How to Navigate by the Stars

Thinkstock
Thinkstock

Explorers have used the stars as a compass for millennia, and if you’re out having adventures at night, you should add the skill to your arsenal. (If nothing else, it’s a killer party trick.) Here’s how to transform the night sky into your personal roadmap.

1) Learn the Big Three

According to the Royal Naval Academy, 58 stars are handy for navigation. You need to know 38 different constellations to find all of them. If that seems daunting, there’s a cheat code. Just learn to spot three constellations: Cassiopeia, Crux, and Orion. Also keep your eye on the Big and Little Dipper.

2) Find the North Star

It’s always within one degree of true north. So use the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia are your guides. Look at the Dipper’s ladle and pretend you’re pouring soup from it. The flow of that space soup will point straight to the North Star. If you hit a constellation that looks like a wonky ‘W,’ you’ve gone too far. That’s Cassiopeia. Recalculate your cosmic GPS and back up. The North Star is smack between Cassiopeia and the Big Dipper.

3) Shoot for the Moon

If you can find Orion’s sword, following its point will show you south. Alternatively, if there’s a crescent moon, draw an imaginary line from between its tips and follow it to the horizon. That’ll point your toward the penguins.

4) Down Under? No Problem!

The North Star isn’t visible below the equator. Instead, look for the constellation Crux—it resembles a kite. If you draw a line from the top of the kite to the bottom, it’ll point you south.

5) Move Like a Star

Like the sun, stars skate east to west. Tracking how they travel across the sky should tell you which way you’re facing. For something more precise, look to Orion’s belt. The star on the belt’s right side—Mintaka—rises close to true east and sets at true west.

6) Take a Survey

Forgot to memorize your constellations? There’s an easy fix. Simply place two sticks in the ground and set them one yard apart. Now pick a star—any star. Line it up with the tops of both sticks, as if you were looking down a rifle sight. The earth’s rotation will make the star “move.” If it runs left, you’re facing north. If it shifts right, you’re south. If it rises, you’re east. If it sinks, west.

The New Apple Watch SE Is Now Available on Amazon

Apple/Amazon
Apple/Amazon

Apple products are notorious for their high price tags. From AirPods to iPads to MacBooks, it can be difficult to find the perfect piece of tech on sale when you are ready to buy. Luckily, for those who have had their eye on a new Apple Watch, the Apple Watch SE is designed with all the features users want but at a lower starting price of $279— and they're available on Amazon right now.

The SE exists as a more affordable option when compared to Apple's new Series 6 line of watches. This less expensive version has many of the same functions of its pricier brethren, except for certain features like the blood oxygen sensor and electrical heart sensor. To make up for the truncated bells and whistles, the SE comes in at least $120 cheaper than the Series 6, which starts at $400 and goes up to $800. The SE comes with technical improvements on previous models as well, such as the fall detection, a faster processor, a larger screen, water resistance, and more.

Now available in 40mm ($279) and 44mm ($309), both SE models offer a variety of colors to choose from, such as sliver, space gray, and pink. If you want cellular connection, you’ll have to pay a bit more for the 40mm ($329) and the 44mm ($359).

For more, head to Amazon to see the full list of offerings from Apple.

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100 Fascinating Facts About Earth

The best Spaceball.
The best Spaceball.
NASA

Did you know that there’s a place in the South Pacific Ocean called Point Nemo that’s farther from land than any other point on Earth? So far, in fact, that the closest humans are usually astronauts aboard the International Space Station. (And by the way: The map you’re about to look for Point Nemo on might not be entirely accurate; a certain amount of distortion occurs when trying to depict a 3D planet on a 2D surface.)

In this all-new episode of The List Show, Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy is journeying to the center of the Earth, and visiting its oceans, its atmosphere, and even space, in search of 100 facts about our endlessly fascinating planet.

The subjects that fall under the umbrella of “facts about Earth” are nearly as expansive as Earth itself. Geology, biology, astronomy, and cartography, are all fair game—and those are just a few of the many -ologies, -onomies, and -ographies you’ll learn about below. 

Press play to find out more Earth-shattering facts, and subscribe to the Mental Floss YouTube channel for more fact-filled videos here.