12 More Punny Halloween Costumes

It's that time of year again. Prepare yourself for another round of people dressed as visual gags among the vampires and witches. The best pun costumes make people look at you, think for a moment, and then laugh. Here are some that might make you laugh right now!

1. ASSAULT AND BATTERY

When Above the Law held a costume contest for legally-themed Halloween costumes in 2010, they likely weren't surprised when they got submissions like a ninja warrior or Lady Justice with her scales—but they probably didn't anticipate two NYU students dressing up as a box of salt and a D battery. The pair won first place, based on votes from the site's readers. When asked to comment on his loss, the ninja lawyer could not be found.

2. GANDALF

When a cat-eating alien from Melmac meets the Lord of the Rings, you get GandALF. This ingenious costume was spotted at DragonCon this year.

3. ASH WEDNESDAY

Bahamet234 via Imgur

Combine main Pokémon hunter Ash Ketchum (as in "You've gotta 'Ketchum' all!") with Wednesday Addams from The Addams Family, and you get this amazingly dour costume. Bahamet234 shared this picture of her boyfriend’s punny Halloween look, probably telling him, "The world should get a good peek-at-you."

4. BLACK-EYED PEAS

 

Instagram user mad_irene and a friend got together to make themselves into Black-Eyed Peas for Halloween in 2014. Band, chain restaurant, or legume reference? You decide.

5. HAN SOLO CUP

 

Who poured the shot first? Our favorite smuggler from Star Wars gets the “before and after” treatment. Pamela Kemp Grabinski wore this costume to DragonCon in 2013. And here’s a guy who pulled off the same idea in 2015.

6. JON SNOW WHITE

mankardo via Imgur

This guy knows something about a good punny costume. Jon Snow White definitely has something to crow about. Redditor mankardo posted this picture of his sister’s co-worker dressed as both a Disney princess and the Game of Thrones hero for Halloween. A commenter took this one step further and gave us Jon Snow White Stripes by replacing the sword with a guitar in Photoshop. Things got out of hand with the suggestion of Jon Snow White Walker Texas Ranger, but if you can pull that look off, we might see you on next year's list.

7. THE SECOND AMENDMENT

 

Here's Instagram user Rebecca Jobe exercising her right to bear arms.

8. JACKIE O. LANTERN

 

Combine Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis's iconic ’60s hairdo and pillbox hat with a Halloween pumpkin, and you get Jackie O’Lantern. Very clever, and easier to pull off than Patty O’Furniture. Be the first lady at your party to try this look.

9. HOMER AND MARGE

DubbyDov via Imgur

This is what happens when you tell your husband he should dress like Homer, but don't explain you're dressing up as Marge. A Greek tragedy? More like a modern classic. All puns aside, the bubble wrap hair is a clever move.

10. ZOMBEE

Majorxerocom via Imgur

Zombies are everywhere on Halloween, so you need to up your zombie game if you want to stand out. Majorxerocom used his brains and created a lot of buzz at a costume contest by dressing as a Zombee. Be prepared to weather a hundred Blind Melon references if you recreate this costume, though.

11. CEREAL KILLER

 

What’s one of the scariest things in our spooky campfire tales? A cereal killer. A punny costume classic that still earns its fair share of laughs.

12. CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT

 

Instagram member rbooboo could have been a Halloween hit with just the cat costume, but she went for the deep cut, referencing the old adage purrfectly.

Why Do People Toss Beads During Mardi Gras?

Kameleon007/iStock via Getty Images
Kameleon007/iStock via Getty Images

Each year, more than 1 million people descend on New Orleans for Mardi Gras, an organized parade of debauchery and alcohol-induced torpor that may be the closest thing modern civilization has to the excesses of ancient Rome. Saturating the scene on Bourbon Street are plastic beads, handed or tossed to partygoers as a kind of currency. Some bare their breasts or offer booze in exchange for the tokens; others catch them in the air and wear the layers around their necks. Roughly 25 million pounds of beads are in circulation annually, making them as much a part of the Fat Tuesday celebration as sugary cocktails and King Cake.

Traditions and rituals can be hard to pin down, but Mardi Gras historians believe the idea of distributing trinkets began in the 1870s or 1880s, several hundred years after French settlers introduced the celebration to Louisiana in the 1600s. Party organizers—known locally as krewes—handed out baubles and other shiny objects to revelers to help commemorate the occasion. Some of them threw chocolate-covered almonds. They were joined by more mischievous attendees, who threw dirt or flour on people in an effort to stir up a little bit of trouble.

Why beads? Tiny tokens that represent wealth, health, and other prosperity have been a part of human history for centuries. In Egypt, tokens were handed out in the hopes they would guarantee a happy afterlife; the abacus, or bead-based system of accounting, used trinkets to perform calculations; pagan pre-winter rituals had people throwing grains into fields hoping to appease gods that would nourish their crops.

Humans, argues archaeologist Laurie Wilkie, display "bead lust," or a penchant for shiny objects. It's one possible reason why Mardi Gras attracts so many people with their arms in the air, elated to receive a gift of cheap plastic.

Photo of a well-dressed bulldog celebrating Mardi Gras in New Orleans.
Mario Tama, Getty Images

The early beads were made of glass before more efficient production methods overseas led to an influx of plastic beads in the 1960s. Unlike some of the more organic predecessors, these beads have come under criticism for being a source of health problems and pollution. Made from petroleum, they often harbor lead that seeps into the soil and rubs off on hands. (One estimate puts the lead deposit after a Mardi Gras celebration at 4000 pounds.) In 2017, New Orleans paid $7 million in clean-up costs to remove discarded beads from drain basins. In 2018, they installed gutter guards to prevent the necklaces from getting into the system in the first place. Meanwhile, scientists have been working to create an even more eco-friendly version of the beads—like a biodegradable version made from microalgae.

Environmental hazards aside, the beads of Mardi Gras have become as much a holiday staple as Christmas stockings or Thanksgiving turkeys. But the passion and desperate need for them is only temporary; in 2018, 46 tons of the beads were removed from just five blocks of the main parade route on Charles Street. And no bacchanal should leave that much bad juju behind.

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8 Things That Happened on Leap Day

On Leap Day in 1692, the first warrants were issued in the Salem Witch Trials.
On Leap Day in 1692, the first warrants were issued in the Salem Witch Trials.
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Since Leap Day comes just once every four years, events that happen on February 29 are somewhat rare. Check out these eight events that are extra memorable thanks to their timing.

1. On Leap Day in 1940, Hattie McDaniel won an Academy Award.

Actress Hattie McDaniel took home an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress at the 1940 Academy Awards for her role as Mammy in Gone with the Wind. The win made her the first African American to receive the award.

2. Buddy Holly’s lost glasses were found on Leap Day in 1959.

Buddy Holly in his signature glasses
Buddy Holly in his signature glasses.
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

The singer's famous glasses disappeared for more than two decades after he died in a plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, in 1959. Holly’s trademark frames, along with the Big Bopper’s watch, were thrown clear of the plane wreckage. The items remained buried in the snow until the spring thaw, when they were turned over to the County Sheriff’s office and filed away in a sealed manila envelope, where they were forgotten. The envelope was rediscovered in 1980 by County Sheriff Jerry Allen, who came across it while looking for old court records. The discovery was announced on February 29, 1980. The glasses were returned to Holly’s widow, Maria Elena.

3. The Henriksen siblings—all of them—were born on Leap Day.

On February 29, 1960, Heidi Henriksen was born. Her brother, Olav, joined the family exactly four years later. And in 1968, to the day, Leif-Martin Henriksen entered the world. The Norwegian siblings held the Guinness record for most babies born on a Leap Day until 2012, when the Estes family from Utah tied them: Xavier Estes was born on February 29, 2004; Remington Estes in 2008; and Jade Estes in 2012.

4. Davy Jones died on Leap Day in 2012.

In 2012, the Monkee passed away after suffering a heart attack. He was just 66, leaving many fans in shock at his unexpected death.

5. Hank Aaron became the highest-paid Major League Baseball Player on Leap Day.

A $200,000-a-year contract might seem like peanuts for a MLB player today, but by 1972 standards, it was a big deal. So big, in fact, that the three-year contract Aaron inked to play for the Atlanta Braves made him the highest paid baseball player in the league.

6. The future Pope John Paul II was nearly killed on Leap Day.

Pope John Paul II riding in the Popemobile
Pope John Paul II riding in the Popemobile in 2004.

Back when he was just 24-year-old Karol Wojtyla, Pope John Paul II was walking home when a German army truck hit him and left him on the road for dead. The driver of a lumber truck picked him up and took him to the hospital, where Wojtyla remained unconscious for nine hours. It’s said that the incident inspired him to switch to a spiritual career path.

7. Family Circus debuted on Leap Day in 1960.

On February 29, 1960, Bil Keane’s long-running comic strip debuted as The Family Circle. Inspired by Keane’s own wife and children, Family Circus is now drawn by Keane’s youngest son, Jeff—the inspiration for “Jeffy” in the comic strip.

8. The first warrants were issued in the Salem Witch Trials on Leap Day.

Salem residents Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba were accused of witchcraft on February 29, 1692. After refusing to confess, Good was hanged and Osborne died in prison; Tituba, a slave, admitted to her supposed crimes and was released from jail a year later.

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