PetSmart Is Selling Guinea Pig Costumes for Halloween

PetSmart
PetSmart

Regardless of whether or not animals enjoy it, some people can't resist dressing up their pets in wigs and sequins when October rolls around. This has become so common that it's easy to find Halloween costumes for dogs and even cats in stores and online. This year, PetSmart is making sure some of the smallest animals they cater to don't feel left out: The pet supply chain is selling a line of costumes for guinea pigs just in time for Halloween, Yahoo! reports.

PetSmart has featured outfits for guinea pigs in its Halloween collection for the past few years. The 2019 line includes a few trendy options, like a mermaid, unicorn, and superhero. There are also classic costumes, such as a witch and a pumpkin, made to fit your pet's small, stubby body. And if cuteness is your main goal, it's tough to beat the miniature pineapple costume.

Guinea pig in Halloween costume.
PetSmart

Guinea pig in Halloween costume.
PetSmart

Guinea pig in Halloween costume.
PetSmart

Guinea pig in Halloween costume.
PetSmart

Guinea pig in Halloween costume.
PetSmart

It's never too early to start planning your Halloween costume, especially if you intend to match with your pet. PetSmart's seasonal guinea pig line is already available to purchase online, so you can get your pet costume shopping out of the way early this year. Prices range from $4 to $7.

PetSmart may have expanded its costume options to include guinea pigs, but there are still plenty of nontraditional pets that get ignored by retailers around Halloween. This has forced some pet owners to get creative—you can see the amazing results here.

[h/t Yahoo!]

Meet LiLou: The World's First Airport Therapy Pig

Kseniia Derzhavina/iStock via Getty Images
Kseniia Derzhavina/iStock via Getty Images

There's a new reason to get to the airport early—you might run into a therapy pig who's there to make your trip a little easier. As Reuters reports, LiLou the Juliana pig is a member of San Francisco International Airport's "Wag Brigade," a therapy animal program designed to ease stress and anxiety in travelers.

Aside from her snout and potbelly, LiLou can be recognized by her captain's hat and red "hoof" polish. She spends the day with guests who are happy to take a break from the pressures of traveling. She might comfort them by posing for a selfie, playing a song on her toy keyboard, or offering them a head to pet.

After bringing joy to people's day, LiLou goes home to her San Francisco apartment where she lives with her owner, Tatyana Danilova. In her free time, she goes on daily walks and snacks on organic vegetables. She even has her own Instagram account.

Airports around the world are embracing the benefits therapy animals can bring to customers. The Wag Brigade program at San Francisco includes a number of dogs, and earlier this year, the Aberdeen Airport in Scotland debuted its own "canine crew" of dogs trained to make travelers feel safe and happy. Therapy miniature horses have even been used at an airport in Kentucky. According to the San Francisco Airport, LiLiou is the world's first airport therapy pig.

To see LiLou turn on the charm, check out the video below.

[h/t Reuters]

Sssspectacular: Tree Snakes in Australia Can Actually Jump

sirichai_raksue/iStock via Getty Images
sirichai_raksue/iStock via Getty Images

Ophidiophobia, or fear of snakes, is common among humans. We avoid snakes in the wild, have nightmares about snakes at night, and recoil at snakes on television. We might even be born with the aversion. When researchers showed babies photos of snakes and spiders, their tiny pupils dilated, indicating an arousal response to these ancestral threats.

If you really want to scare a baby, show them footage of an Australian tree snake. Thanks to researchers at Virginia Tech, we now know these non-venomous snakes of the genus Dendrelaphis can become airborne, propelling themselves around treetops like sentient Silly String.

That’s Dendrelaphis pictus, which was caught zipping through the air in 2010. After looking at footage previously filmed by her advisor Jake Socha, Virginia Tech Ph.D. candidate Michelle Graham headed for Australia and built a kind of American Ninja Warrior course for snakes out of PVC piping and tree branches. Graham observed that the snakes tend to spot their landing target, then spring upward. The momentum gets them across gaps that would otherwise not be practical to cross.

Graham next plans to investigate why snakes feel compelled to jump. They might feel a need to escape, or continue moving, or do it because they can. Two scientific papers due in 2020 could provide answers.

Dendrelaphis isn’t the only kind of snake with propulsive capabilities. The Chrysopelea genus includes five species found in Southeast Asia and China, among other places, that can glide through the air.

[h/t National Geographic]

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