If the tiny house trend isn’t your thing, you can always go in the opposite direction. After 10 years of construction and careful planning, the Los Angeles mega-mansion known as “The One” is finally on the market. But even though it’s listed for $295 million, it’s not quite move-in ready.

A private bowling alley can be yours.Courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The 105,000-square-foot home—said to be twice as large as the White House—is the largest in Los Angeles, and definitely the most imposing in the tony Bel-Air district. It comes pre-furnished, with an extensive art collection in place, multiple pools, a tennis court, bowling alley, and nightclub. The home's 21 bedrooms and 49 bathrooms mean that no one will lack a place to crash (or pee). The piece de resistance might be the 5000-square-foot bedroom—which also has its own pool. Six elevators can transport occupants from one luxurious area to another. To ward off peasants, a moat surrounds the entire property.

Multiple swimming pools can be found on the property.Courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The list price would be more than the $165 million Jeff Bezos paid for his Beverly Hills estate in 2020, making him look like a pauper in comparison.

If this sounds like intentional decadence, that’s because it is. The home is the brainchild of developer Nile Niami, who began building on the $28 million parcel of land in 2012 with the idea of creating the most ostentatious home in Los Angeles with a list price of $500 million. (The objective may have been a bit beyond Niami’s reach, as he reportedly defaulted on $165 million in loans and other debt: The property is now in receivership.)

"The One" has style to spare.Courtesy of TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

Real estate offices Aaron Kirman Group at Compass and Williams & Williams at the Beverly Hills Estates are jointly listing the property, which will go up for auction via Concierge Auctions from February 7 to February 10. Eager buyers can, of course, purchase it for the list price before then, but there is one slight hiccup. The custom home has never been occupied and still needs a certificate of occupancy verifying safety and code compliance before anyone can move in.

[h/t TopTenRealEstateDeals.com]