12 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do With Your Streaming Devices

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iStock

With the emergence of streaming devices, getting your favorite content from the internet to your TV is getting easier every day. Although Roku, Chromecast, Amazon Fire TV, and Apple TV dominate the market, even regular users aren't always getting the most out of their electronics. Here are 12 things you didn’t know you could do with your streaming devices.

1. ACCESS SECRET CHANNELS ON ROKU. 

While there are thousands of streaming channels available through Roku’s channel store, there are hundreds more available through private channels, which are streaming apps that Roku doesn’t make available publicly. Installing private channels isn’t as easy as getting channels from Roku directly, but there is an easy workaround for those who want more streaming options. 

First, look for a private channel you would like to install. There are a number of databases online like MKVxStream and StreamFree.tv that have lists of private channels that are worth your time and attention. Once you've found one you want, log into your account on Roku’s website. Under "Manage Account" look for “Add Channel With a Code.” Each private channel has a special code to enter.

For example: “Nowhere TV” is a great resource to watch videos from the Internet Archive and select podcasts on your Roku. Its private channel code is “H9DWC.” Enter the code and within 24 to 36 hours, the private channel will be added to your homepage on your Roku player.

2. MIRROR YOUR CHROME BROWSER OR DESKTOP TO CHROMECAST.

There are a few ways to cast your browser on a big screen TV, but the easiest is already built into Chrome and YouTube. You just have to set your computer and Chromecast to the same internet network. Go to Chrome’s menu options and select “Cast.” After you select the device that you want to cast, select “Tab” or “Desktop” to cast on a TV. If you’re using YouTube, just look for the Chromecast icon in any video’s control panel. This feature is great for presentations and parties, or if you just want to show a friend a funny cat video.

3. CONNECT TO APPLE TV VIA BLUETOOTH.

Apple

Unlike most streaming devices, Apple TV has accessible Bluetooth connectivity built in out-of-the-box, so you can connect a wireless keyboard, headphones, speakers, or game controllers. Simply pair a device under the “Settings” option and “Remotes and Devices.” It comes in handy for quicker searching, or if you don’t want to disturb the people around you while you’re watching a loud movie. Check out a list of quick keyboard shortcuts below:

F3: Switch apps

F4: Go to Home screen

F7: Rewind

F9: Fast forward 

F8 or Spacebar: Play or Pause

F11: Decrease volume

F12: Increase volume  

4. ENABLE INSTANT REPLAY ON ROKU.

Huh? What did he say? You know when you’re watching a TV show or a movie and you just didn’t catch the last line a character said. Well, you can easily go back a few seconds and have the closed caption subtitles appear on the screen with just one click on your remote. To enable instant replay, go to “Settings,” then “Captions,” and then “Instant Replay.”

5. GIVE HOUSEGUESTS ACCESS TO CHROMECAST.

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If you’re having a party and you want your guests to play music or a video from their device, they can access your Chromecast without having access to your home’s Wi-Fi network. It’s a feature called “Guest Mode” in Chromecast that you have to enable, so your guests can keep the party going. 

Here’s how to turn it on: Fire up the Chromecast/Google Home app on your smartphone, then select the device you want to enable. Go to “Settings” and tap “Guest Mode” to turn it on. Now your guests can cast media from their smartphones to your TV without a Wi-Fi password. 

6. WATCH LIVE TV ON AN APPLE TV.

There are a few ways to watch live TV through your Apple TV. If you have a cable subscription, you can sign into your account to watch channels via app with “Single Sign-on” built-in to Apple TV. Once signed in, you can ask Siri to tune in live by saying “Hey Siri! Watch ESPN Live.” Apple TV will then load a live stream of ESPN. “Live Tune-In” works with a number of channel apps, such as CBS, Disney Channel, FXNOW, and CNN Go. You can also use your Apple TV to rewind and pause live TV with HDHomeRun, a flat HD antenna to pick up over-the-air channels, and the Channel app.

7. FIND HIDDEN SCREENS ON ROKU BY USING REMOTE CODES.

There are a few hidden menus buried inside of every Roku player that allow its users to find analytics and other Wi-Fi settings. These menus can be accessed through your remote control with a series of codes. Think of this as Roku’s version of the Konami/Contra Code. Be warned: These hidden menus are for the nerdiest of Roku enthusiasts.

To reboot your Roku, press the Home button five times, and then Up, the Rewind (RW) button twice, and then Fast Forward (FF) twice.

To see your Wi-Fi signal strength, press the Home button five times, and then Up, Down, Up, Down, Up on the D-pad. Now you can see if your Roku player has a strong enough connection for HD streaming. Your Roku should be using 3GB per hour when streaming HD content, according to Netflix.

To access the antenna menu to optimize Wi-Fi, press Home five times, and then FF, Down, RW, Down, FF.

To see or change your streaming bit rate, press Home five times, and then RW three times and FF twice.

To see the channel info menu, press Home three times, and then Up twice, Left, Right, Left, Right, Left on the D-pad.

To put your Roku in developer mode, press Home three times, and then Up twice, Right, Left, Right, Left, Right.

To remove auto-pair for a remote or cycle a banner ad, press Home five times, and then Up, Right, Down, Left, Up.

To factory reset (at your own risk), press Home five times, and then press FF three times, and press RW twice.

8. USING CHROMECAST TO WATCH 3D 'VIRTUAL REALITY' WITHOUT A VR HEADSET.

If you want to experience virtual reality, but don’t own an Oculus Rift, you can use a Chromecast on a 3D TV. Just download the Google Cardboard app, mirror your phone to your 3D TV, and set it to SBS (side-by-side) mode. Now use the 3D glasses that came with your TV to experience an immersive world in your living room.

9. USE A UNIVERSAL REMOTE.

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If your living room is cluttered with a lot of remotes for your TV, Blu-ray player, DVR, stereo system, and Apple TV, you can actually use any infrared (IR) universal remote to consolidate all your home entertainment devices into one remote to rule them all. Instead of programming a cumbersome and long code, your Apple TV can “learn” to sync with your remote. First go to “Settings” on your Apple TV, and then “Remotes and Devices,” and finally “Learn Remote.” Simply press the Up button on the universal remote’s D-pad when prompted until the blue progress bar is full. Do the same action for the remaining five directions, Down, Left, Right, Select, and Menu, and you’re all set.

Alternatively, you can also use an iPhone, iPad, or Apple Watch as a remote too!

10. USE YOUR PHONE AS A KEYBOARD OR HEADPHONES.

If you own a Roku player, then its companion smartphone app is a must to get the most out of your device. It features voice search and a virtual QWERTY keyboard for any Roku player, so the days of mind-numbingly hunting and pecking through Roku’s built-in alphabet keyboard are over. You can even add or remove channels from your phone, while also mirroring your music, videos, and photos on your mobile device. Just make sure the app and the device are on the same home Wi-Fi network.

The app also features Private Listening, which gives you the ability to use headphones while watching anything streaming on your Roku Streaming Stick, so instead of the sound coming out of your TV, it will just come out of your smartphone. Now you can watch TV at night without disturbing your partner while he or she is trying to sleep.

11. BRING IT ALONG TO YOUR HOTEL ROOM.

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Chromecast is a very portable streaming device that just needs an HDMI port and internet access to work. It’s a good option to bring with you if you’re staying in a hotel. However, most hotel rooms don’t let you access the internet due to the Chromecast’s lack of web browser. There are a few easy workarounds to sign in and allow you to watch Netflix or HBO Now on your hotel room’s big screen TV after you plug the Chromecast into its HDMI port.

A good and reliable travel router can connect your hotel’s internet to a Chromecast via laptop or smartphone. It will create a separate IP address to make it easier to connect, although they do generally require the hotel to have an ethernet port. If you don’t want to invest in a travel router, there are a few free solutions for streaming connectivity.

Software like Connectify Hotspot or MyPublicWiFi for PC will turn your laptop into a mobile hotspot for free. Just download the software and create a new hotspot. Then connect your Chromecast to the hotspot for access. For Mac, sharing an internet connection is built into Mac OS under “System Preferences” and “Sharing.” Once your laptop is sharing its Wi-Fi, you can easily connect a Chromecast and enjoy episodes of Stranger Things on the road.

12. USE THE TASK MANAGER TO TROUBLESHOOT PROBLEMS.

Much like any iPhone, iPad, or MacBook, apps in Apple TV can sometimes get glitchy or unresponsive. Instead of rebooting the entire device to make it run smoothly again, you can simply use the task manager built into tvOS and swipe away the buggy app. Once you’re on the home screen, simply double-tap the home button on the Apple TV remote to bring up the task manager. Once fired up, you can quickly switch between apps or kill apps with a swipe. Press the Menu button to exit. Now your channel apps will be running more smoothly.

10 Rad Gifts for Hikers

Greg Rosenke/Unsplash
Greg Rosenke/Unsplash

The popularity of bird-watching, camping, and hiking has skyrocketed this year. Whether your gift recipients are weekend warriors or seasoned dirtbags, they'll appreciate these tools and gear for getting most out of their hiking experience.

1. Stanley Nesting Two-Cup Cookset; $14

Amazon

Stanley’s compact and lightweight cookset includes a 20-ounce stainless steel pot with a locking handle, a vented lid, and two insulated 10-ounce tumblers. It’s the perfect size for brewing hot coffee, rehydrating soup, or boiling water while out on the trail with a buddy. And as some hardcore backpackers note in their Amazon reviews, your favorite hiker can take the tumblers out and stuff the pot with a camp stove, matches, and other necessities to make good use of space in their pack.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Osprey Sirrus and Stratos 24-Liter Hiking Packs; $140

Amazon

Osprey’s packs are designed with trail-tested details to maximize comfort and ease of use. The Sirrus pack (pictured) is sized for women, while the Stratos fits men’s proportions. Both include an internal sleeve for a hydration reservoir, exterior mesh and hipbelt pockets, an attachment for carrying trekking poles, and a built-in rain cover.

Buy them: Amazon, Amazon

3. Yeti Rambler 18-Ounce Bottle; $48

Amazon

Nothing beats ice-cold water after a summer hike or a sip of hot tea during a winter walk. The Yeti Rambler can serve up both: Beverages can stay hot or cold for hours thanks to its insulated construction, and its steel body (in a variety of colors) is basically indestructible. It will add weight to your hiker's pack, though—for a lighter-weight, non-insulated option, the tried-and-true Camelbak Chute water bottle is incredibly sturdy and leakproof.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Mappinners Greatest 100 Hikes of the National Parks Scratch-Off Poster; $30

Amazon

The perfect gift for park baggers in your life (or yourself), this 16-inch-by-20-inch poster features epic hikes like Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. Once the hike is complete, you can scratch off the gold foil to reveal an illustration of the park.

Buy it: Amazon

5. National Geographic Adventure Edition Road Atlas; $19

Amazon

Hikers can use this brand-new, updated road atlas to plan their next adventure. In addition to comprehensive maps of all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Canada, and Mexico, they'll get National Geographic’s top 100 outdoor destinations, useful details about the most popular national parks, and points on the maps noting off-the-beaten-path places to explore.  

Buy it: Amazon

6. Adventure Medical Kits Hiker First-Aid Kit; $25

Amazon

This handy 67-piece kit is stuffed with all the things you hope your hiker will never need in the wilderness. Not only does it contain supplies for pain, cuts and scrapes, burns, and blisters (every hiker’s nemesis!), the items are organized clearly in the bag to make it easy to find tweezers or an alcohol wipe in an emergency.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Hiker Hunger Ultralight Trekking Poles; $70

Amazon

Trekking poles will help increase your hiker's balance and stability and reduce strain on their lower body by distributing it to their arms and shoulders. This pair is made of carbon fiber, a super-strong and lightweight material. From the sweat-absorbing cork handles to the selection of pole tips for different terrain, these poles answer every need on the trail. 

Buy it: Amazon

8. Leatherman Signal Camping Multitool; $120

Amazon

What can’t this multitool do? This gadget contains 19 hiking-friendly tools in a 4.5-inch package, including pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, saw, knife, hammer, wire cutter, and even an emergency whistle.

Buy it: Amazon

9. RAVPower Power Bank; $24

Amazon

Don’t let your hiker get caught off the grid with a dead phone. They can charge RAVPower’s compact power bank before they head out on the trail, and then use it to quickly juice up a phone or tablet when the batteries get low. Its 3-inch-by-5-inch profile won’t take up much room in a pack or purse.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Pack of Four Indestructible Field Books; $14

Amazon

Neither rain, nor snow, nor hail will be a match for these waterproof, tearproof 3.5-inch-by-5.5-inch notebooks. Your hiker can stick one in their pocket along with a regular pen or pencil to record details of their hike or brainstorm their next viral Tweet.

Buy it: Amazon

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Filtration Software Censored the Word Bone at a Paleontology Conference

Lisa Yount, Unsplash
Lisa Yount, Unsplash

Paleontology is the study of natural history through fossils, so the word bone comes up a lot in the field. That didn't stop the term from being censored by software at this year's Society of Vertebrate Paleontology conference, The New York Times reports.

The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology conference has been held for 80 years, and this year it was conducted virtually for the first time due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The new format was largely successful, except when it came to navigating the chat software's filtration system. A built-in algorithm was programmed to censor any words that may have been inappropriate for the professional event. The software blocked out anything offensive, as well as many benign words paleontologists use every day.

T. rex expert Thomas R. Holtz Jr. first noticed the problem when he tried typing "Hell Creek Formation," the name of a fossil hotspot in Montana, while responding to a question. The program replaced the word hell with four asterisks, inspiring some paleontologists to jokingly refer to the site as "Heck Creek."

Hell was one of the less surprising terms that was flagged by the software. In addition to bone, the system also blocked the words pubis, crack, penetrate, stroke, stream, and enlargement. Holtz shared a spreadsheet of the censored words on Twitter.

Convey Services, the company contracted by the conference to provide the chat software, has responded to the complaints by taking a closer look at the list of words that trigger the filter. So if the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology uses the same software again, they will be able to talk about the enlarged crack in a pubis bone they dug up near Hell Creek without fear of censorship.

[h/t The New York Times]