Before movie makers relied on the magic of CGI, they had to use more creative methods to create scenes. Professional miniaturists were called in to create impossibly detailed sets that would put even the most elaborate dollhouses to shame. The hyperrealistic sets were often in one-twelfth scale, making each component remarkably small. And they didn't skimp on the details. The staged areas needed to be as convincing as possible, so that the viewers did not notice they weren't looking at a full-size room, meaning they needed to incorporate as many nuances as possible like dirty windows, layers of dust, and graffitied walls. 

You can see some of these incredible miniatures at the Musée Miniature et Cinéma in Lyon, France. The museum has more than 100 sets that span over two floors of the building. Among these is the entire collection of accomplished miniaturist Dan Ohlmann, a former cabinetmaker who has been making tiny sets for over 20 years. Visitors can peek inside these tiny wonders and fully take in the amount of detail and effort themselves. 

"More than mere technical achievements, these creations are mirages of their own kind. Their outstanding realism revives one’s memories and exhales a distinct sense of nostalgia," their website says

Alan Wolfson, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Michel Perez, MMC LYON

Dan Ohlmann, MMC LYON

Laurie Courbier, MMC LYON

Ronan Jim Sevellec, MMC LYON

[h/t: Web Urbanist]All images courtesy of MMC LYON.