5 Organizations That Empower Black Communities—and How You Can Help

Attorney Nina Shaw speaks at a 2019 awards ceremony for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
Attorney Nina Shaw speaks at a 2019 awards ceremony for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for NAACP LDF

As people gather across the nation to protest racial injustice and police brutality following the killing of George Floyd by a police officer, you might be wondering what you can do to help promote equality and empower Black communities. One great way is to donate to organizations committed to furthering those goals—from legal defense funds to healthcare initiatives, below are five organizations to consider contributing to (and you can check out more from this list, compiled by Charity Navigator).

1. Black Lives Matter

Founded in 2013 as a response to the acquittal of the man who killed Trayvon Martin, Black Lives Matter is a chapter-based organization that works to end state violence against members of Black communities and bring about social, economic, and political equality.

"We are guided by the fact that all Black lives matter, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status, or location," the organization explains on its website.

Click here to donate.

2. NAACP Legal Defense Fund

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Legal Defense Fund (LDF), established by Thurgood Marshall in 1940, is a law firm that focuses on upholding civil rights and achieving equality through structural change and racial justice.

"Through litigation, advocacy, and public education, LDF seeks structural changes to expand democracy, eliminate disparities, and achieve racial justice in a society that fulfills the promise of equality for all Americans," the LDF mission statement reads.

Click here to donate.

3. Black Women’s Health Imperative

While data on COVID-19 cases is still evolving, the CDC has acknowledged that the current numbers suggest "a disproportionate burden of illness and death among racial and ethnic minority groups." The CDC has also stated that Black, American Indian, and Alaska Native women are "two to three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women." In short, Black women face unique risks when it comes to receiving quality healthcare and life-saving treatment, which makes the Black Women's Health Imperative especially important.

The mission of the Black Women's Health Imperative is "to lead the effort to solve the most pressing health issues that affect Black women and girls in the U.S." In addition to developing programs and supporting policies that help mitigate those issues, they also educate women on preventative measures, healthcare treatment, and more.

Click here to donate.

4. National Association of Black Journalists

The National Association of Black Journalists—the largest coalition of people of color in the journalism industry—seeks equal representation in the media by helping Black journalists progress to managerial positions, providing professional development training, awarding scholarships to students interested in journalism, and more. They also try to effect change in the industry at large by "sensitizing all media to the importance of fairness in the workplace for Black journalists."

Click here to donate.

5. Center for Black Equity

The Center for Black Equity supports Black LGBTQ+ individual by building a network of community-based organizations that, according to their mission statement, promote “health and wellness opportunities, economic empowerment, and equal rights while promoting individual and collective work, responsibility, and self-determination."

Click here to donate.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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San Pedro, California Is Home to the Country’s Only Volunteer-Run Post Office

A vintage postcard of San Pedro, California.
A vintage postcard of San Pedro, California.
Boston Public Library Tichnor Brothers, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

There are more than 30,000 post offices in the United States, but only one of them is staffed entirely by volunteers. As Fast Company reports, the nonprofit-run Assistance League Post Office has been serving customers in San Pedro, California, since 1964.

The Assistance League Post Office is one of many contract postal units around the country. Contract postal units are run privately instead of publicly, usually by a business. The post office in San Pedro is unique in that it's operated by a nonprofit organization.

More than 50 years ago, the San Pedro chapter of the Assistance League opened the post office to service its growing community, which includes the Port of Los Angeles. The location only sold stamps for decades, then expanded into a full-service post office in 1990. In addition to running the local postal service, the Assistance League of San Pedro provides low-income residents with orthodontia care, glasses, sexual assault survivor kits, and new school clothes—all resources that revenue from the post office helps pay for.

To make its charitable mission possible, the post office relies on volunteers. Post office chairman Gayle Merrick runs a staff of 17 volunteers—all retired women between the ages of 65 and 87. Their backgrounds range from medicine to education, and they commit to giving three to four days of their time to the post office each month. Many people who volunteer at the Assistance League Post Office stick around for a while; the longest-serving volunteer worked there for a quarter of a century.

The San Pedro post office closed to the public in the spring due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and its customers and volunteers are still waiting for it to return. Merrick tells Fast Company that she hopes to reopen by October 1, in time to help process local mail-in ballots for the 2020 election.

[h/t Fast Company]