Scientists Catch Tiny Jumping Spiders Eating Frogs and Lizards

Tom Houslay, Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-NC 2.0
Tom Houslay, Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-NC 2.0

Small, but mighty: Some jumping spiders can overpower and devour their larger, cold-blooded, would-be predators, according to scientists writing in the Journal of Arachnology.

Biologist Martin Nyffeler at the University of Basel in Switzerland spends his days studying arachnid and insect eating habits. Over the last few years, he and his colleagues have made some astounding discoveries. For one, not only do spiders consume millions of tons of bugs each year, but they also eat fish, and bats, and plants. With a palate this broad, a hunger this big, and a ferocity to match, why wouldn't little spiders occasionally order off the reptile and amphibian menu? The researchers decided to search the scientific literature for reports of spider-on-frog-or-lizard action.

They found plenty. Their search unearthed one sighting in Costa Rica and eight separate instances in seven different Florida counties, all initiated by a single species. The regal jumping spider may weigh less than one-tenth of an ounce, but that apparently doesn't stop it from going after frogs and small lizards called anoles.

One report came from local nature blogger Loret Setters, who watched a Cuban tree frog disappear into a regal jumping spider's mouth.

"He was staring me down, like, 'You're next!'" Setters told National Geographic. "I was completely shocked."

A female regal jumping spider goes to town on a Cuban frog.Nyffeler et al. 2017. Journal of Arachnology.

This remarkable reversal of the predator-prey relationship is made possible by jumping spiders' specialized hunting skills. Unlike most spiders, which spin webs and then lie in wait, jumping spiders stalk their prey like tigers. They have incredibly good vision and decent hearing, and they're all venomous.

Behavioral ecologist Thomas C. Jones of East Tennessee State University was not involved with the study but says spiders likely only go after frogs and lizards when easier meals are scarce.

"They do tend to get bolder as they get hungrier," he said.

[h/t National Geographic News]

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Can You Find the Doe Hiding Among the Stags?

Can you spot the doe?
Can you spot the doe?
Dudolf

Gergely "Dudolf" Dudás has a way of turning simple images into mind-numbing puzzles. Look closely at his amazing illustrations of squirrels, snails, and rabbits, and you'll find an object that doesn't belong in each one. This new image from the artist features a doe hiding in a crowd of stags, and it may be one of his toughest brainteasers yet.

Dudolf

Most of Dudolf's hidden image puzzles pair items that look similar. In the image above, the only difference between the doe and the stags surrounding it is the lack of antlers. You may have to study a lot of deer heads before finding the animal that's out of place. If you're feeling impatient, you can check the solution at the bottom of the page.

Dudolf has released many brain teasers inspired by the holidays. Pictures he's illustrated in the past include a sheep hidden among Santas, a snowman among snowflakes, and a panda among snowmen.

Looking for more ways to challenge your brain? See if you can beat these tricky puzzles.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Dudolf