12 Not-So-Ridiculous Facts About Perfect Strangers

ABC
ABC

If Bronson Pinchot was ever afraid he might be typecast for his over-the-top foreign accent in 1984’s Beverly Hills Cop, eight seasons of his over-the-top foreign accent on ABC’s Perfect Strangers confirmed it. Premiering in 1986, the buddy show featured Pinchot’s sheep-herding Balki Bartokomous clashing with modern Chicago and cousin-slash-roommate Larry Appleton (Mark Linn-Baker) in a quest to be less ridiculous. Check out the details on recasting, spin-offs, and how they won over Lucille Ball. 

1. THE SHOW WAS INSPIRED BY THE 1984 OLYMPICS.

Television producers Thomas Miller, Robert Boyett, and Dale McRaven all agreed that watching international athletes experience American life while in Los Angeles for the 1984 Summer Olympics got them thinking about exploring that kind of culture shock in a series. While Pinchot was their first choice for European immigrant Balki, he had already committed to another show, Sara, for NBC. When that show was canceled, he agreed to do Perfect Strangers.

2. TOM CRUISE WARNED PINCHOT NOT TO DO TV.

Before landing Perfect Strangers, Pinchot had a supporting role in 1983’s Risky Business starring Tom Cruise. While on the set, Pinchot told US Magazine that Cruise picked up on the fact he was low on funds. Cruise offered to lend him money and cautioned him against ever doing television. “Whatever you do, don’t do it,” Cruise allegedly told him. Pinchot explained that, as he was not Tom Cruise, he wasn't in a position to turn down anything.

3. LOUIE ANDERSON WAS ORIGINALLY CAST AS LARRY.

In a slightly more cynical version of the pilot, comedian Louie Anderson appeared as Cousin Louie opposite Pinchot’s Balki. Producers thought the chemistry was missing, so Anderson was let go; of the several actors to audition after his departure, everyone agreed Pinchot had the best dynamic playing against fellow Yale graduate Mark Linn-Baker.

4. THE SHOW WAS ON THE AIR THREE WEEKS AFTER THE FIRST SCENE WAS SHOT.

While ABC loved the premise and script for Perfect Strangers, executives thought the show might get lost in the wave of new shows premiering in the fall of 1986. Instead, they proposed producers quickly assemble six episodes to debut in winter 1986 as a mid-season replacement. In order to do this, episodes were taped in record time, with one show airing just one week after it had first been rehearsed.

5. PINCHOT AND LINN-BAKER NEARLY KNOCKED EACH OTHER OUT.

ABC

In a network-authorized, pre-Internet newsletter circulated among fans of the series, author Paula Wilshe related a story of a 1988 taping that resulted in a bloody mess. For a scene where Larry is teaching Balki how to be more assertive, Pinchot grabbed his co-star and shook him so violently their heads collided. Both men went down: Pinchot damaged a tooth on Linn-Baker’s forehead, requiring a root canal, while Linn-Baker needed stitches. 

6. MYPOS WAS CREATED TO AVOID OFFENDING ANYONE.

After some discussion over making Balki a character of Greek descent, producers decided that he would hail from the fictitious country of Mypos. According to Pinchot, this was done because the bizarre customs mentioned in the show might prove offensive to a real territory.

7. LUCILLE BALL WAS A FAN.

Both Pinchot and Linn-Baker perceived Perfect Strangers as a kind of spiritual cousin of I Love Lucy and The Honeymooners, with physical, character-driven humor that was in contrast to the topical, “issue”-oriented sitcoms of the 1980s. When the show returned for a second season in August 1986, Lucille Ball told press that they were both “just great” and that “I love those two guys.” Pinchot was impressed. “It’s like being a watercolorist and having Renoir say, ‘Interesting, good work,’” he said.

8. BALKI WAS NAMED AFTER PINCHOT’S SISTER’S DOG.

Sort of. In 1986, Pinchot told TV Guide that "Balki" was short for “balcony,” which is what his family considered naming his sister’s dog when they were kids. They ultimately named the pet something else, but Balki stuck: Pinchot remembered it when producers were trying to decide what to name his character.

9. CREDIT (OR BLAME) THE SHOW FOR FAMILY MATTERS.

It’s not often that a spin-off exceeds the popularity of the original, but ABC’s Family Matters proved otherwise. The elevator operator in the duo’s apartment building was Harriette Winslow (Jo Marie Payton), who made regular appearances in the third and fourth seasons along with her police officer husband, Carl (Reginald VelJohnson). The characters migrated to their own series in fall 1989, making a star of Jaleel White’s Urkel. (Pinchot and Linn-Baker filmed a cameo for the Family Matters pilot, but it never aired.)

10. THE SHOW HELPED ANCHOR ABC’S TGIF DYNASTY.

TGIF was ABC’s very clever, very effective marketing campaign that turned a block of its Friday night sitcoms into one marathon viewing session. To promote the idea, the cast of the various shows would shoot promotional material, usually at the very end of a long workday. It was unpaid work, and many casts (including Family Matters) felt it was fatiguing, but Pinchot and Linn-Baker were happy to do it because they were close enough friends to make it fun. “We would do hours, hundreds and hundreds, of those interstitials, and nobody … could have talked us up and said, ‘This is why this is good for you,’” Pinchot told Entertainment Weekly in 2015. “We did it for each other.”

11. THE ENTIRE CAST WAS PART OF THE RAPTURE.

In an exceptionally bizarre reference, the rapture-like disappearance of part of the world’s population in HBO’s The Leftovers apparently included the entire cast of Perfect Strangers. It’s a throwaway line, but it also cost Mark Linn-Baker an acting gig: After he auditioned for a role on the show, producers agreed they couldn’t cast him since “their” version of Linn-Baker had gone on to his great reward.

12. THE STUDIO AUDIENCE WOULD USUALLY ASK THEM TO DANCE.

BasementRejects

After a studio taping, Linn-Baker and Pinchot would field audience questions. In many cases, someone would ask them to do the Dance of Joy, Balki’s signature piece of performance art. Owing to relief the long shoot was over, or just expressing gratitude the show was a hit, they’d usually do it.

This Gorgeous Vintage Edition of Clue Sets the Perfect Mood for a Murder Mystery

WS Game Company
WS Game Company

Everyone should have a few good board games lying around the house for official game nights with family and friends and to kill some time on the occasional rainy day. But if your collection leaves a lot to be desired, you can class-up your selection with this great deal on the Vintage Bookshelf Edition of Clue for $40.

A brief history of Clue

'Clue' Vintage Bookshelf Edition.
WS Game Company.

Originally titled Murder!, Clue was created by a musician named Anthony Pratt in Birmingham, England, in 1943, and he filed a patent for it in 1944. He sold the game to Waddington's in the UK a few years later, and they changed the name to Cluedo in 1949 (that name was a mix between the words clue and Ludo, which was a 19th-century game.) That same year, the game was licensed to Parker Brothers in the United States, where it was published as Clue. Since then, there have been numerous special editions and spinoffs of the original game, not to mention books and a television series based on it. Most notably, though, was the cult classic 1985 film Clue, which featured Eileen Brennan, Tim Curry, Madeline Kahn, Christopher Lloyd, Michael McKean, Martin Mull, and Lesley Ann Warren.

As you probably know, every game of Clue begins with the revelation of a murder. The object of the game is to be the first person to deduce who did it, with what weapon, and where. To achieve that end, each player assumes the role of one of the suspects and moves strategically around the board collecting clues.

With its emphasis on logic and critical thinking—in addition to some old-fashioned luck—Clue is a masterpiece that has stood the test of time and evolved with each decade, with special versions of the game hitting shelves recently based on The Office, Rick and Morty, and Star Wars.

Clue Vintage Bookshelf Edition

'Clue' Vintage Library Edition.
WS Game Company

The Vintage Bookshelf Edition of Clue is the work of the WS Game Company, a licensee of Hasbro, and all the design elements are inspired by the aesthetic of the 1949 original. The game features a vintage-looking game board, cards, wood movers, die-cast weapons, six pencils, an ivory-colored die, an envelope, and a pad of “detective notes.” And, of course, everything folds up and stores inside a beautiful cloth-bound book box that you can store right on the shelf in your living room.

Clue Vintage Bookshelf Edition is a limited-release item, and right now you can get it for $40.

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16 Priceless Treasures We've Lost Forever

jeanyfan, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
jeanyfan, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Steven Spielberg is known for crafting such masterpieces as Jaws, E.T., Schindler's List, and Jurassic Park. With such a long and acclaimed film career, it probably wouldn't surprise anyone to learn that Spielberg got his start behind the camera at just 17 years old when (with the help of his friends and his high school marching band) he directed his first feature-length film, Firelight.

What's that? You've never seen Firelight? Well, you're certainly not alone; sadly, just under four minutes of the original footage remains. After screening Firelight for around 500 people, the young director sent a few of the film reels off to a producer for review. When the budding director later went back to retrieve his film, he discovered that the producer had been fired—and his movie had vanished.

Firelight is just one example of the many priceless items that have disappeared from history. On this episode of The List Show, we're rediscovering all sort of treasures—from writing by Ernest Hemingway to natural landmarks—that have been lost to time (or circumstance). You can watch the full episode below.

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