15 Celebration-Worthy Facts About Chinese New Year

istock
istock

Happy Chinese New Year! Also known as the Spring Festival, this upcoming holiday is packed full of traditions and symbolism. Here’s everything you need to know about the shindig.

1. The Chinese New Year doesn’t always fall on the same date.

China adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1912, but this holiday is based on the ancient Chinese, or lunar, calendar. Chinese New Year falls on the second new moon after winter solstice (somewhere between January 21st and February 19th). This year, Chinese New Year is February 19.

2. The New Year is China’s most important holiday.

It’s also China’s longest: The holiday is observed for 15 days. Technically, only the first three days are a statutory holiday, but most Chinese citizens will have the time from New Year’s Eve to the sixth day off from work.

3. San Francisco holds the largest Chinese New Year celebration outside of China.

The California gold rush of 1849 brought many people to the West Coast, including Chinese immigrants who worked on the railroads. Eager to share their culture with other Californians, these immigrants adopted the American tradition of a parade to celebrate their New Year. Since then, the event has become extremely popular—over a million people are expected to attend the parade this year.

4. The Chinese have celebrated the New Year for thousands of years.

The first Chinese New Year was celebrated during ancient times. According to mythology, a monster called Nian would appear at the end of each winter to ravage China and kill its people. The townsfolk used bright lights, loud noises, and the color red to scare the predator away. That’s why you see so many red lanterns and firework displays during the holiday. The Chinese invented fireworks in the 12th century, making them the first to use the explosives in a New Year’s celebration.

5. One sixth of the world’s population celebrates Chinese New Year.

The holiday isn’t just for the citizens of China. Countries with large Chinese populations like Taiwan and Singapore celebrate as well.

6. All cleaning is done before the celebration.

People participating in the Chinese New Year festivities will rigorously clean their homes on the 20th day of the 12th lunar month in preparation. This tidying up is symbolic of starting over fresh in the New Year. Some believe that the cleaning will sweep away the evil spirits or bad luck associated with the previous year. During the first day of the New Year, cleaning the house or washing one’s hair is discouraged because it could wash away good luck.

7. The dragon dance is believed to ward off evil spirits.

Unlike their Western cousins, Chinese dragons are friendly creatures associated with good luck, power, wisdom, and rain clouds. The dragon dance is a ceremony performed to scare off evil spirits and bad luck. Long dragons are constructed from wood, fabric, paper, or plastic and are controlled by poles connected to their bottoms; the longer the creation, the luckier it is believed to be. Pole bearers manipulate the dragon to make it appear to dance to the beat of a drum. It’s harder than it looks! The performers must be perfectly synchronized or the whole movement will be thrown off.

8. There are 12 animals in the Chinese zodiac.

According to ancient folklore, the order of the zodiacs was determined by a race orchestrated by the Jade Emperor in which the animals had to cross a river to get to the finish line. The rat finished first because it rode on the naïve ox’s back (the ox came in second). A powerful swimmer, the tiger came in third. The rabbit jumped on rocks to avoid the water. The story goes on like this until we reach the pig, which finished in last place because it took a nap.

Some legends mention a thirteenth animal: the cat. According to one legend, the cat also rode on the ox’s back, but was pushed off by the rat and drowned. Another story suggests that the rat gave the cat the wrong date and the feline missed the race entirely. Both stories result in explaining why cats are always chasing rats.

9. During Chinese New Year, keep your black clothes in your closet.

Color symbolism is an important part of the festivities. Black represents death, so it’s wise to steer clear of that color. Instead, wear bright colors like red, which symbolizes good fortune.

10. Children sleep with money under their pillows.

Elders will award youngsters with red envelopes filled with money in an effort to bring more happiness and good fortune. The contents are less important than the envelope itself, as the act of giving symbolizes good luck. Some children will sleep on their envelopes for seven days before opening to make their loot even luckier, and parents will also slip envelopes under their children’s pillows while they sleep, not unlike the tooth fairy.

11. Everyone turns one year older.

Renri, the seventh day of celebration, is considered the day that all human beings were created. As a result, everyone turns one year older on this day—sort of like a national birthday.

12. Fu signs are sometimes placed upside down.

Red diamond-shaped signs depicting the fu character are commonly placed on or above doors during Chinese New year. The symbol signifies good luck, so by placing it upside down, the residents allow the luck to pour down into the household.

13. On the last day of the celebration, everyone releases lanterns into the sky.

Elaborate paper lanterns that come in many different shapes and sizes are released on Chap Goh Mei (or the Lantern Festival), the fifteenth day of the New Year. Some see this practice as symbolically letting go of the old self to become a new person. Many will write riddles on their lanterns for others to try to solve.

14. Chap Goh Mei is like Valentine’s Day.

The final day of Chinese New Year is also considered a day ripe for love. Many single women will write their phone numbers on mandarin oranges before tossing them into the river. Men waiting downstream will collect the fruits and eat them. The sweetest one means the couple will have the best luck together.

15. 2015 is the year of the goat.

If you were born in 1919, 1931, 1943, 1967, 1979, 1991, or 2003, this is your year! As a “goat,” your lucky colors are brown, red, and purple. Your supposed best months are August and November, and your lucky flowers are primroses and carnations. People with this zodiac are supposed to be kind, amicable, and stable.

The ChopBox Smart Cutting Board Has a Food Scale, Timer, and Knife Sharper Built Right Into It

ChopBox
ChopBox

When it comes to furnishing your kitchen with all of the appliances necessary to cook night in and night out, you’ll probably find yourself running out of counter space in a hurry. The ChopBox, which is available on Indiegogo and dubs itself “The World’s First Smart Cutting Board,” looks to fix that by cramming a bunch of kitchen necessities right into one cutting board.

In addition to giving you a knife-resistant bamboo surface to slice and dice on, the ChopBox features a built-in digital scale that weighs up to 6.6 pounds of food, a nine-hour kitchen timer, and two knife sharpeners. It also sports a groove on its surface to catch any liquid runoff that may be produced by the food and has a second pull-out cutting board that doubles as a serving tray.

There’s a 254nm UVC light featured on the board, which the company says “is guaranteed to kill 99.99% of germs and bacteria" after a minute of exposure. If you’re more of a traditionalist when it comes to cleanliness, the ChopBox is completely waterproof (but not dishwasher-safe) so you can wash and scrub to your heart’s content without worry. 

According to the company, a single one-hour charge will give you 30 days of battery life, and can be recharged through a Micro USB port.

The ChopBox reached its $10,000 crowdfunding goal just 10 minutes after launching its campaign, but you can still contribute at different tiers. Once it’s officially released, the ChopBox will retail for $200, but you can get one for $100 if you pledge now. You can purchase the ChopBox on Indiegogo here.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

12 Things You Might Not Know About Juneteenth

Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

There's more than one Independence Day in the U.S. On June 19, 1865, General Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas, and announced enslaved people were now free. Since then, June 19 has been celebrated as Juneteenth across the nation. Here's what you should know about the historic event and celebration.

1. Enslaved people had already been emancipated—they just didn’t know it.

The June 19 announcement came more than two and a half years after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. So technically, from the Union's perspective, the 250,000 enslaved people in Texas were already free—but none of them were aware of it, and no one was in a rush to inform them.

2. There are many theories as to why the Emancipation Proclamation wasn’t enforced in Texas.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendering to Union General Ulysses S Grant at the close of the American Civil War, at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia on April 9, 1865.
Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendering to Union General Ulysses S Grant at the close of the American Civil War, at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia on April 9, 1865.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

News traveled slowly back in those days—it took Confederate soldiers in western Texas more than two months to hear that Robert E. Lee had surrendered at Appomattox. Still, some have struggled to explain the 30-month gap between Lincoln’s proclamation and the enslaved people’s freedom, leading to speculation that some Texans suppressed the announcement. Other theories include that the original messenger was murdered to prevent the information from being relayed or that the federal government purposely delayed the announcement to Texas to get one more cotton harvest out of the enslaved workers. But the real reason is probably that Lincoln's proclamation simply wasn't enforceable in the rebel states before the end of the war.

3. The announcement actually urged freedmen and freedwomen to stay with their former owners.

General Order No. 3, as read by General Granger, said:

"The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere."

4. What followed was known as “the scatter.”


Internet Archive Book Images, Flickr // No known copyright restrictions

Most freedpeople weren't terribly interested in staying with the people who had enslaved them, even if pay was involved. In fact, some were leaving before Granger had finished making the announcement. What followed became known as "the scatter,," when droves of former enslaved people left the state to find family members or more welcoming accommodations in northern regions.

5. Not all enslaved people were freed instantly.

Texas is a large state, and General Granger's order (and the troops needed to enforce it) were slow to spread. According to historian James Smallwood, many enslavers deliberately suppressed the information until after the harvest, and some beyond that. In July 1867 there were two separate reports of enslaved people being freed, and one report of a Texas horse thief named Alex Simpson whose enslaved people were only freed after his hanging in 1868.

6. Freedom created other problems.

Despite the announcement, Texas slave owners weren't too eager to part with what they felt was their property. When freedpeople tried to leave, many of them were beaten, lynched, or murdered. "They would catch [freed slaves] swimming across [the] Sabine River and shoot them," a former enslaved person named Susan Merritt recalled.

7. There were limited options for celebrating.

A monument in Houston's Emancipation Park.
A monument in Houston's Emancipation Park.
2C2KPhotography, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

When freedpeople tried to celebrate the first anniversary of the announcement a year later, they were faced with a problem: Segregation laws were expanding rapidly, and there were no public places or parks they were permitted to use. So, in the 1870s, former enslaved people pooled together $800 and purchased 10 acres of land, which they deemed "Emancipation Park." It was the only public park and swimming pool in the Houston area that was open to African Americans until the 1950s.

8. Juneteenth celebrations waned for several decades.

It wasn't because people no longer wanted to celebrate freedom—but, as Slate so eloquently put it, "it's difficult to celebrate freedom when your life is defined by oppression on all sides." Juneteenth celebrations waned during the era of Jim Crow laws until the civil rights movement of the 1960s, when the Poor People's March planned by Martin Luther King Jr. was purposely scheduled to coincide with the date. The march brought Juneteenth back to the forefront, and when march participants took the celebrations back to their home states, the holiday was reborn.

9. Texas was the first state to declare Juneteenth a state holiday.

Texas deemed the holiday worthy of statewide recognition in 1980, becoming the first state to do so.

10. Juneteeth is still not a federal holiday.

Though most states now officially recognize Juneteenth, it's still not a national holiday. As a senator, Barack Obama co-sponsored legislation to make Juneteenth a national holiday, though it didn't pass then or while he was president. One supporter of the idea is 93-year-old Opal Lee—in 2016, when she was 90, Lee began walking from state to state to draw attention to the cause.

11. The Juneteenth flag is full of symbolism.

a mock-up of the Juneteenth flag
iStock

Juneteenth flag designer L.J. Graf packed lots of meaning into her design. The colors red, white, and blue echo the American flag to symbolize that the enslaved people and their descendants were Americans. The star in the middle pays homage to Texas, while the bursting "new star" on the "horizon" of the red and blue fields represents a new freedom and a new people.

12. Juneteenth traditions vary across the U.S.

As the tradition of Juneteenth spread across the U.S., different localities put different spins on celebrations. In southern states, the holiday is traditionally celebrated with oral histories and readings, "red soda water" or strawberry soda, and barbecues. Some states serve up Marcus Garvey salad with red, green, and black beans, in honor of the black nationalist. Rodeos have become part of the tradition in the southwest, while contests, concerts, and parades are a common theme across the country.