A Show of Support: The Creators of the Sports Bra Are Now in the National Inventors Hall of Fame

jacoblund/iStock via Getty Images
jacoblund/iStock via Getty Images

In 1977, Lisa Lindahl, Hinda Miller, and Polly Smith wanted to find a way to make exercise more comfortable for women. So they sewed two jockstraps together to create a prototype for what would become known as the sports bra, and revolutionized the fitness apparel industry in the process. Brands like Nike, Champion, and Under Armour all market versions of the trio's invention. And now all three of them will be cementing their place in history with membership in the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

According to WCAX, the three Vermont residents—who named their creation the Jogbra—were honored during a ceremony at the 2020 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas this week for their work on the bra, which had a radical impact on the health of women.

The idea initially came from Lindahl, an avid runner living in Burlington, Vermont, who found that conventional bras lacked the support or design that would make physical exertion comfortable. She wanted a bra with stable straps, breathable fabric, and compression. So she asked Smith, a childhood friend and costume designer, for help.

Smith sewed two men’s athletic supporters together, which Lindahl tested while running. Later, the garment was modified with non-chafing seams and an elastic band for support. Lindahl partnered with Miller to co-found Jogbra Inc. in 1977, with the garment being patented in 1979. The sports bra market grew into a multi-billion dollar enterprise, and their invention is credited with helping millions of women take up running.

Lindahl was CEO of Jogbra until it was sold to Playtex in 1990. Miller stayed with the company through 1997 and later became a Vermont state senator. Smith became a designer for the Jim Henson Company and earned seven daytime Emmys.

The three women will also be honored in May in Washington, D.C. for the Greatest Celebration of American Innovation event.

[h/t WCAX]

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Remembering Sara Little Turnbull, Whose Bra Cup Design Became the N95 Mask

Design innovator Sara Little Turnbull.
Design innovator Sara Little Turnbull.
Photo Credit: © Center for Design Institute

The coronavirus pandemic has made something of a celebrity out of the N95 mask, a particle-filtering face covering that’s long been used to protect wearers from inhaling or exhaling pathogens. (The “95” refers to the fact it can block 95 percent of airborne particles.)

Like most nondescript and pervasive products, not many people stop to think about where it came from. Now, owing to the attention placed on it as a key tool in the health care professional’s fight against coronavirus, the woman behind the mask has come to the forefront. Her name is Sara Little Turnbull, and she designed what would become the N95 based on the shape of a bra cup.

A design consultant, Turnbull was working with the 3M company in 1958 in their gift wrap and fabric division when she was exposed to Shapeen, a non-woven material made of polymers and used for decorative ribbons. Turnbull was fascinated by the molded version of Shapeen and devised the first-ever pre-made bows for gift wrap.

Turnbull didn’t stop there. She saw endless possibilities in Shapeen and assembled an audience of 3M executives to present a number of ideas she had for products—more than 100 in all—using the material. At the presentation, which she titled “Why,” she impressed 3M with the scope of Shapeen's potential. The company quickly enlisted her to work on a design for a molded bra cup.

But Turnbull had another, arguably more important notion. At the time, she was taking care of three ailing family members who were under the care of doctors. Turnbull was often in a medical setting and noticed health care workers were constantly adjusting thin masks that tied in the back. She returned to 3M with the idea of using that same molded material to make a mask that would fit more comfortably on the face.

Again, 3M saw potential in Turnbull’s idea. By 1961, they introduced a non-woven lightweight medical mask based on her concept, with elastic bands instead of strings, an aluminum nose clip, and a form-fitting "bubble" shape. (The bra patent was approved in 1962.) Though innovative, the mask couldn't block pathogens for medical use and was marketed for dust filtration instead. An improved respirator hit the market in 1972 that was suitable for other industrial purposes. As the mask’s filtration evolved, so did its usefulness. In 1995, the N95 respirator was introduced in the health care field, fulfilling Turnbull's original ambition.

Though Turnbull had been relegated to a nondescript part of 3M, she had an extensive background in design, graduating from the Parsons School of Design in 1939 and later becoming the decorating editor of House Beautiful magazine. After Turnbull wrote an article taking companies to task for not designing products suitable for the end user, she was hired by 3M. As a consultant, she also collaborated with Corning, Revlon, General Mills, and Ford, among others.

After Turnbull died in 2015, the Sara Little Turnbull Center for Design Institute was formed, which offers information to the public on the value of design and supports the efforts of disadvantaged women's design education. Turnbull's vast archive of material is available to view by appointment. A foundation in her name also provides educational grants. The “Little,” incidentally, was in acknowledgment of her height. At 4 feet, 11 inches tall, Turnbull wasn’t terribly physically imposing. But her contributions were gigantic.

[h/t NPR]