for the Deetzes was more about rape and murder than mischief and marriage. Also, the Maitlands’ car crash was far more gruesome.

2. AN EARLY DRAFT OFFERED A MAITLAND HOME FOR EVERYONE.

The original ending of McDowell’s screenplay had Beetlejuice being destroyed by an exorcism and the Maitlands’ house shrinking down to the size of Adam's model town. Instead of sharing their home with the Deetz family, they move into the model house and renovate it to look like their full-scale version did before the family arrived. Also, the Deetz parents move back to New York, leaving Lydia to be raised by the Maitlands in Connecticut.

3. TIM BURTON WANTED WARREN SKAAREN TO BRING SOME PLAYFULNESS AND MUSIC TO THE SCRIPT.

Part of the rewrites by Warren Skaaren included specific music suggestions, like Lydia lip-syncing to Percy Sledge's "When a Man Loves a Woman." The final film substituted R&B songs for calypso music like Harry Belafonte’s hits "Day-O" and "Jump in the Line (Shake, Senora).”

4. SAMMY DAVIS JR. WAS BURTON'S FIRST CHOICE FOR BEETLEJUICE.

Tim Burton reportedly wanted Rat Pack member Sammy Davis Jr.—who was 63 years old at the time—to play Beetlejuice. Producer David Geffen suggested actor Michael Keaton, who was ultimately chosen and would go on to appear in two other Burton films: Batman and Batman Returns.

5. IT WON AN OSCAR.

Makeup artists Ve Neill, Steve LaPorte, and Robert Short won the 1989 Academy Award for Best Makeup.

6. ANJELICA HUSTON WAS VERY NEARLY DELIA DEETZ.

Anjelica Huston was originally cast to play Delia Deetz, but had to bow out due to an illness. Actress Catherine O’Hara initially declined Burton’s offer for the part, but accepted after Burton flew out to meet with her and personally convince her to take it. O'Hara met—and eventually married—production designer Bo Welch while working on Beetlejuice.

7. GEENA DAVIS AND MICHAEL KEATON NEEDED NO CONVINCING.

Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin in Beetlejuice (1988)
Warner Home Video

Both Geena Davis and Michael Keaton immediately signed on to the film after meeting with Burton, but he allegedly had to beg Golden Age Hollywood star Sylvia Sidney to play the afterlife detective, Juno. Sidney would go on to work with Burton again on her last film, the 1996 alien invasion comedy Mars Attacks!. Sidney passed away in 1999.

8. LYDIA WAS A ROLE LOTS OF INGÉNUES REJECTED.

Actresses Lori Loughlin, Diane Lane, Sarah Jessica Parker, Brooke Shields, Justine Bateman, Molly Ringwald, and Jennifer Connelly are among the young actresses who allegedly turned down the role of Lydia Deetz. Juliette Lewis auditioned, but Winona Ryder won the part once Burton saw her performance in the teen dramedy Lucas.

9. BEETLEJUICE WAS NEARLY CALLED SCARED SHEETLESS.

Warner Bros. executives didn’t like the name Beetlejuice and pushed to have it changed to House Ghosts. Burton jokingly suggested Scared Sheetless as an alternate name, and was appalled when Warner Bros. actually considered it.

10. BEETLEJUICE WAS NAMED AFTER A STAR.

Beetlejuice was named for Betelgeuse, a star in the constellation Orion.

11. "DAY-O" PLAYED AT OTHO'S REAL-LIFE FUNERAL.

Harry Belafonte’s song “Day-O,” which is in the film’s memorable song and dance number, was the final song played at the memorial for actor Glenn Shadix (who played Otho in the film), who passed away in 2010.

12. BEETLEJUICE IS BARELY IN HIS OWN MOVIE.

Michael Keaton, Alec Baldwin, and Geena Davis in 'Beetlejuice' (1988)
Warner Home Video

Beetlejuice only appears in 17.5 minutes of the 92-minute film.

13. TEST AUDIENCES ENCOURAGED A HAPPIER ENDING FOR BEETLEJUICE.

Test audiences responded to Keaton's green-haired ghoul so well that Burton's team went back to create an upbeat epilogue that featured Beetlejuice hassling a sawed-in-half woman before being hexed by a witch doctor. An earlier draft had him stuck in the Maitlands' model town and plagued by sandworms.

14. BEETLEJUICE INSPIRED AN ANIMATED SERIES.

A cartoon spinoff of Beetlejuice ran for 94 episodes. The show completely reimagined the relationship between Lydia Deetz and the titular character, with Beetlejuice taking her on wild adventures in the "Neitherworld." The Maitlands don't exist in this spinoff, but Lydia got a cast of classmates as well as ghoulish friends like a skeleton bodybuilder and a tap-dancing spider.

15. A BEETLEJUICE SEQUEL IS IN THE WORKS—AGAIN! NO, REALLY!

The box office success of Beetlejuice inspired the development of a sequel in 1990 called Beetlejuice Goes Hawaiian. However, Batman Returns became Burton's priority at the time, and the sequel's prospects went cold until 2011, when Warner Bros. hired Dark Shadows scribe Seth Grahame-Smith to produce a new take on Beetlejuice 2, with Keaton, Ryder, and Burton all in talks to become involved in the potential sequel.

But years passed and the project was only teased until December 2014, when the rumor mill started buzzing once again after Tim Burton told IGN: “There is a script, and I would love to work with [Michael Keaton] again. I think there is now a better chance than ever … I miss that character. There’s something that’s cathartic and amazing about it. I think it’s closer than ever.”

In 2015, adding fuel to the excitement, Winona Ryder told Seth Meyers: “I think I can confirm it. It was very hush-hush top secret … but then [Tim Burton] was doing some press for Big Eyes and and he did an on-camera interview and he said, ‘Oh yeah, we’re doing it, and Winona’s going to be in it.’ ... If he said it, I can say it.”

As of late 2017, the project was at a bit of a standstill, but had just brought on a new writer to rework the script. Much like its title character, this project may not be quite dead yet.

Turn Your LEGO Bricks Into a Drone With the Flybrix Drone Kit

Flyxbrix/FatBrain
Flyxbrix/FatBrain

Now more than ever, it’s important to have a good hobby. Of course, a lot of people—maybe even you—have been obsessed with learning TikTok dances and baking sourdough bread for the last few months, but those hobbies can wear out their welcome pretty fast. So if you or someone you love is looking for something that’s a little more intellectually stimulating, you need to check out the Flybrix LEGO drone kit from Fat Brain Toys.

What is a Flybrix LEGO Drone Kit?

The Flybrix drone kit lets you build your own drones out of LEGO bricks and fly them around your house using your smartphone as a remote control (via Bluetooth). The kit itself comes with absolutely everything you need to start flying almost immediately, including a bag of 56-plus LEGO bricks, a LEGO figure pilot, eight quick-connect motors, eight propellers, a propeller wrench, a pre-programmed Flybrix flight board PCB, a USB data cord, a LiPo battery, and a USB LiPo battery charger. All you’ll have to do is download the Flybrix Configuration Software, the Bluetooth Flight Control App, and access online instructions and tutorials.

Experiment with your own designs.

The Flybrix LEGO drone kit is specifically designed to promote exploration and experimentation. All the components are tough and can totally withstand a few crash landings, so you can build and rebuild your own drones until you come up with the perfect design. Then you can do it all again. Try different motor arrangements, add your own LEGO bricks, experiment with different shapes—this kit is a wannabe engineer’s dream.

For the more advanced STEM learners out there, Flybrix lets you experiment with coding and block-based coding. It uses an arduino-based hackable circuit board, and the Flybrix app has advanced features that let you try your hand at software design.

Who is the Flybrix LEGO Drone Kit for?

Flybrix is a really fun way to introduce a number of core STEM concepts, which makes it ideal for kids—and technically, that’s who it was designed for. But because engineering and coding can get a little complicated, the recommended age for independent experimentation is 13 and up. However, kids younger than 13 can certainly work on Flybrix drones with the help of their parents. In fact, it actually makes a fantastic family hobby.

Ready to start building your own LEGO drones? Click here to order your Flybrix kit today for $198.

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David Lynch Is Sharing How He's Keeping Busy at Home in New YouTube Series

Pascal Le Segretain, Getty Images
Pascal Le Segretain, Getty Images

David Lynch, the director of some of the most surreal movies from recent decades, enjoys a relaxing home improvement project as much as the rest of us. As Pitchfork reports, Lynch has launched a new video series on YouTube sharing the various ways he's staying busy at home.

The series, titled "What Is David Working on Today?", debuted with its first installment on Tuesday, May 28. In it, the filmmaker tells viewers he's replacing the drain in his sink and varnishing a wooden stand. In addition to providing a peek into his home life, Lynch also drops some thought-provoking tidbits, like "water is weird."

Fixing the furniture in his home isn't the only thing Lynch has been up to during the COVID-19 pandemic. He also wrote, directed, and animated a 10-minute short titled Pożar, and since early May, he has been uploading daily weather reports. If life in quarantine doesn't already feel like a David Lynch film, diving into the director's YouTube channel may change that.

This isn't Lynch's first time creating uncharacteristically ordinary content. Even after gaining success in the industry, he directed commercials for everything from pasta to pregnancy tests.

[h/t Pitchfork]