The Reason Your Local ALDI Grocery Store Doesn’t Have a Phone Number

Matthew Horwood/Getty Images
Matthew Horwood/Getty Images

ALDI’s streamlined layout, reliably low prices, and lack of name-brand products all make grocery shopping feel much less overwhelming and more personal than it often does at other stores. Having said that, you can’t exactly ring up your friendly neighborhood ALDI the way you would with many local grocery stores.

Search online for a nearby ALDI and you’ll notice that the same phone number is listed next to every location: (855) 955-2534. If you call that number, an automated voice says this:

“Thank you for contacting ALDI U.S. Due to our limited store staffing, the phone numbers for our stores are unlisted. This is part of our savings model that allows us to pass on significant savings to our customers.”

As Reader’s Digest explains, there are only three to five employees working in any given store at a time, and they’re focused on serving customers in person. With fewer workers on the payroll, ALDI can keep its prices as low as possible, directly benefiting customers.

In other words, the company doesn’t want to pay people to answer questions that customers could often answer themselves, since so much information is available on the internet these days. To make sure the answers really are easy to find, ALDI’s website boasts a robust FAQ section, featuring questions like “Why do I need a quarter to use a shopping cart at ALDI?” and “If you don’t have the brands I know, how can I be sure of the quality?” Other tabs include a list of product recalls, a section on Instacart delivery, and a store locator with each location's hours.

If you can’t find the information you’re looking for on the website, there is an option to contact ALDI via email, or call their corporate customer service line during regular business hours at (800) 325-7894.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]

The Scottish Play: Why Actors Won’t Call Macbeth by Its Title

Macbeth and the three witches in Shakespeare's possibly cursed play.
Macbeth and the three witches in Shakespeare's possibly cursed play.
Photos.com/iStock via Getty Images

If you see someone burst from the doors of a theater, spin around three times, spit over their left shoulder, and shout out a Shakespearean phrase or curse word, it’s likely they just uttered “Macbeth” inside the building and are trying to keep a very famous curse at bay.

As the story goes, saying “Macbeth” in a theater when you’re not rehearsing or performing the play can cause disaster to befall the production. Instead, actors commonly refer to it as “the Bard’s play” or “the Scottish play.”

According to History.com, the curse of Macbeth originated after a string of freak accidents occurred during early performances of Shakespeare’s 1606 play. In the very first show, the actor portraying Lady Macbeth unexpectedly died, and Shakespeare himself had to take over the role. In a later one, an actor stabbed King Duncan with an actual dagger rather than a prop knife, killing him on stage.

Macbeth has continued to cause calamity after calamity throughout its four centuries of existence. Harold Norman died from stab wounds sustained during a fight scene while playing Macbeth in 1947, and there have been several high-profile audience riots at various performances, too—the worst was at New York’s Astor Place Opera House in 1849, when fans of British actor William Charles Macready clashed with those of American actor Edwin Forrest. Twenty-two people died, and more than 100 others were injured.

Since Macbeth has been around for so long and performed so often, it’s not exactly surprising its history contains some tragic moments. But many believe these accidents are the result of a curse actual witches cast on the play when Shakespeare first debuted it.

As the Royal Shakespeare Company explains, Shakespeare really did his research when creating the three witches in Macbeth: “Fillet of a fenny snake,” “eye of newt and toe of frog,” and other lines from the “Song of the Witches” were supposedly taken from “real” witches’ spells from the time. According to legend, a coven of witches decided to punish him for using their magic by cursing his play.

For skeptics, Christopher Eccleston—who played Macbeth in a Royal Shakespeare Company production in 2018—offers a slightly more believable theory about the origin of the curse. In the interview below, he explains how theater companies that were struggling financially would stage Macbeth, a crowd favorite, to guarantee ticket sales. Therefore, saying “Macbeth” in a theater was an admission that things weren’t going well for your company.

[h/t History.com]

The Smart Reason Grocery Stores Offer Pint-Sized Shopping Carts for Kids

A toddler in action with a miniature grocery shopping cart.
A toddler in action with a miniature grocery shopping cart.
romrodinka/iStock via Getty Images

While watching little kids push miniature shopping carts through grocery aisles can definitely be amusing, stores like Food Lion and Trader Joe’s don’t keep them in stock solely to entertain their grown-up customers.

In reality, it’s more about occupying the kids so their parents can shop without too many interruptions—and if you’ve ever witnessed a toddler have an all-out meltdown in the middle of a supermarket, you might have an idea of just how important that can be.

But that’s not the only reason so many stores have a few pint-sized carts on hand. As Joe Pinsker reports for The Atlantic, children enjoy them so much that they sometimes inadvertently influence their parents to continue shopping at a particular grocery store.

“Children have a lot to do with what goes in a household’s grocery cart,” Meg Major, vice president of content at Winsight Grocery Business, told Pinsker. “I do think it’s a loyalty builder for kids that get a vote to say, ‘Let’s go to Store X.’”

This rang true for Silicon Valley parent Raj Singh, who told Pinsker his son’s affinity for the miniature carts at Trader Joe’s caused them to become “more of a Trader Joe’s family.”

In other words, if your kid is asking to visit a store you know will guarantee a fun, drama-free shopping trip, becoming a repeat customer seems like a no-brainer. Having said that, the tiny vehicles don’t always make for a smooth errand. When Target introduced them to 72 stores in August 2016, a blogger started a movement called “Moms Against Stupid Tiny Carts,” which called for the removal of what she referred to as “vehicles of mass destruction.” She wasn’t the only parent who was less than thrilled with their kids’ new freedom to fill their own carts with toys and drive them around at breakneck speed—the backlash was so great that Target removed the carts the very next month.

All things considered, online grocery shopping doesn’t seem like a bad idea.

[h/t The Atlantic]

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