‘Do Not Smoke While Baby Is in the Room’ and Other Hospital Rules New Moms Had to Follow—In 1968

A happy couple leaves the hospital with their newborn baby in the 1960s.
A happy couple leaves the hospital with their newborn baby in the 1960s.
H. Armstrong Roberts/iStock via Getty Images

In 1968, not only was it acceptable for a new mother to smoke within mere hours of giving birth, but she could even light a cigarette from the comfort of her hospital bed—as long as her newborn baby wasn’t in the room.

Last year, Micala Henson took to Facebook to share an image of the instructions her grandmother had received from the hospital upon giving birth to Henson’s mother in October 1968. The post went viral, and people have continued to comment on the painfully obsolete and medically questionable guidelines well into 2020.

While “Do not smoke while baby is in the room” stands out as perhaps the worst health advice on the list, other rules reveal how much our culture has changed in the last 50 years. Fathers, for example, were strictly prohibited from sitting in the room when their wives were nursing, and visitors could only see babies “on display” at the nursery window during specific (and very restrictive) time slots.

The 'new mother' hospital rules that Micala Henson's grandmother received in 1968.Micala Henson

The nursing schedule itself was exceptionally strict, too. Nurses would bring the baby to its mother four times a day, and the mother could only nurse for a certain number of minutes at a time—five during the first 24 hours, then seven during the second and third days, and finally 10 to 15 minutes for the fourth and fifth days.

“If baby nurses longer,” the instructions state, “It may cause the nipple to become sore.” These days, experts say infants are allowed to feed eight to 12 times a day, or whenever they’re hungry.

There’s also a brief, baffling list of foods nursing mothers should avoid, including chocolate candy, raw apples, cabbage, nuts, strawberries, cherries, onions, and something called “green cocoanut cake.” We can only guess what hospital staff meant by that last item, but some Easter cakes do feature green coconut shavings that look like grass. Today, the CDC recommends that new moms eat a balanced diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables, but avoid seafood (due to the risks of mercury poisoning) and caffeine.

As long as new mothers are eating a variety of healthy foods, they’re probably entitled to a piece of coconut cake or two.

[h/t Bored Panda]

Amazon’s Big Fall Sale Features Deals on Electronics, Kitchen Appliances, and Home Décor

Dash/Keurig
Dash/Keurig

If you're looking for deals on items like Keurigs, BISSELL vacuums, and essential oil diffusers, it's usually pretty slim pickings until the holiday sales roll around. Thankfully, Amazon is starting these deals a little earlier with their Big Fall Sale, where customers can get up to 20 percent off everything from home decor to WFH essentials and kitchen gadgets. Now you won’t have to wait until Black Friday for the deal you need. Make sure to see all the deals that the sale has to offer here and check out our favorites below.

Electronics

Dash/Amazon

- BISSELL Lightweight Upright Vacuum Cleaner $170 (save $60)

- Dash Deluxe Air Fryer $80 (save $20)

- Dash Rapid 6-Egg Cooker $17 (save $3)

- Keurig K-Café Single Coffee Maker $169 (save $30)

- COMFEE Toaster Oven $29 (save $9)

- AmazonBasics 1500W Oscillating Ceramic Heater $31 (save $4)

Home office Essentials

HP/Amazon

- HP Neverstop Laser Printer $250 (save $30)

- HP ScanJet Pro 2500 f1 Flatbed OCR Scanner $274 (save $25)

- HP Printer Paper (500 Sheets) $5 (save $2)

- Mead Composition Books Pack of 5 Ruled Notebooks $11 (save $2)

- Swingline Desktop Hole Punch $7 (save $17)

- Officemate OIC Achieva Side Load Letter Tray $15 (save $7)

- PILOT G2 Premium Rolling Ball Gel Pens 12-Pack $10 (save $3)

Toys and games

Selieve/Amazon

- Selieve Toys Old Children's Walkie Talkies $17 (save $7)

- Yard Games Giant Tumbling Timbers $59 (save $21)

- Duckura Jump Rocket Launchers $11 (save $17)

- EXERCISE N PLAY Automatic Launcher Baseball Bat $14 (save $29)

- Holy Stone HS165 GPS Drones with 2K HD Camera $95 (save $40)

Home Improvement

DEWALT/Amazon

- DEWALT 20V MAX LED Hand Held Work Light $54 (save $65)

- Duck EZ Packing Tape with Dispenser, 6 Rolls $11 (save $6)

- Bissell MultiClean Wet/Dry Garage Auto Vacuum $111 (save $39)

- Full Circle Sinksational Sink Strainer with Stopper $5 (save $2)

Home Décor

NECA/Amazon

- A Christmas Story 20-Inch Leg Lamp Prop Replica by NECA $41 save $5

- SYLVANIA 100 LED Warm White Mini Lights $8 (save 2)

- Yankee Candle Large Jar Candle Vanilla Cupcake $17 (save $12)

- Malden 8-Opening Matted Collage Picture Frame $20 (save $8)

- Lush Decor Blue and Gray Flower Curtains Pair $57 (save $55)

- LEVOIT Essential Oil Diffuser $25 (save $5)

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How Keanu Reeves Was Tricked Into Making The Watcher

Keanu Reeves in 2008.
Keanu Reeves in 2008.
Mike Flokis, Getty Images

Thanks to the success of The Matrix in 1999, which proved his continued box office bankability, Keanu Reeves had his choice of projects when the 2000s came along. It was therefore puzzling to see Reeves in 2000’s The Watcher, a generic crime thriller with Reeves playing a serial killer caught up in a psychological game with an FBI agent played by James Spader. The film was poorly reviewed, made just $29 million, and didn’t seem in sync with Reeves's career. So why did he accept the role?

According to Reeves, it was because he was tricked.

The actor originally agreed to a small role in the film as a favor to friend Joe Charbanic, who played recreational hockey with Reeves and also shot footage of Reeves’s band, Dogstar. He also happened to be The Watcher's director. With Reeves in the cast, it would be easier for producers to obtain financing. Instead, Reeves found himself being prominently featured, with his character, David Allen Griffin, taking up a considerable amount of screen time. (Spader, who played Joel Campbell, received top billing.)

That wasn’t the only issue. In an interview with The Calgary Sun conducted a year after the film’s release, Reeves explained that “a friend” forged his signature on a contract. While that might be cause for legal action, Reeves didn’t see it that way.

“I never found the script interesting, but a friend of mine forged my signature on the agreement,” Reeves said. “I couldn’t prove he did and I didn’t want to get sued, so I had no other choice but to do the film.”

An irritated Reeves refused to do any press promoting the movie, which Universal—the studio that produced the film—allowed if Reeves agreed not to speak openly about his grievances for one year.

Reeves went on to film both Matrix sequels, which were released in 2003. After a string of misses, he scored a hit with 2015’s John Wick. A fourth film in that series is planned.