Baby Sloths' Giant Poops Defy Physics/All Decency

There’s one thing that almost never makes it into viral videos (even our own) of adorable sloths, and that’s pooping. Probably because sloths generally go only once a week (and sometimes only once a month), but also because it's mildly scarring. It’s like watching an animal ever so slowly give birth—but to a chunky, blackened turd.

On a recent visit to the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, The Washington Post not only asked hard-hitting questions on sloth poop mechanics, as befitting such a storied journalistic institution, but also captured rare video of a baby sloth doing his business.

The adorable, 5-month-old Valentino is a Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth, and he only urinates and defecates once a week, in what an aviary employee described as an opening of the floodgates. It all comes out in one big piece, like a hardy poop snake.

A healthy sloth turd can be up to a third of the animal’s body weight, and when it happens, you can visibly see their stomach shrinking. When Valentino is done, you’ll get a somewhat horrifying glimpse of the gaping cavern that is his anus.

In the wild, three-toed sloths climb down from the canopy just to poop, doing a little “poo dance” to make a little latrine. It’s a risky activity, given how slow the animals are. An estimated half of sloth fatalities occur on the ground (and thus, half of sloth fatalities were sloths who really had to go).

Why some sloths undergo such a production every time they need to poop is a scientific mystery, since they could easily just let loose with their giant turds from the canopy. (Grab your hat, because two-toed sloths like Valentino often let loose from above rather than making the trek to the forest floor.) One hypothesis alleges that it’s part of a symbiotic relationship between the sloths, moths, and algae, though it’s far from universally accepted. It may also relate to sloth courtship, signaling to other available sloths through pheromones. Either way, it’s an elaborate production.

[h/t The Washington Post]

Header image by RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/GettyImages

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Do Dogs Get Headaches?

Even without raging benders, dogs might still get headaches.
Even without raging benders, dogs might still get headaches.
damedeeso/iStock via Getty Images

Like babies, dogs can be hard to read in the medical ailment department. Are they listless because they’re tired, or because they’re sick? What’s behind their whining? And can they suffer that most human of debilitating conditions, the headache?

Gizmodo polled several veterinarians and animal behavior specialists to find out, and the answer seems to be a resounding yes.

Although a dog can’t express discomfort in a specific way, particularly if it doesn’t involve limping, animal experts know that canines that have diagnosed brain tumors or encephalitis can also be observed to have a high heart rate, a sign of physical pain. According to Tim Bentley, an associate professor of veterinary neurology and neurosurgery at Purdue Veterinary Medicine, administering painkillers will bring a dog’s heart rate down. If signs of physical distress also decrease, a headache was likely involved.

Unfortunately, not all dogs may offer overt signals they’re feeling some brain pain. According to Adam Boyko, an associate professor of biomedical sciences at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, dogs instinctively try to mask pain to avoid showing weakness.

Ultimately, dogs have many of the same central neural pathways as humans, which can likely go awry in some of the same ways. But the kind of persistent headaches owing to head colds or hangovers are probably rare in dogs. And while it goes without saying, they definitely don't need any of your Advil.

[h/t Gizmodo]