35 Facts About Bruce Springsteen

Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation
Chris Jackson/Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation

Today, Mr. Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen—"The Boss," the patron saint of the working man, the protector of all that is holy and righteous on E Street—turns 70 years old. To celebrate his big day, here are 35 things you need to know about the rocker and his E Street band.

1. Barack Obama is a big Bruce Springsteen fan.

Bruce Springsteen has fans in high places. Barack Obama has said that there are "a handful of people who enter into your lives through their music and tell the American people's story. Bruce Springsteen is one of those people." Obama also said that he ran for President because he couldn't be Bruce Springsteen.

2. Joe Strummer was also a fan.

Another major Springsteen fan was the late Joe Strummer. The Clash frontman was asked about the Boss for a TV documentary in the mid-1990s and responded with a fax that said, among other things, "Bruce is great ... If you don't agree with that, you're a pretentious Martian from Venus" and "The DJ puts on 'Racing in the Streets' and life seems worth living again."

3. Dr. Ruth had some songwriting advice for the musician.

Dr. Ruth Westheimer

once visited Springsteen backstage at a show. She told him she liked what he said in his songs about love and sex, but she wished he would mention contraception once in a while. The Boss's reply? "Gee, it’s going to be tough to get the word contraception into a song."

4. He was close friends and collaborators with Warren Zevon.

The late Warren Zevon was Springsteen's friend, fan and collaborator. When Zevon was diagnosed with mesothelioma, he refused any treatment he thought would incapacitate him and headed to the studio—with plenty of friends in tow—to record his final album, The Wind. Springsteen provided background vocals and electric guitar for two songs, one of which won the Grammy for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal. Springsteen later appeared on a tribute album to Zevon, performing his song "My Ride's Here."

5. As a kid, he was not a great student.

Springsteen had a bit of a hard time in school. "In the third grade, a nun stuffed me in a garbage can under her desk because she said that's where I belonged," Springsteen said. "I also had the distinction of being the only altar boy knocked down by a priest during mass." Years later, at Ocean County College, legend has it that his fellow students petitioned the administration to have him expelled.

6. He also had a bit of a following among his fellow students.

Of course, Springsteen had his fans, too. Some of the girls in his high school approached the administration with a petition demanding that Bruce's band at the time, the Castiles, be given more attention and respect.

7. He grew up surrounded by the sweet smells of chocolate.

When the Springsteens were living in Freehold, New Jersey, their house was near a Nestle's factory. When the wind was just right, they could smell chocolate and coffee all day long.

8. The first song he ever learned to play on the guitar was a Beatles song.

The first song Springsteen learned to play on the guitar was the Beatles' "Twist and Shout." He has played it hundreds more times over the years at concerts, often as an encore.

9. There really is an E Street.

It runs northeast through the New Jersey shore town of Belmar. According to Springsteen lore, the band took its name from the street because original keyboard player David Sancious' mother lived there and allowed the band to rehearse in her house.

The titular avenue of "Tenth Avenue Freeze Out" is also in Belmar.

10. "Tenth Avenue Freeze Out" was guitarist Steven Van Zandt's debut with the E Street Band.

Van Zandt came up with the idea for the horn intro and became the de facto arranger when he sang the line for the horn section.

11. The working title for Darkness on the Edge of Town was American Madness.

American Madness

was also the title of a 1932 Frank Capra movie.

12. He originally wrote "Hungry Heart" for The Ramones.

In 1979, Springsteen saw the Ramones play at the Fast Lane in Asbury Park, New Jersey. He met the band and Joey Ramone asked Springsteen to write a song for them. Springsteen wrote "Hungry Heart" with the intention of giving it to them, but hung on to it at the urging of his manager.

13. Springsteen originally saw his first wife in a music video.

The first place Springsteen saw his first wife, Julianne Phillips? In one of .38 Special's music videos. She later appeared toward the end of Springsteen's video for "Glory Days." She appears in the video with Patti Scialfa, Springsteen's second (and current) wife.

14. He went home from the movies with a random fan to prove a point.

Springsteen lore has it that the musician was once spotted in a movie theater watching Woody Allen's Stardust Memories (which comments on artist/fan relations). The fan who saw him challenged the singer to prove he didn't regard his own fans with the contempt as the Allen stand-in in the movie by coming to meet his parents ... so he did. "And for two hours I was in this kid’s house, talking with these people," Springsteen recalled. "They were really nice. They cooked me up all this food, watermelon, and the guy gave me a ride back to my hotel a few hours later."

15. The "chicken man" he references in "Atlantic City" was a mob boss.

When Springsteen sings that "they blew up the Chicken Man in Philly last night" in "Atlantic City," he's referring to Phil Testa, the underboss of the Philadelphia crime family under Angelo Bruno. Bruno was killed in 1980, and Testa, who got his nickname from his involvement in a poultry business, succeeded him as don of the family. His nine-month reign ended when conspirators in the family placed a nail bomb under his porch and detonated it when he walked out the front door.

16. Springsteen caused a security scare at elvis presley's graceland.

After a 1976 concert in Memphis, a presumably inebriated Springsteen went to Graceland at three in the morning, jumped the wall, and ran to the front door. Security grabbed him before he could make it to the door and sent him packing. Knocking wouldn't have done much good, anyway. Elvis was in Lake Tahoe at the time.

17. He's a talented photographer.

According to Frank Stefanko, a photographer and friend Springsteen's, The Boss is a pretty talented photographer. "Riding in my car he'll notice unusual things—weird Jersey billboards, funny signs on the sides of diners—and it's all registering," Stefanko said. "A [nonphotographer] will just walk by and never see it. Bruce travels all over the world, taking pictures—it's quite a collection of work. Will he ever show it? I don't know. He doesn't make a fuss over it. But I know he has that artist's eye—his eyes, his brain, they're always working."

18. He has been heard in space.

In December 1999, the crew of the Space Shuttle Discovery was woken up with Springsteen's song "Rendezvous" on the day they were scheduled to rendezvous with the Hubble Space Telescope.

19. He wrote "Fire" for Elvis Presley.

In May 1977, Springsteen and Van Zandt went to an Elvis Presley concert in Philadelphia. A few days later Bruce wrote "Fire," and allegedly sent a demo of the song to Presley that summer, hoping he might cover it. Whether the tape got sent or not, Presley died that August and Springsteen wound up giving "Fire" to Robert Gordon. Gordon's version of the song was covered by the The Pointer Sisters, who made it a hit in 1979.

20. Monmouth University is home to an archive of Springsteen artifacts.

New Jersey's Monmouth University is home to The Bruce Springsteen Archives and Center for American Music which, according to the website, "serves as the official archival repository for Bruce Springsteen’s written works, photographs, periodicals, and artifacts." There are more than 35,000 pieces in the collection, which is available to view by appointment only.

21. "Kitty's Back" was inspired by a jersey shore strip club.

The title for "Kitty's Back," from The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle, was inspired by a neon sign Springsteen saw promoting the return of popular stripper a Jersey Shore club.

22. Someone may have paid a lot of money for Springsteen's screen door.

According to local legend, a fan bought the screen door of the house at 68 South Street in Freehold, New Jersey—a house Springsteen had once lived in—from the homeowner in the early '80s, thinking it was the screen door mentioned in "Thunder Road."

23. He played a concert in the gym of his former grammar school in 1996.

In November 1996, Springsteen played a benefit concert in the gymnasium of his former grade school, the St. Rose of Lima School in Freehold, New Jersey. Only Freehold residents were allowed to purchase tickets.

24. He's been the subject of a symposium for musicologists and educators.

In September 2005, and again in 2009, "Glory Days: A Bruce Springsteen Symposium" drew a crowd of 330 educators, journalists, historians, musicologists, and fans to hear more than 100 presentations on Springsteen scholarship.

25. He turned Asbury Park's The Stone Pony into a tourist attraction.

Thanks to the Boss, the Stone Pony in Asbury Park, New Jersey is one of the most famous music venues in the world. It's so closely associated with Springsteen that you might think he got his start at there, but the club only opened in 1974, when Springsteen already had two albums out.

26. He has a minor planet named after him.

It's technical designation is 23990 Springsteen.

27. The fortune teller in "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)" is real.

Madam Marie

, the fortune-teller in "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)," is as real as E Street. Marie Castello told fortunes on the Asbury Park boardwalk from 1932 until her death in 2008 at age 93. The fortune-telling booth is still there and is run by Madam Marie's family.

28. There's a Muppet modeled after him.

Sesame Street

has performed a couple of different Springsteen covers, including "Born to Add" and Barn in the USA." The tunes have been performed by a Muppet named Bruce Stringbean who is backed by the S Street Band.

29. The E Street Band made their live debut in 1974.

The live debut of the E Street Band, with Max Weinberg on drums and Roy Bittan on piano, occurred on September 20, 1974 at the Tower Theater in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. That show marked the first time that Springsteen earned $5000 for a night's work.

30. It took 16 hours to create Clarence Clemons' "Jungleland" sax solo.

When the band was recording, "Jungleland," the epic that closes Born to Run, it took 16 hours (with no bathroom breaks, at least according to Clemons) to work out and record Clarence Clemons' sax solo. When the Boss pointed this out to Clemons, he was surprised. He thought it had only been five.

31. Springsteen and Clemons' first meeting is the stuff of legends.

According to Springsteen lore, Bruce first met Clarence "Big Man" Clemons while playing at a club in Asbury Park. “A rainy, windy night it was, and when I opened the door the whole thing flew off its hinges and blew away down the street," Clemons, who passed away in 2011, once recalled. "The band were onstage, but staring at me framed in the doorway. Bruce and I looked at each other and didn't say anything, we just knew. We knew we were the missing links in each other's lives. He was what I'd been searching for.”

Springsteen liked to use the story as proof that Clemons, the E Street Band's personal Paul Bunyan, could blow the doors off any room he was in.

32. One might consider October 19, 1984, "the night Rosalita died."

As far back as the song was written, almost every regular set at a Springsteen concert was closed with an extended version of "Rosalita (Come Out Tonight)." But on that fateful night in Tacoma, Washington, Rosie was dropped from set list. Springsteen biographer Dave Marsh wrote that this was done to "disrupt the ritual expectations of the fanatic fans ... establishing through a burst of creativity just who was boss ... he'd liberated the show from an albatross, a song that was too long and had long since stopped breathing."

33. Ernest Carter made a memorable impact on "Born to Run."

Ernest "Boom" Carter doesn't have the same name recognition as some other E Streeters, but even if you're only a casual Springsteen fan, you've heard his work. Carter's only performance with Springsteen was his drum track on "Born to Run." Carter's successor to the drum throne, Max Weinberg, has said that he could never reproduce Carter's drum parts in concert and eventually stopped trying.

34. Max Weinberg isn't a fan of Darkness on the Edge of Town.

Weinberg isn't a fan of Darkness on the Edge of Town because his performance on "Something in the Night" bothers him. Toward the end of the song, the band cuts out and Bruce starts singing over Max's drums. A few seconds into it, Max loses the beat and noticeably slows down the song.

35. Stephen king thinks he's be perfect in The stand.

If you've ever read Stephen King's The Stand, you probably can't help but imagine Springsteen as the character Larry Underwood. Well, King felt the same way, saying the in the foreword for the reissue of the novel that Springsteen, based solely on his music videos, would've been a perfect choice for an adaptation of the book.

In related news: It was announced earlier this year that The Stand will be adapted into a TV series. The series' current working title? "Radio Nowhere," which is a track off Springsteen's 2007 album Magic.

This story has been updated for 2019.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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Jimi Hendrix’s Connection to Hogan's Alley—Vancouver's Lost Black Neighborhood

Marjut Valakivi, Public Domain // Wikimedia Commons
Marjut Valakivi, Public Domain // Wikimedia Commons

From the early 1900s through the 1960s, Hogan’s Alley—the unofficial name of Park Lane, an alley that ran between Union and Prior Streets in Vancouver’s Strathcona neighborhood—was a multicultural area that hosted an enclave of Black Canadians, largely immigrants and their descendants, who had resettled from American states to find work, generally on the Great Northern Railway system.

As a result of rampant racism and housing discrimination within the city, many of Vancouver's Black residents also migrated there, establishing numerous businesses including Pullman Porters’ Club, famed eatery Vie’s Chicken and Steak House, and the African Methodist Episcopal Fountain Chapel, the city’s only Black church at the time, which was partly spearheaded by Zenora Rose Hendrix—a pillar of the community and grandmother to legendary rocker Jimi Hendrix. Yet, despite the neighborhood's thriving business and cultural scene, city officials didn't hesitate to level Hogan's Alley and displace its many residents when it got in the way of an ill-conceived government construction project that was eventually abandoned altogether.

As national uprisings in support of the Black Lives Matter movement continue, racism has been declared a public health crisis throughout the U.S. following the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and other Black citizens at the hands of law enforcement. Standing in solidarity with Americans calling for an end to police militarization, cultural advocates in Vancouver have been outraged by the harsh treatment of protesters in the United States. Growing frustration in the area has prompted a demand for the once-bustling, historic Black community of Hogan’s Alley to be recultivated as a cultural, commercial, and residential center for Black Vancouverites.

The Rise and Fall of Hogan's Alley

Ross and Nora Hendrix, Jimi Hendrix's paternal grandparents.Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Zenora “Nora” Rose Hendrix was born in the States, but became a much-admired member of the Hogan's Alley community. Nora (who, like her grandson, was a talented musician) was a cook at Vie's, a restaurant that was frequented by jazz icons including Lena Horne, Ella Fitzgerald, and Louis Armstrong during concert stops.

Jimi, who was raised in Seattle, forged a strong bond with the area during summer visits with his grandparents and via a short stint living with them, during which he attended first grade at Vancouver’s Dawson Annex School. He returned to the area in the early 1960s, where he regularly performed at local venues like Dante’s Inferno and Smilin’ Buddha.

At the same time Jimi was building his reputation as a world-renowned musician, the city of Vancouver began work on a development project to replace and expand the Georgia viaduct. To accommodate its redevelopment, which included the construction of a new interurban freeway, parts of the city would need to be destroyed. Hogan’s Alley was among the neighborhoods that city authorities had deemed disposable because, according to the Vancouver Heritage Fund, it had a reputation as “a center of squalor, immorality, and crime.”

Vancouver’s Chinatown was yet another neighborhood that was at the top of the list to be razed to make way for the Georgia viaduct and its new freeway, but Chinatown residents and the Strathcona Property Owners and Tenants Association (SPOTA) were able to effectively protest and shield that area from demolition. Though many of Hogan’s Alley’s Black residents participated in protests against the urban renewal agenda that was aimed at wiping out their neighborhood, they were unsuccessful.

In 1967, work on the first phase of construction began, effectively erasing the western half of Hogan’s Alley and forcing many Black families to leave the area in search of new housing and better opportunities. Though the building of the freeway was eventually stopped, it was too late for the residents of Hogan’s Alley.

Gone But Not Forgotten

Hogan's Alley: Then and NowMike via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

In the near-half-century since the demise of Hogan’s Alley, no other cultural epicenter for Vancouver’s Black community has sprung up to take its place. Today, even within the city, the story of Hogan’s Alley and its dismantling is largely unknown—though there have been various efforts made to ensure that the neighborhood and its importance to the city’s history are not forgotten.

When the city revealed its plans to remove the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts in 2015, the announcement received a lot of attention in the area. In June 2020 activists—including members of the Hogan's Alley Society, a nonprofit organization that works to highlight the contributions of Black Vancouverites to the city’s history—held a peaceful protest wherein they occupied the viaducts in order to bring attention to the role the structures played in the decimation of Hogan's Alley. While they're happy to see the viaducts go, the protestors want to make sure that the city fulfills its promise to erect a Black Cultural Center in the structures' place and restore a vital part of Vancouver's lost Black history.

Dr. June Francis, chair of the Hogan’s Alley Society, told Global News the viaducts were “a monument to the displacement and the oppression of the Black community ... [Hogan’s Alley] was erased by the actions of the city.”

While the city promised to build a cultural center where Hogan's Alley once stood, Francis said two years have passed with no actions taken to fulfill that commitment. "I expect the city, actually, to come out with a definitive statement to these young people to say 'We believe in your future and here is our response to you,'" she said.

A Shrine to Jimi

Vancouver's Jimi Hendrix ShrineRunran via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

In 2019, Nora Hendrix Place—a three-story, 52-unit, modular housing facility—was opened in the former Hogan’s Alley area to provide temporary shelter to the city’s homeless population. According to The Star, “The building will be run by the Portland Hotel Society and have a focus on supporting marginalized groups experiencing homelessness, while also including design elements shaped by Black culture.” But Nora’s famous grandson hasn't been forgotten either.

In the 1990s, a Jimi Hendrix Shrine—a small, fire engine red temple—was created where Vie’s once stood. It was an homage to Jimi’s career and the time he spent in Hogan’s Alley, complete with vinyl records, concert flyers, and letters from Jimi to his grandmother. Though the space is currently closed, its creator, Vincent Fodera, hopes to not only upgrade the shrine but to eventually have a 32-foot statue of Jimi towering over it.

While few physical reminders of Hogan’s Alley remain today, thanks to the lasting contributions of the area’s residents—including the Hendrix family—and the tireless efforts of its preservation advocates, the legacy of Hogan’s Alley’s will hopefully once again become an indelible part of the cultural fabric of Vancouver and its history.