How Lizzie Borden Spent Her Life After Being Acquitted

A photograph of Lizzie Borden in 1890.
A photograph of Lizzie Borden in 1890.
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Everyone knows that Lizzie Borden took an axe and gave her mother 40 whacks—and when she saw what she had done, she gave her father 41.

That old jump rope rhyme has a few factual errors, actually: Abby Borden was Lizzie’s stepmother, not her mother, and she was on the receiving end of 18 or 19 blows, while her father received about 11. And, not least of all, Lizzie was acquitted of the horrific murders in Fall River, Massachusetts.

After winning the trial of the century, in which a jury of 12 heavily mustachioed men (picture below) deliberated for 90 minutes, Borden chose to stay in Fall River. She quickly learned that though she had been acquitted in a court of law, not everyone was willing to let her off the hook.


Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

She bought a new house, which she deemed “Maplecroft,” in one of the nicest neighborhoods in town. And, perhaps to fit into her swanky new digs, she started going by “Lizbeth” instead of Lizzie. Two years after the murder, she and her sister Emma even spent more than $2000 to purchase a 10-foot-tall blue granite monument for their famously deceased relatives.

But if Borden thought she was going to get a fresh start in town, she was dead wrong. All of her friends abandoned her. People refused to sit near her at church. And children, probably daring each other to tempt the murderess, would ring her doorbell in the middle of the night and pelt her house with gravel and eggs.

It’s not surprising that the court of public opinion turned against Borden. Had the citizens of Fall River not already made their minds up for themselves, their opinions may have been swayed when Judge Josiah Blaisdell pronounced her “probably guilty” at her preliminary hearing.

In 1905, even her sister turned on her. Lizzie often traveled to Boston and New York to go to the theater and had developed a relationship with actress Nance O’Neil. Emma disapproved, and a party Lizzie threw for O’Neil at Maplecroft ended up being the last straw. Emma moved out of the house, and though she refused to discuss the matter, she told the Boston Sunday Herald that “I did not go until conditions became absolutely unbearable.” The sisters remained estranged for the rest of their lives.

Lizzie may have gotten one final dig in at the residents of Fall River who had condemned her. After a year of illness, Lizzie died on June 1, 1927—and no one was invited to her burial.

This story has been updated for 2019.

Drunken Thieves Tried Stealing Stones From Notre-Dame

Notre-Dame.
Notre-Dame.
Athanasio Gioumpasis, Getty Images

With Paris, France, joining a long list of locales shutting down due to coronavirus, two thieves decided the time was right to attempt a clumsy heist—stealing stones from the Notre-Dame cathedral.

The crime occurred last Tuesday, March 17, and appeared from the start to be ill-conceived. The two intruders entered the cathedral and were immediately spotted by guards, who phoned police. When authorities found them, the trespassers were apparently drunk and attempting to hide under a tarpaulin with a collection of stones they had taken from the premises. Both men were arrested.

It’s believed the offenders intended to sell the material for a profit. Stones from the property sometimes come up for sale on the black market, though most are fake.

The crime comes as Paris is not only dealing with the coronavirus pandemic but a massive effort to restore Notre-Dame after the cathedral was ravaged by a fire in 2019. That work has come to a halt in the wake of the health crisis, though would-be looters should take note that guards still patrol the property.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

Crepe and Punishment: Police in Surrey, England Are Using Pancakes to Share Wanted Posters

Svetlana Monyakova, iStock via Getty Images
Svetlana Monyakova, iStock via Getty Images

It can be hard to get people to care about local crime, so the police department of Surrey, England, recently took advantage of something everyone has an opinion on: breakfast. As Sky News reports, the Surrey Police have updated their social media with wanted posters of suspects superimposed onto pancakes.

The functional flapjacks were shared on Pancake Day, or Shrove Tuesday, February 25. They're in the style of the pancake art that's popular on social media, but instead of cute cartoon characters, they depict faces of people wanted by the authorities.

"We’ve asked Crepe Artiste Philippe de Pan to help us locate some of our most wanted through the medium of pancake art," the Surrey police tweeted on Pancake Day. In a later tweet, they confess that Philippe de Pan isn't a real person and the appetizing wanted posters were rendered digitally.

With one picture, the department tweeted, "If you can help us crepe up on him, give us a call." They also shared real photos of the suspects for clarity, saying: "If you are struggling a bit with the 'crepe' artwork, maybe this 'batter' image will help!"

The stunt was pulled as a joke, but it could be an effective way to get people's attention. Most Twitter users scroll through their feeds quickly, but if they see a fluffy stack of pancakes, they maple the break, fast.

[h/t Sky News]

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