16 Christmas Party Beverages, Cocktails, and Jello Shots

iStock.com/Rimma_Bondarenko
iStock.com/Rimma_Bondarenko

On the weekend before Christmas, you may be off work and ready to celebrate with friends before the whole family gets together. A Christmas party only takes people and maybe some food, but along with your Christmas treats and snacks and drinks, you should have at least one visually stimulating recipe that will truly impress your guests. With that in mind, here are some eye-popping holiday beverages you can whip up, including cocktails, punches, non-alcoholic drinks, and jello shots. Follow the links for the complete recipes.

1. The Candy Cane

The cocktail called the Candy Cane consists of white chocolate liqueur and peppermint schnapps. Make the visual effect grand with a rim of crushed candy canes!

2. Candy Cane Spritzers

Why should adults have all the cocktail fun? Candy Cane Spritzers are fancy holiday drinks with no alcohol that kids will love. And it's not too sweet. The flavor and color comes from pomegranate juice; the canes are just for garnish.

3. Candy Cane Punch

Candy Cane Punch is an easy, non-alcoholic party punch that gets its Christmas flavor from the use of peppermint ice cream. But miniature candy canes for garnish add an extra touch.

4. Candy Cane Milkshake

This looks amazing—and fattening. But no! This Candy Cane Milkshake has only 205 calories, because it contains no ice cream or candy. It does, however, taste like a candy cane, thanks to peppermint extract and low-calorie sweetener. A perfect non-alcoholic treat that won't blow your diet.

5. Candy Cane Swirl

Holiday martini with a candy cane 
iStock.com/mg7

I promise that there are drinks that aren't candy cane-flavored coming up! The Candy Cane Swirl gets its kick from raspberry vodka and peppermint schnapps. But there are mixers as well.

6. Santa Shot

The Santa Shot has both the look and the taste of Christmas, which is good, because you'll want to limit the number that you serve. There are no mixers, just layers of grenadine, green creme de menthe, and red peppermint schnapps.

7. Cranberry Margarita

If limes and strawberries make great margaritas, you know the traditional holiday flavor of tart cranberries would, too. This Cranberry Margarita also has a touch of orange from orange liqueur, which should taste like my mother's traditional homemade cranberry-and-fresh-orange sauce.

8. Jingle Jangle Holiday Punch

Jingle Jangle Holiday Punch contains your favorite fresh berries, both crushed in the mixture and again whole as an eye-pleasing garnish in the individual servings. Oh, it also has vodka, wine, and Grand Marnier in it.

9. Mistletoe Mojito

The Mistletoe Mojito is a mojito spiced up with the flavor of pomegranate. If you don't already associate pomegranate with Christmas, maybe you should start! Mint, lime, and pomegranate have the perfect colors.

10. Grasshopper

Thin Mint fans will love the Grasshopper, which has a seasonally appropriate hue and can be modified to be heavier on the mint or the chocolate. You can crush chocolate-mint cookies for the rim, or use shaved chocolate.

11. Gingerbread Apple Cocktail

The Gingerbread Apple Cocktail gets its taste from ginger liqueur and apple cider, and vodka adds the kick. The rim is crushed gingersnaps held on with honey or agave syrup!

12. The Grinch

The Grinch cocktail has more of the Christmas look than the flavor. Just make sure your melon liqueur is the right color! The cherry garnish represents the Grinch's shrunken heart.

There are those who might argue that Jello shots aren't beverages. Instead of arguing, let's just enjoy some ways to make your Jello shots more Christmas-y. The folks at your party don't care.

13. Blue Christmas Jello Shots

The liquor is subtle in these Blue Christmas Jello Shots, containing champagne and blue Curacao instead of vodka. Marshmallows and blue candy canes complete the look.

14. Caramel Apple Jello Shots

Caramel Apple Jello Shots are apple slices containing a homemade gelatin mixture with coconut milk, caramel hot chocolate mix, and butterscotch schnapps. The combined effect is that of a caramel apple—with alcohol.

15. Jingle Bell Rock Jello Shots

If you do want to make Jello shots in Christmas colors, here's your recipe. Jingle Bell Rock Jello Shots are layered with cranberry juice and vodka for red, apple flavor for the green, and condensed milk and peppermint schnapps for the white.

16. Candy Cane Jello Shots

Oh yes, here's one more candy cane recipe! Candy Cane Jello Shots are a culinary/mixology work of art. It takes time, as the red and white gelatin layers must be carefully poured and chilled one at a time, then sliced and cut into shapes. The flavor comes from peppermint schnapps.

America’s 10 Most Hated Easter Candies

Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Whether you celebrate Easter as a religious holiday or not, it’s an opportune time to welcome the sunny, flora-filled season of spring with a basket or two of your favorite candy. And when it comes to deciding which Easter-themed confections belong in that basket, people have pretty strong opinions.

This year, CandyStore.com surveyed more than 19,000 customers to find out which sugary treats are widely considered the worst. If you’re a traditionalist, this may come as a shock: Cadbury Creme Eggs, Peeps, and solid chocolate bunnies are the top three on the list, and generic jelly beans landed in the ninth spot. While Peeps have long been polarizing, it’s a little surprising that the other three classics have so few supporters. Based on some comments left by participants, it seems like people are just really particular about the distinctions between certain types of candy.

Generic jelly beans, for example, were deemed old and bland, but people adore gourmet jelly beans, which were the fifth most popular Easter candy. Similarly, people thought Cadbury Creme Eggs were messy and low-quality, while Cadbury Mini Eggs—which topped the list of best candies—were considered inexplicably delicious and even “addictive.” And many candy lovers prefer hollow chocolate bunnies to solid ones, which people explained were simply “too much.” One participant even likened solid bunnies to bricks.

candystore.com's worst easter candies
The pretty pastel shades of bunny corn don't seem to be fooling the large contingent of candy corn haters.
CandyStore.com

If there’s one undeniable takeaway from the list of worst candies, it’s that a large portion of the population isn’t keen on chewy marshmallow treats in general. The eighth spot went to Hot Tamales Peeps, and Brach’s Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits—which one person christened “the zombie bunny catacomb statue candy”—sits at number six.

Take a look at the full list below, and read more enlightening (and entertaining) survey comments here.

  1. Cadbury Creme Eggs
  1. Peeps
  1. Solid chocolate bunnies
  1. Bunny Corn
  1. Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits
  1. Chocolate crosses
  1. Twix Eggs
  1. Hot Tamales Peeps
  1. Generic jelly beans
  1. Fluffy Stuff Cotton Tails

[h/t CandyStore.com]

84-Year-Old Italian Nonna Is Live-Streaming Pasta-Making Classes From Her Home Outside Rome

beingbonny, iStock via Getty Images
beingbonny, iStock via Getty Images

If you're looking for an entertaining distraction and a way to feed yourself that doesn't involve going outside, sign up for a virtual cooking class. Since the COVID-19 pandemic forced people around the world into isolation, plenty of new remote learning options have appeared on the internet. But few of them feature an 84-year-old Italian nonna teaching you how to make pasta from scratch.

As Broadsheet reports, Nonna Nerina is now hosting pasta-making classes every weekend from her home outside Rome. Before Italy went into lockdown to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, the home cooking instructor taught her students in person. By moving online, she's able to share her authentic family recipes with people around the world while keeping herself healthy.

Live classes are two hours long and take place during Saturday and Sunday. This weekend, Nonna Nerina is making fettuccine with tomato sauce and cannelloni, though you won't be able to tune in if you haven't signed up yet—the slots are booked up until at least mid-April. If you'd prefer to take your remote cooking lessons during the week, Nerina's granddaughter Chiara hosts pasta-making classes Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays.

Classes cost $50, and you can sign up for them now through the Nonna Nerina website. Here are more educational videos to check out while you're stuck inside.

[h/t Broadsheet]

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