Recall Alert: Nestlé Cookie Dough May Contain Bits of Rubber

ThitareeSarmkasat/iStock via Getty Images
ThitareeSarmkasat/iStock via Getty Images

The holiday season—a.k.a. cookie baking season—is officially upon us. Before heating up your oven, check the labels on any pre-made cookie dough mixtures you have in your fridge at home. As Newsweek reports, Nestlé has voluntarily recalled more than two dozen of its ready-to-bake cookie dough products after finding bits of rubber in some batches.

Some of Nestlé's most popular items, like the tubs and logs of its Toll House chocolate chip cookie dough, are included in the 2019 recall. The decision to pull the products was made after the company received reports of "food-grade pieces of rubber" in some cookie doughs. According to a statement from Nestlé, the source of the rubber contamination has been identified and fixed. No consumers have reported getting sick from the cookie dough so far.

The recall consists entirely of ready-to-bake refrigerated cookie doughs with a batch code anywhere from 9189 to 9295. To find a product's batch code, look on the back of the package for the number listed after the "use or freeze-by" date and before the number 5753. If you have any of the recalled items in your fridge, just throw them away.

Items under the Nestlé Toll House Morsels, Nestlé Toll House Ice Cream Sandwiches, Nestlé Toll House Edible Cookie Dough, or Nestlé Professionals labels are not affected by the recall and are safe to eat.

You can find all 26 products recalled by Nestlé in the list below.

Simply Delicious Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough (18oz)
Simply Delicious Nestlé Toll House Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough (18oz)
Simply Delicious Nestlé Toll House Sugar Cookie Dough (18oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Chub (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Chub (30oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Lovers Club Tub (80oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Tub (36oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Tub (80oz)
Nestlé Toll House Fall'n Leaves Cookie Dough (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Frozen II Cookie Dough (14oz)
Nestlé Toll House Holiday Chocolate Chip Tree Sprinkle (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Monster Munch (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Pinch of Grinch Cookie Dough (14oz)
Nestlé Toll House Triple Chip Cookie Dough Bar (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Ultimate Chocolate Chip Lovers (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Ultimate Turtles Cookie Bar (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House White Chip Macadamia Nut (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Mini Chocolate Chip Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Bar (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Sugar Cookie Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Peanut Butter Cookie Bar (16oz)
M&M'S Everyday Cookie Dough (14oz)
M&M'S Ghouls Mix Cookie Dough (14oz)
M&M'S Holiday Cookie Dough (14oz)

[h/t Newsweek]

12 Creative Ways to Spend Your FSA Money Before the Deadline

stockfour/iStock via Getty Images
stockfour/iStock via Getty Images

If you have a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), chances are, time is running out for you to use that cash. Depending on your employer’s rules, if you don’t spend your FSA money by the end of the grace period, you potentially lose some of it. Lost cash is never a good thing.

For those unfamiliar, an FSA is an employer-sponsored spending account. You deposit pre-tax dollars into the account, and you can spend that money on a number of health care expenses. It’s kind of like a Health Savings Account (HSA), but with a few big differences—namely, your HSA funds roll over from year to year, so there’s no deadline to spend it all. With an FSA, though, most of your funds expire at the end of the year. Bummer.

The good news is: The law allows employers to roll $500 over into the new year and also offer a grace period of up to two and a half months to use that cash (March 15). Depending on your employer, you might not even have that long, though. The deadline is fast approaching for many account holders, so if you have to use your FSA money soon, here are a handful of creative ways to spend it.

1. Buy some new shades.

Head to the optometrist, get an eye prescription, then use your FSA funds to buy some new specs or shades. Contact lenses and solution are also covered.

You can also buy reading glasses with your FSA money, and you don’t even need a prescription.

2. Try acupuncture.

Scientists are divided on the efficacy of acupuncture, but some studies show it’s useful for treating chronic pain, arthritis, and even depression. If you’ve been curious about the treatment, now's a good time to try it: Your FSA money will cover acupuncture sessions in some cases. You can even buy an acupressure mat without a prescription.

If you’d rather go to a chiropractor, your FSA funds cover those visits, too.

3. Stock up on staples.

If you’re running low on standard over-the-counter meds, good news: Most of them are FSA-eligible. This includes headache medicine, pain relievers, antacids, heartburn meds, and anything else your heart (or other parts of your body) desires.

There’s one big caveat, though: Most of these require a prescription in order to be eligible, so you may have to make an appointment with your doctor first. The FSA store tells you which over-the-counter items require a prescription.

4. Treat your feet.

Give your feet a break with a pair of massaging gel shoe inserts. They’re FSA-eligible, along with a few other foot care products, including arch braces, toe cushions, and callus trimmers.

In some cases, foot massagers or circulators may be covered, too. For example, here’s one that’s available via the FSA store, no prescription necessary.

5. Get clear skin.

Yep—acne treatments, toner, and other skin care products are all eligible for FSA spending. Again, most of these require a prescription for reimbursement, but don’t let that deter you. Your doctor is familiar with the rules and you shouldn’t have trouble getting a prescription. And, as WageWorks points out, your prescription also lasts for a year. Check the rules of your FSA plan to see if you need a separate prescription for each item, or if you can include multiple products or drug categories on a single prescription.

While we’re on the topic of faces, lip balm is another great way to spend your FSA funds—and you don’t need a prescription for that. There’s also no prescription necessary for this vibrating face massager.

6. Fill your medicine cabinet.

If your medicine cabinet is getting bare, or you don’t have one to begin with, stock it with a handful of FSA-eligible items. Here are some items that don’t require a prescription:

You can also stock up on first aid kits. You don’t need a prescription to buy those, and many of them come with pain relievers and other medicine.

7. Make sure you’re covered in the bedroom.

Condoms are FSA-eligible, and so are pregnancy tests, monitors, and fertility kits. Female contraceptives are also covered when you have a prescription.

8. Prepare for your upcoming vacation.

If you have a vacation planned this year, use your FSA money to stock up on trip essentials. For example:

9. Get a better night’s sleep.

If you have trouble sleeping, sleep aids are eligible, though you’ll need a prescription. If you want to try a sleep mask, many of them are eligible without a prescription. For example, there’s this relaxing sleep mask and this thermal eye mask.

For those nights you’re sleeping off a cold or flu, a vaporizer can make a big difference, and those are eligible, too (no prescription required). Bed warmers like this one are often covered, too.

Your FSA funds likely cover more than you realize, so if you have to use them up by the deadline, get creative. This list should help you get started, and many drugstores will tell you which items are FSA-eligible when you shop online.

10. Go to the dentist.

While basics like toothpaste and cosmetic procedures like whitening treatments aren’t FSA eligible, most of the expenses you incur at your dentist’s office are. That includes co-pays and deductibles as well as fees for cleanings, x-rays, fillings, and even the cost of braces. There are also some products you can buy over-the-counter without ever visiting the dentist. Some mouthguards that prevent you from grinding your teeth at night are eligible, as are cleaning solutions for retainers and dentures.

11. Try some new gadgets.

If you still have some extra cash to burn, it’s a great time to try some expensive high-tech devices that you’ve been curious about but might not otherwise want to splurge on. The list includes light therapy treatments for acne, vibrating nausea relief bands, electrical stimulation devices for chronic pain, cloud-connected stethoscopes, and smart thermometers.

12. Head to Amazon.

There are plenty of FSA-eligible items available on Amazon, including items for foot health, cold and allergy medication, eye care, and first-aid kits. Find out more details on how to spend your FSA money on Amazon here.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

Peaches Purchased From Target and ALDI Are Being Recalled For Possible Salmonella Contamination

A.R.T.Paola, Unsplash
A.R.T.Paola, Unsplash

As of this week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed that 68 people across nine states—including Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin—have fallen ill with Salmonella poisoning. The likely culprit is peaches.

CNN reports that the outbreak has been linked to peaches from Wawona Packing Company sold in 2-pound clear plastic bags. Since a number of patients bought them from ALDI, the grocery store has issued a recall of organic and regular Wawona-brand peaches from stores in about 20 states, including New York, Florida, Michigan, Virginia, and South Dakota. You can see if your state is on the list here.

According to the Minnesota Department of Health, some sick Minnesotans had bought their peaches from Target or other stores, and Target is also supposedly working on removing Wawona peaches from its shelves.

In other words: We don’t yet know the extent of the outbreak, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) investigation is ongoing. Because it’s still unclear where the contaminated peaches have been sold, you should avoid buying any Wawona-brand peaches right now. If you have any at home, throw them away—and if you’ve frozen any fresh peaches since June 1 and can’t remember what brand they are, it’s probably best to toss those, too.

You can find out more about the FDA investigation and check for future updates here.

[h/t CNN]