Get in the Halloween Spirit With a NASA-Curated Playlist of Spooky Space Sounds

Jupiter
Jupiter
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/John Landino

A metallic screech, an eerie whir, an otherworldly growl: The playlist below sounds like it was curated for a haunted house. But the sound bites weren’t recorded to create a creepy atmosphere; they were captured by NASA scientists looking to learn more about the far reaches of our solar system. Now, in honor of Halloween, the space agency has decided to embrace the spooky vibe of its auditory data by compiling its most spine-tingling space noises into one soundtrack.

While it is true that in space, no one can hear you scream, it is possible for spacecraft to pick up radio waves that scientists can later convert to sound. This SoundCloud playlist includes 22 tracks recorded by NASA vessels exploring various corners of our solar neighborhood. In the first clip, you can hear the unsettling shriek captured as NASA’s Juno probe penetrated Jupiter’s magnetic field. Cassini also transmitted some unusual sounds, like radio waves related to the auroras radiated by Saturn’s poles. Plasma waves, lightning on Jupiter, and a shower of stardust are also featured in the collection.

If you’re doing some last-minute music selection for your Halloween party, whether it’s science fiction-themed or not, any track on this playlist would make an appropriate addition. Your guests will likely be grateful to hear anything that’s not "Monster Mash" for the 50th time.

The Smithsonian Needs Your Help Transcribing Sally Ride’s Notebooks

Sally Ride in 1984.
Sally Ride in 1984.
Coffeeandcrumbs, NASA, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

On June 18, 1983, Sally K. Ride made history when she became the first American woman to travel into space. Now, the Smithsonian Institution is making the history of her incredible decades-long career more accessible to everyone—and they need your help to do it.

The National Air and Space Museum Archives is home to the Sally K. Ride Papers, a collection of 38,640 physical pages (over 23 cubic feet) of material spanning Ride’s professional life as an astronaut, physicist, and educator from the 1970s to 2010s. Those resources have been scanned and used to create an online finding aid—not unlike a table of contents—so researchers can easily navigate through the wealth of information.

To simplify the searching process within that online finding aid, the Smithsonian Institution is asking for volunteers to transcribe documents in the Smithsonian’s Transcription Center, a digital hub launched in 2013, where anybody can sign up to type and review historical sources. Three projects from the Sally K. Ride Papers are currently available to transcribe, which include her notes for shuttle training between 1979 and 1981, notes about the Remote Manipulator System Arm (there's one on the International Space Station today), and notes from NASA commissions on which she served. One, for example, was the Rogers Commission, which investigated the causes of the fatal Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986.

You can find out more about the documents in the projects here, and if you’re interested in joining the forces of “volunpeers,” as the Smithsonian likes to call its transcribers, you can create a new user account here. (All you’ll need is a username and email address.)

Check out more citizen science projects you can participate in at home here.

How to Livestream Tonight’s Super Pink Moon

Matt Cardy/Stringer/Getty Images
Matt Cardy/Stringer/Getty Images

On April 7, 2020, a super pink moon will appear over the horizon. Though it's not actually pink (the name's meaning comes from the wildflower Phlox subulata, or moss pink), the supermoon is still worth seeing. Today, the moon will reach the closest point to Earth in its orbit just hours before becoming completely full, which adds up to give us the biggest and brightest supermoon of the year. And no matter where you are in the world, you can livestream the spectacle online.

Slooh, a celestial event streaming service, will begin broadcasting the super pink moon at 7:30 p.m. ET tonight, April 7. A team of astronomy experts and educators will be joining the feed to provide commentary until the stream ends. You can tune in through Slooh's Facebook live event or YouTube channel for free, or you can become a member to watch it on their website.

Slooh has telescopes around the world that allow users to explore space from their computers. If you sign up for a membership today, you'll be able to capture and share photos of the supermoon, virtually interact with the experts at the live event, and personally control Slooh’s telescopes to customize your view of the moon. And when tonight's event is over, you'll still be able to virtually control Slooh's six telescopes in the Canary Islands and four telescopes in Chile throughout the year.

A basic, annual membership with Slooh costs $100. If you're a student, the service is offering a limited-edition price of $20 for individuals. The deal aims to promote remote teaching and learning during a time when schools around the world are closed.

For people living in cities with light pollution, celestial livestreams are a great alternative to real-life stargazing. Slooh isn't the only platform airing tonight's event. Today, the Virtual Telescope Project in Italy will host its own livestream of the super pink moon on YouTube.

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