16 Fun Facts About Veronica Mars

The CW
The CW

Veronica Mars was a smart, funny, sometimes very real, teen noir drama that surprised critics and viewers with its unflinching look at how classes—both the high school kind and the kind that separate us all financially—can make or break who we are. Broadcast on UPN and The CW from 2004 to 2007, a record-breaking Kickstarter campaign brought the series back as a crowdfunded movie in 2014. Here are some things you might not know about the series that launched Kristen Bell's career, and aired its series finale 10 years ago, on May 22, 2007.

1. VERONICA WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A GUY.

Series creator Rob Thomas (no, not the Matchbox Twenty guy) had written young adult books before turning to television. The idea for the series originated as the idea for a book, which would have featured a male protagonist.

2. APPROXIMATELY 100 ACTRESSES READ FOR THE ROLE OF VERONICA.

Kristen Bell was the first of the estimated 100 actors to audition for the lead. "Kristen was the very first actress I saw and my mind was blown," Thomas recalled at PaleyFest2014. As he auditioned the next 99 people for the part, "I kept thinking, 'Was that first girl as brilliant as I thought she was?'"

3. JASON DOHRING AUDITIONED FOR DUNCAN, AND TEDDY DUNN AUDITIONED FOR LOGAN.

Dohring of course ended up playing Logan, and Dunn played Duncan Kane. Logan was initially only supposed to be a guest star in the first episode.

4. THE SERIES WAS MOSTLY SHOT IN SAN DIEGO.

The fictitious Neptune High was in fact Oceanside High School. San Diego State University, and University of California-San Diego teamed up to portray Hearst College. The Tijuana border was actually in the Qualcomm Stadium parking lot, and the Balboa Park courtyard was reimagined as Cuba.

5. THE ACTOR PLAYING WALLACE WAS TIRED OF WALLACE DOING FAVORS FOR VERONICA.

Percy Daggs III asked Thomas early on in season one if Wallace could be made to be more funny and lighthearted, instead of just someone who gets files for Veronica. Eventually, his frustration came out of Wallace’s mouth on the show. Daggs also wanted to broach Wallace’s attraction to Veronica, but UPN didn’t want to get into that.

6. HARRY HAMLIN COULD HAVE RUINED THOMAS’S PLAN FOR THE BIG SEASON ONE MYSTERY.

Thomas always knew he wanted Logan’s father, Aaron (played by Hamlin), to be Lily’s killer. Hamlin had been scheduled to shoot a movie in Australia when the season one finale, “Leave it to Beaver,” was going to be filmed. Had he taken the movie role, Thomas would have had to change the ending. Instead, Hamlin decided to stick around. If it was leaked before air that Aaron was the killer, Tommy Dunn said they would have changed it to Duncan.

7. JAMES JORDAN PLAYED TWO ENTIRELY DIFFERENT CHARACTERS.

In season two, James Jordan had a three-episode arc playing Thomas “Lucky” Dohanic. In season three he was brought back as Tim Foyle, an entirely different character.

8. JOSS WHEDON MADE A CAMEO.

The Buffy the Vampire Slayer showrunner wrote on his blog that he had never been prouder for Buffy to be compared to any other show than he was when it was compared to Veronica Mars. The glowing review led Thomas to invite Whedon to play Car Rental Guy during the series' second season. Thomas also invited fan Stephen King to cameo as a “crazy sociology professor,” but the bestselling author had to decline. "We had a very kind note from him," said Thomas. "He said, 'I'm actually booked at that time, but I love your show. Keep me in mind for other things.'"

9. LOGAN AND DUNCAN WERE COLOR COORDINATED TO AVOID CONFUSION.

Duncan was purposely dressed in blues, and Logan in earth tones, as mandated by the network (whose executives were concerned that the actors looked too much alike).

10. THOMAS HAD NO INTENTION OF LOGAN AND VERONICA GETTING TOGETHER.

When Thomas and the writers watched dailies, they couldn’t ignore Bell and Dohring’s on-screen chemistry. Thomas informed the two after six episodes that they were eventually going to get together.

11. BEAVER WAS PLANNED AS SEASON TWO'S KILLER DURING SEASON ONE.

Poor Dick Casablancas’s brother’s motivation was plotted since he was first introduced during the show's first season.

12. "PIZ" WAS A NOD TO ONE OF THE SHOW'S DIRECTORS.

Stosh “Piz” Piznarski (Chris Lowell) was named after Mark Piznarski, who directed the show's pilot episode. Thomas described Stosh as being "very much in the Lloyd Dobler mold.” Lowell was surprised when he was asked to appear in the movie years later, as he didn't think his character was very well liked.

13. PAUL RUDD WAS ALMOST A RECURRING CHARACTER.

Paul Rudd was originally considered for the unscrupulous P.I. Vinnie Van Lowe, though that role eventually (and memorably) went to Ken Marino. Instead, Rudd appeared in a single episode (season three's “Debasement Tapes”) as a washed-up rock star named Desmond Fellows.

14. THOMAS ALMOST QUIT TO WRITE FOR ANOTHER SHOW.

After season two, Thomas was offered a writing job on Friday Night Lights. He opted to stick around and see his creation through for one more year.

15. A FOURTH SEASON WOULD HAVE SEEN VERONICA AS AN FBI AGENT.

Thomas made a 12-minute video showing both The CW and other networks what they would be getting if they brought Veronica Mars back for a fourth season in 2007. After skipping a few years past the events of the series finale, “The Bitch is Back,” Mars would have been a rookie agent with the FBI. Walton Goggins played her boss. No network bought it.

16. THOMAS RAISED $2 MILLION FOR THE MOVIE IN LESS THAN 11 HOURS.

When Thomas launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund a Veronica Mars movie in 2013, his goal was to raise $2 million in 30 days. Within hours, he had surpassed that amount. By the end of the month, the campaign had raised a total of $5,702,153 from 91,585 backers, making it one of the most successful campaigns in the crowdfunding site's history. The movie was released in 2014.

12 Good Ol' Facts About The Dukes of Hazzard

Getty Images
Getty Images

When The Dukes of Hazzard premiered on January 26, 1979, it was intended to be a temporary patch in CBS’s primetime schedule until The Incredible Hulk returned. Only nine episodes were ordered, and few executives at the network had any expectation that the series—about two amiable brothers at odds with the corrupt law enforcement of Hazzard County—would become both a ratings powerhouse and a merchandising bonanza. Check out some of these lesser-known facts about the Duke boys, their extended family, and the gravity-defying General Lee.

1. CBS's chairman hated The Dukes of Hazzard.

CBS chairman William Paley never quite bought into the idea of spinning his opinion to match the company line. Having built CBS from a radio station to one of the “Big Three” television networks, he had harvested talent as diverse as Norman Lear and Lucille Ball, a marked contrast to the Southern-fried humor of The Dukes of Hazzard. In his 80s when it became a top 10 series and seeing no reason to censor himself, Paley repeatedly and publicly described the show as “lousy.”

2. The Dukes of Hazzard's General Lee got 35,000 fan letters a month.


Getty Images

While John Schneider and Tom Wopat were the ostensible stars of the show, both the actors and the show's producers quickly found out that the main attraction was the 1969 Dodge Charger—dubbed the General Lee—that trafficked brothers Bo and Luke Duke from one caper to another. Of the 60,000 letters the series was receiving every month in 1981, 35,000 wanted more information on or pictures of the car.

3. Dennis Quaid wanted to be The Dukes of Hazzard's Luke Duke—on one condition.

When the show began casting in 1978, producers threw out a wide net searching for the leads. Dennis Quaid was among those interested in the role of Luke Duke—which eventually went to Wopat—but he had a condition: he would only agree to the show if his then-wife, P.J. Soles, was cast at the Dukes’ cousin, Daisy. Soles wasn’t a proper fit for the supporting part, which put Quaid off; Catherine Bach was eventually cast as Daisy.

4. John Schneider pretended to be a redneck for his Dukes of Hazzard audition.

New York native Schneider was only 18 years old when he went in to read for the role of Bo Duke. The problem: producers wanted someone 24 to 30 years old. Schneider lied about his age and passed himself off as a Southern archetype, strutting in wearing a cowboy hat, drinking a beer, and spitting tobacco. He also told them he could do stunt driving. It was a good enough performance to land him the show.

5. The Dukes of Hazzard co-stars John Schneider and Tom Wopat met while taking a poop.

After Schneider was cast, the show needed to locate an actor who could complement Bo. Stage actor Wopat was flown in for a screen test; Schneider happened to be in the bathroom when Wopat walked in after him. The two began talking about music—Schneider had seen a guitar under the stall door—and found they had an easy camaraderie. After flushing, the two did a scene. Wopat was hired immediately.

6. Daisy's Dukes needed a tweak on The Dukes of Hazzard.

Bach’s omnipresent jean shorts were such a hit that any kind of cutoffs quickly became known as “Daisy Dukes,” after her character. But they were so skimpy that the network was concerned censors wouldn’t allow them. A negotiation began, and it was eventually decided that Bach would wear some extremely sheer pantyhose to make sure there were no clothing malfunctions.

7. Nancy Reagan was fan of The Dukes of Hazzard's Daisy.

Shirley Moore, Bach’s former grade school teacher, went on to work in the White House. After Bach sent her a poster, she was surprised to hear back that then-First Lady Nancy Reagan was enamored with it. “I’m the envy of the White House and I’m having your poster framed,” Moore wrote in a letter. “Mrs. Reagan saw the picture and fell in love with it.” Bach sent more posters, which presumably became part of the decor during the Reagan administration.

8. The Dukes of Hazzard's stars had some very bizarre contract demands.

Wopat and Schneider famously walked off the series in 1982 after demanding a cut of the show’s massive merchandising revenue—which was, by one estimate, more than $190 million in 1981 alone. They were replaced with Byron Cherry and Christopher Mayer, “cousins” of the Duke boys, who were reviled by fans for being scabs. The two leads eventually came back, but it wasn’t the only time Warner Bros. had to deal with irate actors. James Best, who portrayed crooked sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane, refused to film five episodes because he had no private dressing room in which to change his clothes; the production just hosed him down when he got dirty. Ben Jones, who played “Cooter” the mechanic, briefly left because he wanted his character to sport a beard and producers preferred he be clean-shaven.

9. A miniature car was used for some stunts in The Dukes of Hazzard.

As established, the General Lee was a primary attraction for viewers of the series. For years, the show wrecked dozens of Chargers by jumping, crashing, and otherwise abusing them, which created some terrific footage. For its seventh and final season in 1985, the show turned to a miniature effects team in an effort to save on production costs: it was cheaper to mangle a Hot Wheels-sized model than the real thing. “It was a source of embarrassment to all of us on the show,” Wopat told E!.

10. The Dukes of Hazzard's famous "hood slide" was an accident.

A staple—and, eventually, cliché—of action films everywhere, the slide over the hood was popularized by Tom Wopat. While it may have been tempting to take credit, Wopat said it was unintentional and that the first time he tried clearing the hood, the car’s antenna wound up injuring him.

11. The Dukes of Hazzard cartoon went international.


YouTube

Warner Bros. capitalized on the show’s phenomenal popularity with an animated series, The Dukes, which was produced by Hanna-Barbera and aired in 1983. Taking advantage of the form, the Duke boys traveled internationally, racing Boss Hogg through Greece or Hong Kong. Perhaps owing to the fact that the live-action series was already considered enough of a cartoon, the animated series only lasted 20 episodes.

12. In 2015, Warner Bros. banned the Confederate flag from The Dukes of Hazzard merchandising.

At the time the series originally aired, little was made of the General Lee sporting a Confederate flag on its hood. In 2015, after then-South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley spoke out against the depiction of the flag in popular culture, Warner Bros. elected to stop licensing products with the original roof. The company announced that all future Dukes merchandise would drop the design element. Schneider disagreed with the decision, telling The Hollywood Reporter, “Is the flag used as such in other applications? Yes, but certainly not on the Dukes ... Labeling anyone who has the flag a ‘racist’ seems unfair to those who are clearly ‘never meanin’ no harm.'”

8 Surprising Facts About Paul Newman

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

With roles as varied as pool shark “Fast” Eddie Felson in 1961’s The Hustler (and 1986's The Color of Money) and alcoholic lawyer Frank Galvin in 1982’s The Verdict, Paul Newman never conformed to type. The versatile actor spent decades as a movie star, auto racer, and part-time salad dressing pitchman. In honor of what would have been Newman’s 95th birthday on January 26, 2020, take a look at some lesser-known details of the performer’s life and career.

1. Paul Newman originally wanted to be a football player.

Born in Cleveland and raised in Shaker Heights, Ohio, Paul Newman was the offspring of Arthur, a sporting goods store owner, and Teresa, whose love of theater eventually proved contagious. But Newman originally had his sights set on a sports career. He played football in high school and college before enlisting in the U.S. Navy Air Corps, where he served as a radio operator (as he was ineligible to be a pilot due to being colorblind).

When Newman returned home in 1946, he attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio on a football scholarship. After getting arrested for fighting and being kicked off the team, Newman decided to shift his major to theater. He eventually wound up in summer stock and then the Yale School of Drama before heading off to be a full-time actor in New York.

2. Paul Newman thought his first film was the worst movie ever made.

After stints on stage and in television, including roles in Playhouse 90, Newman was offered the starring role in 1954’s The Silver Chalice, about a Greek slave who crafts the cup used during the Last Supper. While the $1000 weekly salary was welcome, the film was not. Newman later asked friends to sit through it while drubbing it as the worst film ever made. He had better luck two years later when he played boxer Rocky Graziano in Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956). In 1958, Newman earned his first of 10 Academy Award nominations for Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

3. Paul Newman was often mistaken for Marlon Brando.

Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward standing outdoors, circa 1962
Paul Newman and wife Joanne Woodward, circa 1962.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Early in their respective careers, Newman was regularly approached by people who thought he was Marlon Brando. Rather than correct them, he would oblige their request for an autograph by signing, “Best Wishes, Marlon Brando.”

4. Paul Newman frequently enjoyed faking his own death.

Newman, who was described by most who knew him as an affable man, had a mischievous streak that often manifested in practical jokes on his directors. A frequent target was George Roy Hill, who directed Newman in 1969’s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1973’s The Sting, and 1977’s Slap Shot. Newman cut Hill’s desk and car in half during filming of the first two films. While making Slap Shot, he crawled behind the wheel of a wrecked car and pretended he had been in an accident, much to Hill’s horror.

While making 1960’s Exodus, Newman pranked director Otto Preminger by tossing a dummy off a building knowing Preminger would think it was him: Preminger collapsed in shock. He repeated the joke during shooting of 1973’s The MacKintosh Man, tossing another dummy off a 60-foot building in front of director John Huston.

5. A movie introduced Paul Newman to racing.

It was starring in the 1969 racing film Winning that led Newman down a path of competitive racing in his private life. In 1972, Newman started driving on an amateur level before winning his first professional race in 1982. At age 70, he was part of the winning team in the 1995 Daytona 24-Hours sports car endurance race and continued to drive through 2005. The hobby was one of the few things that could get Newman, who was notoriously press-shy, to open up to media. “I’ll always talk about racing because the people are interesting and fun, the sport is a lot more exciting than anything else I do, and nobody cares that I’m an actor,” Newman said. “I wish I could spend all my time at the racetrack.”

6. Richard Nixon considered Paul Newman an enemy.

Actor Paul Newman is pictured in Venice, Italy in 1963
Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty Images

President Richard Nixon, who was no stranger to controversy, liked to keep tabs on people he considered volatile and in opposition to his politics. While that normally included political figures, his “enemies list” also included Newman. The actor earned the honor by supporting 1968 presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey and being an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War. Oddly, Newman and Nixon had some personal history: Both men shared use of a Jaguar on loan from an automobile dealer. When Newman learned that Nixon was driving the car during part of the week, he left a note saying Nixon should find no trouble operating a car with a “tricky clutch,” a nod to Nixon’s “Tricky Dick” nickname. When Nixon gathered his list of rivals in 1971, Newman’s name was on it. The actor later got a copy and had it framed.

7. Martha Stewart helped put Paul Newman’s salad dressing on the map.

Today it's not uncommon for major actors to lend their images to food and alcoholic beverages. In the early 1980s, it was unusual, though Newman wasn’t looking to make history—only salad dressing. The actor enjoyed mixing an oil and vinegar blend and giving it out to friends and family around the holidays. With friend A.E. Hotchner, Newman bottled a batch and dispensed it over the 1980 Christmas season. Martha Stewart, who was then a caterer, was living in Newman's neighborhood at the time and reported a blind taste test was in favor of the dressing. Newman agreed to put his face on the bottle and call it Newman’s Own. The dressing and the foods to come—including spaghetti sauce—generated profits that Newman donated entirely to charity. As of 2015, the company has delivered an estimated $430 million to charitable causes.

8. Paul Newman once offered part of his salary to a co-star.

While making the 1998 film Twilight with Gene Hackman and Susan Sarandon, Newman was surprised to discover that both he and Hackman were making considerably more than Sarandon, despite all three receiving equal billing. Sarandon told the BBC in 2018 that Newman then offered to give up a portion of his salary to make things equitable.

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